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Electronic Editions of Early Modern Drama, RSA Conference, Venice, April 8-10, 2010 (Deadline: May 15, 2009)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2009 - 1:24pm
Brett D. Hirsch, University of Victoria

In his 2007 Shakespeare Survey article, John Jowett commented that "the extent to which scholarly electronic editions will transform Shakespeare study remains to be seen," and that "at the end of the twentieth century" the role of the electronic edition "remained, at most, supplementary to the print edition" (4). This panel seeks to assess Jowett's claim in light of a growing number of projects to produce electronic editions of early modern drama, and to ask whether the electronic edition is still (or indeed, if it ever was) supplementary to the print edition.

cfp The popular in global times (10/11/2009)

updated: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2009 - 12:08pm
Journal Culture, Language and Representation / Jose R. Prado (editor)

CLR Journal (Culture, Language and Representation), ISSN: 1697-7750, seeks contributions for its forthcoming volume to be published, May 2010, on the topic of

The Popular in Global Times

Articles are welcomed that engage with the role of popular culture and the politics of everyday life in shaping new and/or alternative life-styles and cultural spaces in the age of globalization.

Possible suggested topics would include, but are by no means reduced to:

Utopian Spaces of British Literature and Culture, 1890-1945

updated: 
Tuesday, April 28, 2009 - 5:20am
English Faculty, University of Oxford (UK)

From the fin de siècle to the Second World War, the construction of alternative social and private spaces exerted a peculiar fascination for many British writers. The cataclysmic historical events of the period stimulated Utopian thinking and feeling even as they seemed to make them problematic or impossible. At the same time radical demands for new spaces, whether political, religious or aesthetic, also generated new ways of reading and writing the familiar urban and domestic spaces of everyday life.

CFP: Actants / Residue (GEMCS 2009, 10/22-25, Dallas); deadline May 13, 2009

updated: 
Monday, April 27, 2009 - 9:46pm
Lizz Angello / University of South Florida

Self-described "student of science" Bruno Latour defines an actor as "any thing that leaves a trace." In keeping with this year's theme of footprints, this panel welcomes papers that consider the traces left by any thing on the world (whether of humans or non-humans). What buried narratives might we excavate by reading residue? What stories are told by echoes? All approaches are welcome, though eco-critical and material readings may be particularly appropriate. Relevant topics might include:

TYCA-West October 9-10, 2009

updated: 
Monday, April 27, 2009 - 11:00am
Ron Christiansen

Conference theme: Point & Counterpoint: Converging fugues within composition and community

See the TYCA-West website for full CFP: http://tycawest.org/

Place: Sale Lake City

*Low rates for adjunct faculty and graduate students
*Keynote and manuscript workshop by Deborah Holdstein, editor CCC

Ron Christiansen (ron.christiansen@slcc.edu)
Program Chair TYCA-West 2009

Performing Love / Loving Performance: Broadway Musical Motifs in Cinema and Television - First Round Deadline: August 1, 2009

updated: 
Monday, April 27, 2009 - 10:27am
Kathryn Edney/Film & History Conference: Representations of Love in Film and Television

"Performing Love / Loving Performance: Broadway Musical Motifs in Cinema and Television"
2010 Film & History Conference: Representations of Love in Film and Television
November 10-14, 2010
Hyatt Regency Milwaukee
www.uwosh.edu/filmandhistory

First Round Deadline: August 1, 2009

AREA: Performing Love / Loving Performance: Broadway Musical Motifs in Cinema and Television

Reading Ethics in the 21 Century (SAMLA, Nov.6-8, 2009) [UPDATE]

updated: 
Monday, April 27, 2009 - 9:39am
Raina Kostova

SAMLA 2009
Reading Ethics in the 21 Century
Call for Papers
Since Aristotle the understanding of ethics as a branch of philosophy has been defined as a pragmatic rather than a theoretical field: ethics does not simply involve a discussion of virtues, but the practice of "virtual activities." It is concerned, as Sartre later insists, with living "in the world," where one has the individual moral responsibility for the other and for the political structure of society. The personal responsibility to act "ethically" in this case is made possible by the essential freedom of choice of each individual.

