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CFP: [Theatre] Vanguards of the Right

updated: 
Friday, May 9, 2008 - 2:55am
Kimberly Jannarone

Vanguards of the Right

Kimberly Jannarone
Theater Arts Department
University of California, Santa Cruz
kmj_at_ucsc.edu

CFP: [American] Graduate Student Conference on Empire and Imperialism

updated: 
Friday, May 9, 2008 - 1:19am
Robert Levine

Call for papers: Rethinking Empire and Imperialism in Nineteenth-Century
American Literature
 
A Graduate Student Conference at the University of Maryland, College Park
NOVEMBER 7-8, 2008
 
Keynote speaker: Professor Amy Kaplan, University of Pennsylvania
  
The publication of Amy Kaplan and Donald Pease's coedited collection,
_Cultures of United States Imperialism_ (1993), helped spawn new interest
in imperialism, empire, race, and nation in U.S. literary studies. Among
the most influential recent works to examine such topics are John Carlos
Rowe's _Literary Culture and U.S. Imperialism_ (2000) and Amy Kaplan's _The

CFP: [Collections] Sanctity and Power in Medieval English Literature

updated: 
Thursday, May 8, 2008 - 9:25pm
Erin Mullally

Call for papers for an edited collection exploring the connections between
sanctity and power in medieval literature. A frequent trope in medieval
accounts of saints, within both hagiographical and historical narratives,
is a significant and central relationship between the saint and an
authority figure; for example, St Judas confronts the queenly St. Elene in
the Old English poem Elene; St. Wulfstan confronts William the Conqueror in
the Vita Wulfstani; and Margery Kempe confronts her bishop, Philip
Repyngdon, as well as the Archbishop of Canterbury, in her eponymous
biography. A positive relationship between saintly men and women and their

CFP: [Medieval] Sanctity and Power in Medieval English Literature

updated: 
Thursday, May 8, 2008 - 9:24pm
Erin Mullally

Call for papers for an edited collection exploring the connections between
sanctity and power in medieval literature. A frequent trope in medieval
accounts of saints, within both hagiographical and historical narratives,
is a significant and central relationship between the saint and an
authority figure; for example, St Judas confronts the queenly St. Elene in
the Old English poem Elene; St. Wulfstan confronts William the Conqueror in
the Vita Wulfstani; and Margery Kempe confronts her bishop, Philip
Repyngdon, as well as the Archbishop of Canterbury, in her eponymous
biography. A positive relationship between saintly men and women and their

CFP: [Renaissance] Afterlives and Adaptations––SAMLA, 11/7–9/2008

updated: 
Thursday, May 8, 2008 - 4:33pm
Meg Pearson

In keeping with SAMLA's special focus on drama this year, we welcome papers
addressing adaptation and early modern drama. Of particular interest are
papers that cross national and period boundaries to discuss how figures,
plots, and even scenery lived on and changed from one play to another, even
across centuries. Possible topics might include but are not limited to the
adoption of medieval dramatic tropes and visuals by Tudor and Stuart
playwrights, the adaptation of non-Shakespearean plays into film, the
afterlife in later centuries of early modern dramatic figures like Faustus,
the manipulation of trial transcripts by playwrights, Senecan adaptations

UPDATE: [Film] Television without Borders

updated: 
Thursday, May 8, 2008 - 9:43am
Elke Weissmann

Dear colleagues,

 

Apologies for cross-posting.

 

This is to inform colleagues that there is only one week left to register
on the early bird fee for the conference Television without Borders at
the University of Reading on 27-29 June. For more details and a
registration form see the message below. Also, there are only very few
rooms left to be booked on campus, so if you are planning to come and
stay on campus, I can recommend you register soon,

 

If you have any questions or would like further information, please don’t
hesitate to contact me or visit the website:

 

UPDATE: [Postcolonial] Things Fall Apart & the Next Half-Century of African Literature

updated: 
Thursday, May 8, 2008 - 8:45am
Adrian S. Wisnicki

University of Nottingham
&
African Writing Magazine

Call for Papers

Things Fall Apart & the Next Half-Century of African Literature
 (A 50th Anniversary Conference)

5 September 2008, University of Nottingham, UK

Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart is the biggest selling African novel,
having been translated into more than 50 languages. Its publication in 1958
was the epochal event in African literature, leading to a transformation in
the literary landscape. On the fiftieth anniversary of its publication, it
is appropriate to appraise the impact and heritage of the book, as well as
the direction of African Literature in the next half-century.

UPDATE: [Cultural-Historical] Haydon, Romanticism, and the Visual Arts: Romantic Painting, Rom. Writing (6/1/2008; 11/7-8/2008)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 7, 2008 - 9:41pm
Julia S. Carlson

CALL FOR PAPERS

Benjamin Robert Haydon, Romanticism, and the Visual Arts: Romantic Painting, Romantic Writing

Plenary speakers:

Nicholas Roe, University of St. Andrews, Scotland
Jeffrey N. Cox, University of Colorado at Boulder
Suzanne Matheson, University of Windsor, Ontario

Conference date: November 7-8, 2008
NEW Proposal date: June 1, 2008

UPDATE: [Romantic] Haydon, Romanticism, and the Visual Arts: Romantic Painting, Rom. Writing (6/1/2008; 11/7-8/2008)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 7, 2008 - 9:39pm
Julia S. Carlson

CALL FOR PAPERS

Benjamin Robert Haydon, Romanticism, and the Visual Arts: Romantic Painting, Romantic Writing

Plenary speakers:

Nicholas Roe, University of St. Andrews, Scotland
Jeffrey N. Cox, University of Colorado at Boulder
Suzanne Matheson, University of Windsor, Ontario

Conference date: November 7-8, 2008
NEW Proposal date: June 1, 2008

CFP: [African-American] African American Women Activists 1890-1940 (5/28/08; SAMLA 11/7-11/9/08)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 7, 2008 - 5:27pm
Julie Cary Nerad

Between 1890 and 1940, Jim Crow segregation entrenched itself across the
American South, while racism grew in the North, fueling race riots and
racial discrimination in all areas of life. However, these decades also saw
the creation of the NAACP, the success of the Harlem Renaissance, and the
birth of those who would become the leaders of the Civil Rights Movement in
the 1960s. Throughout these turbulent decades, Black women were advocating
for Black rights, and especially for women’s rights, and were fighting
against lynching, social and economic discrimination, segregation, and
unequal opportunities for education. Much attention has been rightly paid

CFP: [American] Southern American Studies Association Biennial Conference

updated: 
Wednesday, May 7, 2008 - 12:55am
Eric Gary Anderson

Southern American Studies Association Biennial Meeting
George Mason University
Fairfax, Virginia
February 12-14, 2009

BEGINNINGS AND RENEWALS: LOCATING AMERICAN STUDIES

Keynote Speakers:

Philip Deloria, Univ. of Michigan, ASA President-Elect
Lucy Maddox, Georgetown University

More Information: sasa.gmu.edu

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