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CFP: [American] Nineteenth Century Migration and Mobility

updated: 
Friday, January 4, 2008 - 8:39pm
Grace Wetzel

"Get a Move On!": Nineteenth Century Migration and Mobility

A Graduate English Conference sponsored by the University of South
Carolina

Keynote Speaker: Ian Duncan, University of California, Berkeley

Dates: March 7-8, 2008

Abstract Deadline: January 25, 2008

Immigrants and expatriates, sailors and soldiers, travelers and
wanderers, men and women: people in the nineteenth century were moving.
Novels and new inventions such as railroads, steamships, and street cars
provided vehicles of transport for individuals and their imaginations,
while the transnational movements of ideas and populations gave rise to a
newly globalized Anglo-American literature.

UPDATE: [Victorian] Deadline Extension: Nineteenth Century Migration and Mobility

updated: 
Friday, January 4, 2008 - 8:37pm
Grace Wetzel

"Get a Move On!": Nineteenth Century Migration and Mobility

A Graduate English Conference sponsored by the University of South
Carolina

Dates: March 7-8, 2008

Keynote Speaker: Ian Duncan, University of California, Berkeley
 
Abstract Deadline: January 25, 2008

Immigrants and expatriates, sailors and soldiers, travelers and
wanderers, men and women: people in the nineteenth century were moving.
Novels and new inventions such as railroads, steamships, and street cars
provided vehicles of transport for individuals and their imaginations,
while the transnational movements of ideas and populations gave rise to a
newly globalized Anglo-American literature.

UPDATE: [Graduate] Deadline Extension: Nineteenth Century Migration and Mobility

updated: 
Friday, January 4, 2008 - 8:35pm
Grace Wetzel

"Get a Move On!": Nineteenth Century Migration and Mobility

A Graduate English Conference sponsored by the University of South
Carolina
Dates: March 7-8, 2008
Keynote Speaker: Ian Duncan, University of California, Berkeley

Abstract Deadline: January 25, 2008

Immigrants and expatriates, sailors and soldiers, travelers and
wanderers, men and women: people in the nineteenth century were moving.
Novels and new inventions such as railroads, steamships, and street cars
provided vehicles of transport for individuals and their imaginations,
while the transnational movements of ideas and populations gave rise to a
newly globalized Anglo-American literature.