Middlebrow Modernists on Youth and Age (5/9; MSA 11/5-11/8)

updated: 
Monday, April 27, 2009 - 3:31am
Cynthia Port

Panel: Middlebrow Modernists on Youth and Age
Conference: MSA 11, Montreal, Canada, Nov 5-8 2009
Deadline: May 9, 2009

The modernist era is often described as a period when an emerging youth culture asserted itself with innovations in literary and aesthetic form. Tension between generations was also, however, a ubiquitous and lucrative theme in popular fiction and journalism. This panel seeks papers on any aspect of this generational divide in middlebrow writing of the period.

Fairy Tale Economies

updated: 
Sunday, April 26, 2009 - 7:52pm
Dr. Molly Clark Hillard: University of Southern Mississippi and Group for International Fairy Tale Studies

Fairy Tale Economies

An interdisciplinary, international conference
October 1—3, 2009
University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg MS

Mindful of our own global economies, this colloquium addresses economies in fantastic literature and culture. We shall identify economy both as a theme within literatures and as a way of thinking about the value of fantastic literature itself.

Re-reading Rider Haggard (1st August)

updated: 
Saturday, April 25, 2009 - 9:45am
John Miller and Robbie McLaughlan/ University of Glasgow

Henry Rider Haggard (1856-1925) was a novelist, country gentleman, social commentator, onetime colonial administrator and failed ostrich farmer whose prodigious output comprises a significant but under-examined contribution to late nineteenth and early twentieth century literature. While his two most famous works, King Solomon's Mines (1886) and She (1887) have attracted a steady stream of articles in recent years, most notably from the fields of postcolonial and gender studies, a significant proportion of his oeuvre remains almost entirely unstudied, despite their considerable popular success in his lifetime. In order to extend and enhance Haggard scholarship we are soliciting proposals for chapters in a forthcoming edited collection of essays.

[UPDATE] States of Crisis - Graduate Conference

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 10:56pm
Brandeis University - Department of English and American Literature

States of Crisis
Friday, 9 October 2009
Brandeis University
Department of English and American Literature
Seventh Annual Graduate Conference

Since its origin in the ancient Greek krisis, "decision," related to krites, a judge, the term crisis has referred to ideas of discernment, evaluation, criticism, and sifting of evidence. In literary studies, for example, one can see moments of crisis in shifting aesthetics and changing genres as well as in literary tradition(s), character representation, and ideas of narrative. Drawing on interdisciplinary approaches and scholarship, this conference will explore different responses to the idea of crisis in the humanities and social sciences.

12th Annual Writing by Degrees Graduate Conference

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 4:20pm
Writing by Degrees / Binghamton University
    Writing By Degrees

is seeking creative and academic submissions demonstrating or contemplating the craft of writing.

Conference Dates: September 24¬–26, 2009.
Submission Deadline: August 1, 2009.

Guidelines: All applicants must be currently enrolled as graduate students in order to be eligible. Submissions may fall into one of the categories below:

    Creative Submissions


Creative prose, fiction, or creative non-fiction should be of a length to be read within a 20-minute period (roughly 10–12 pages). Please submit the entire piece to be read.

Poetry submissions should be 10 pages.

The Beautiful and the Good: Exploring the Beauty Controversy in Contemporary Fiction

updated: 
Friday, April 24, 2009 - 3:32pm
Margaret E. Mitchell

SAMLA 2009: Writers, philosophers and artists have long pondered the relationship between the beautiful and the good. Elaine Scarry's seductive _On Beauty and Being Just_ leaps calmly into the fray, arguing that beauty "actually assists us in the work of addressing justice," thereby establishing a tenuous relationship between beauty and human rights. But the opposing argument--that beauty essentially derails justice, either by distracting or lulling the senses or, more insidiously, by aestheticizing what is dangerous and unjust—-still thrives. This panel welcomes proposals for twenty minute papers on contemporary fictional explorations (whether overt, as in Zadie Smith's _On Beauty_, or implicit) of this controversy.

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