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displaying 16 - 30 of 49

CFP: [18th] Hypertext and Intertext: Recasting the Master Narrative (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:10pm
Cynthia Calhoun

Jasper Fforde’s popular series of literary detective novels, beginning
with The Eyre Affair, popularized a little-studied literary trope:
intertextual references and devices that subvert the linear master
narrative. From farting bookworms to the “footnoterphone,” Fforde
utilizes font types, footnotes, and misspellings to argue for a multi-
textuality in his novels. How have other writers done the same? For
what purpose? How does this practice affect us as readers? This panel
seeks critical and creative presentations that explore these questions.
Topics may include self-referencing, online hypertext, multiple
narrators, and much more.

CFP: [Renaissance] Hypertext and Intertext: Recasting the Master Narrative (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:09pm
Cynthia Calhoun

Jasper Fforde’s popular series of literary detective novels, beginning
with The Eyre Affair, popularized a little-studied literary trope:
intertextual references and devices that subvert the linear master
narrative. From farting bookworms to the “footnoterphone,” Fforde
utilizes font types, footnotes, and misspellings to argue for a multi-
textuality in his novels. How have other writers done the same? For
what purpose? How does this practice affect us as readers? This panel
seeks critical and creative presentations that explore these questions.
Topics may include self-referencing, online hypertext, multiple
narrators, and much more.

CFP: [Medieval] Hypertext and Intertext: Recasting the Master Narrative (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:09pm
Cynthia Calhoun

Jasper Fforde’s popular series of literary detective novels, beginning
with The Eyre Affair, popularized a little-studied literary trope:
intertextual references and devices that subvert the linear master
narrative. From farting bookworms to the “footnoterphone,” Fforde
utilizes font types, footnotes, and misspellings to argue for a multi-
textuality in his novels. How have other writers done the same? For
what purpose? How does this practice affect us as readers? This panel
seeks critical and creative presentations that explore these questions.
Topics may include self-referencing, online hypertext, multiple
narrators, and much more.

CFP: [Graduate] To (Un)Make the Pain: The Language and Empathy of Suffering (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29/08-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:07pm
Cynthia Calhoun

In Elaine Scarry’s book Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the
World, she claims that pain is language destroying, essentially
establishing a barrier between the self and reality that eliminates
meaningful communication with the outside world. Therefore, not only is
it impossible to adequately describe pain, but the possibility of empathy
is all but destroyed. This panel seeks critical and creative
presentations that explore and engage the question: How can a subject
effectively communicate the experience of pain? How can a community
understand or empathize with that subject? Topics may include specific
writers â€" such as Sylvia Plath or Philip K. Dick â€" or a more general
theoretical study.

CFP: [General] To (Un)Make the Pain: The Language and Empathy of Suffering (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29/08-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:06pm
Cynthia Calhoun

In Elaine Scarry’s book Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the
World, she claims that pain is language destroying, essentially
establishing a barrier between the self and reality that eliminates
meaningful communication with the outside world. Therefore, not only is
it impossible to adequately describe pain, but the possibility of empathy
is all but destroyed. This panel seeks critical and creative
presentations that explore and engage the question: How can a subject
effectively communicate the experience of pain? How can a community
understand or empathize with that subject? Topics may include specific
writers â€" such as Sylvia Plath or Philip K. Dick â€" or a more general
theoretical study.

CFP: [Theory] To (Un)Make the Pain: The Language and Empathy of Suffering (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29/08-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:05pm
Cynthia Calhoun

In Elaine Scarry’s book Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the
World, she claims that pain is language destroying, essentially
establishing a barrier between the self and reality that eliminates
meaningful communication with the outside world. Therefore, not only is
it impossible to adequately describe pain, but the possibility of empathy
is all but destroyed. This panel seeks critical and creative
presentations that explore and engage the question: How can a subject
effectively communicate the experience of pain? How can a community
understand or empathize with that subject? Topics may include specific
writers â€" such as Sylvia Plath or Philip K. Dick â€" or a more general
theoretical study.

CFP: [American] To (Un)Make the Pain: The Language and Empathy of Suffering (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29/08-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:04pm
Cynthia Calhoun

In Elaine Scarry’s book Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the
World, she claims that pain is language destroying, essentially
establishing a barrier between the self and reality that eliminates
meaningful communication with the outside world. Therefore, not only is
it impossible to adequately describe pain, but the possibility of empathy
is all but destroyed. This panel seeks critical and creative
presentations that explore and engage the question: How can a subject
effectively communicate the experience of pain? How can a community
understand or empathize with that subject? Topics may include specific
writers â€" such as Sylvia Plath or Philip K. Dick â€" or a more general
theoretical study.

