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CFP: [20th] Navigating the Body: Spaces, Mapping, and Embodiment

updated: 
Wednesday, November 26, 2008 - 8:57pm
Patrick Abatiell

Navigating the Body: Spaces, Mapping, and Embodiment
University of Virginia Department of English
Graduate-Student Conference

219 Bryan Hall, P.O. Box 400121
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4121

March 20-22, 2009

CFP: [18th] Navigating the Body: Spaces, Mapping, and Embodiment

updated: 
Wednesday, November 26, 2008 - 8:53pm
Patrick Abatiell

Navigating the Body: Spaces, Mapping, and Embodiment
University of Virginia Department of English
Graduate-Student Conference

219 Bryan Hall, P.O. Box 400121
Charlottesville, VA 22904-4121

March 20-22, 2009

CFP: [American] States of Emergency

updated: 
Wednesday, November 26, 2008 - 5:25pm
Bryce Traister

"States of Emergency": November 13-15, 2009
The University of Western Ontario

CFP: [Computing-Internet] "SOCIAL COMPUTING IN 2020" BLUESKY INNOVATION COMPETITION

updated: 
Wednesday, November 26, 2008 - 5:09pm
James Kearney

"SOCIAL COMPUTING IN 2020" BLUESKY INNOVATION COMPETITION

The University of California Transliteracies Project and UC Santa Barbara
Social Computing Group announce the "Social Computing in 2020" Bluesky
Innovation Competition." What will social computing technologies and
practices be like in the year 2020?

* ELIGIBLE: Undergraduate or graduate students anywhere in the world.

* AWARDS: 1st prize, $3000 USD; 2nd prize, $1000, 3rd prize, $500.

* SUBMISSION FORMAT: Description of an idea + Imaginative realization,
embodiment, or illustration of the idea in a variety of possible formats
(e.g., an essay, story, script, application sketch, fictional business
plan, etc.).

CFP: [Graduate] Crisis - Critical Disruption of Communication and Cultural Flows

updated: 
Wednesday, November 26, 2008 - 3:11pm
Ian Dahlman

Original Call for Papers (CFP)
Intersections 2009: Crisis
8th Annual Critical & Creative Graduate Student Conference
Submission Deadline: January 9, 2009.
Conference Date: March 20-22, 2009
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Intersections 2009: Crisis
Critical Disruption of Communication and Cultural Flows

CFP: [Renaissance] Ecofeminist collection, Early Modern Studies

updated: 
Wednesday, November 26, 2008 - 1:35am
Jen Munroe

Nearly thirty years ago, Carolyn Merchant proposed new ways to look at
the various mechanisms that “sanctioned the domination of both nature and
women” (Death of Nature xxi). Today, scholars have made great strides in
locating these mechanisms in various periods and places important to
American, British, and World literatures, but scholars of early modern
literature have yet to consider them at length. Ecocritical studies of
Shakespeare, Milton, and others have challenged the way early modern
scholars understand the relationship between human beings and the natural
world in the period, but these studies still tend to focus on humans in a

UPDATE: [Theory] American Indians Today

updated: 
Wednesday, November 26, 2008 - 12:46am
Richard L. Allen

Call for Papers: American Indians Today
Abstract/Proposals by 15 December 2008
February 25-28, 2009

Southwest/Texas Popular & American Popular Culture Associations 30th
Annual Conference

Albuquerque, NM. February 25-28, 2009
Hyatt Regency Albuquerque
330 Tijeras
Albuquerque, NM 87102
Phone: 1.505.842.1234
Fax: 1.505.766.6710

CFP: [20th] Essay Collection on the Sitwells

updated: 
Tuesday, November 25, 2008 - 10:49pm
Allan Pero

This CFP is for a proposed collection of essays on the works of the
Sitwells. In New Bearings in English Poetry, F.R. Leavis condemned the
Sitwells to "the history of publicity rather than of poetry." However,
the Sitwells, individually and as a trio, were not only significant
contributors to the fields of poetry, fiction, memoir, belles lettres,
art history, travel writing, and biography, they were also key players in
the popularization of Modernism and in the development of "celebrity"
and "scandal" in cultural production. This volume of essays will
contribute to a renewed interest in the Sitwells' work and their place in
the history of Modernism. The editors particularly welcome proposals that

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