CFP: [20th] To (Un)Make the Pain: The Language and Empathy of Suffering (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29/08-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:03pm
Cynthia Calhoun

In Elaine Scarry’s book Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the
World, she claims that pain is language destroying, essentially
establishing a barrier between the self and reality that eliminates
meaningful communication with the outside world. Therefore, not only is
it impossible to adequately describe pain, but the possibility of empathy
is all but destroyed. This panel seeks critical and creative
presentations that explore and engage the question: How can a subject
effectively communicate the experience of pain? How can a community
understand or empathize with that subject? Topics may include specific
writers â€" such as Sylvia Plath or Philip K. Dick â€" or a more general
theoretical study.

CFP: [Victorian]

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:02pm
Cynthia Calhoun

In Elaine Scarry’s book Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the
World, she claims that pain is language destroying, essentially
establishing a barrier between the self and reality that eliminates
meaningful communication with the outside world. Therefore, not only is
it impossible to adequately describe pain, but the possibility of empathy
is all but destroyed. This panel seeks critical and creative
presentations that explore and engage the question: How can a subject
effectively communicate the experience of pain? How can a community
understand or empathize with that subject? Topics may include specific
writers â€" such as Sylvia Plath or Philip K. Dick â€" or a more general
theoretical study.

CFP: [Romantic] To (Un)Make the Pain: The Language and Empathy of Suffering (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29/08-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:01pm
Cynthia Calhoun

In Elaine Scarry’s book Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the
World, she claims that pain is language destroying, essentially
establishing a barrier between the self and reality that eliminates
meaningful communication with the outside world. Therefore, not only is
it impossible to adequately describe pain, but the possibility of empathy
is all but destroyed. This panel seeks critical and creative
presentations that explore and engage the question: How can a subject
effectively communicate the experience of pain? How can a community
understand or empathize with that subject? Topics may include specific
writers â€" such as Sylvia Plath or Philip K. Dick â€" or a more general
theoretical study.

CFP: [18th] To (Un)Make the Pain: The Language and Empathy of Suffering (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29/08-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:01pm
Cynthia Calhoun

In Elaine Scarry’s book Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the
World, she claims that pain is language destroying, essentially
establishing a barrier between the self and reality that eliminates
meaningful communication with the outside world. Therefore, not only is
it impossible to adequately describe pain, but the possibility of empathy
is all but destroyed. This panel seeks critical and creative
presentations that explore and engage the question: How can a subject
effectively communicate the experience of pain? How can a community
understand or empathize with that subject? Topics may include specific
writers â€" such as Sylvia Plath or Philip K. Dick â€" or a more general
theoretical study.

CFP: [Renaissance] To (Un)Make the Pain: The Language and Empathy of Suffering (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29/08-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 5:00pm
Cynthia Calhoun

In Elaine Scarry’s book Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the
World, she claims that pain is language destroying, essentially
establishing a barrier between the self and reality that eliminates
meaningful communication with the outside world. Therefore, not only is
it impossible to adequately describe pain, but the possibility of empathy
is all but destroyed. This panel seeks critical and creative
presentations that explore and engage the question: How can a subject
effectively communicate the experience of pain? How can a community
understand or empathize with that subject? Topics may include specific
writers â€" such as Sylvia Plath or Philip K. Dick â€" or a more general
theoretical study.

CFP: [Medieval] To (Un)Make the Pain: The Language and Empathy of Suffering (grad panel, 10/15/07; 2/29/08-3/1/08)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 4:59pm
Cynthia Calhoun

In Elaine Scarry’s book Body in Pain: The Making and Unmaking of the
World, she claims that pain is language destroying, essentially
establishing a barrier between the self and reality that eliminates
meaningful communication with the outside world. Therefore, not only is
it impossible to adequately describe pain, but the possibility of empathy
is all but destroyed. This panel seeks critical and creative
presentations that explore and engage the question: How can a subject
effectively communicate the experience of pain? How can a community
understand or empathize with that subject? Topics may include specific
writers â€" such as Sylvia Plath or Philip K. Dick â€" or a more general
theoretical study.

CFP: [General] PCA/ACA Animation Area, San Francisco March 19-22, 2008

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 4:49pm
Jim Walker

CALL FOR PAPERS

Animation Area of the Popular Culture Association
 
Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association
National Conference
San Francisco , CA
March 19-22, 2008

The Animation Area of the Popular Culture Association seeks individual-
papers and panel proposals for presentation at the 2008 National
Conference of the Popular Culture Association and American Culture
Association, to be held at the San Francisco Marriott Hotel (San
Francisco, California) March 19-22, 2008.

Proposal which consider the diversity of animation in relation to popular
culture are welcomed. Possible themes for papers/panels include but are
not restricted to:

CFP: [Theory] Oscar Wilde's Critical Essays (11/15/07); collection)

updated: 
Monday, September 17, 2007 - 4:11pm
Alfred J. Drake

I welcome abstracts and full essays for a proposed volume on Oscar Wilde's
critical essays with an emphasis on how those texts were received in the
author's own time and how they have impacted contemporary debates in
criticism and theory. I will also consider abstracts that deal with
Wilde's fiction, poetry, or drama if they suit the collection's emphasis.

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