/07

displaying 256 - 270 of 276

The Politics of Nature and Wilderness in the Middle Ages

updated: 
Thursday, July 2, 2009 - 4:32pm
Oregon Medieval English Literature Society

Jennifer Neville's "Representations of the Natural World in Old English Poetry" and Gillian Rudd's "Greenery: Ecocritical Readings of Late Medieval English Literature" are examples of the growing interest in ecocritical readings of medieval literature. The ways medieval writers thought about and interacted with nature and wilderness are important and relevant in regard to other conceptual frames and formulations that governed medieval thought and behavior. Papers in this panel will address the representations of nature in medieval texts as they pertained to and promoted political ideologies and programs of instruction or colonization. Papers on English and Continental literature are welcome.

Liminal Ladies: Porous Women's Bodies in Medieval Literature

updated: 
Thursday, July 2, 2009 - 4:28pm
Oregon Medieval English Literature Society

A common medieval trope in stories of women's misdeeds seems to be their mouths getting them into trouble. In her book "Bodytalk: When Women Speak in Old French Literature," E. Jane Burns cites the vagina as the site of a second producing 'mouth' in fabliaux. Taking this doubling under consideration, the kind of trouble women find themselves in almost invariably involves either speech, consumption of food or drink, or sexual appetite. Regardless of which mouth is opened, the production or reception of materials into or out of their mouths involves crossing bodily boundaries: letting outside matter in, or expelling or revealing inside matter to the outside world.

Call for Replacement Paper, RSA 2010 (Venice)

updated: 
Thursday, July 2, 2009 - 3:45pm
David M. Perry, Dominican University

I am seeking a replacement paper for a panel entitled, "Venice, Identity, and the Eastern Mediterranean," to be held at the Renaissance Society of America annual meeting in 2010, in Venice, Italy, 8-10 April 2010. The session has been accepted, but one participant has had to withdraw. The RSA has kindly agreed to consider a replacement. If you are interested, please contact David Perry for more information. You will be asked to provide a title and a 150-word abstract. The deadline is July 21, 2009.

ECONOMY OF FORM -- Thursday, October 29, 2009

updated: 
Thursday, July 2, 2009 - 11:43am
21st Annual Tufts University English Graduate Organization Conference

Keynote Address: Professor Franco Moretti, Stanford University
Economy can imply plenitude or lack, wisdom or deprivation. Forms impose limits and shape possibilities, provide models and restrict meanings. Lately, the word "economy" has been synonymous with collapse and structural failure. As the world reevaluates the mechanisms of capitalism, we want to take this opportunity to reevaluate our systems of intellectual trade, to interrogate how our ideas are formed and how they function.

[UPDATE] CASTING [SCMS Panel] 8/30/09; 3/17/10-3/21/10; Los Angeles

updated: 
Thursday, July 2, 2009 - 11:29am
Erin Lee Mock

Star Studies shook up auteur-based film criticism by suggesting that actors – through the manipulation of their images by studios, directors, and the stars themselves – were collaborators and instruments in film and media projects.

CFP: Mothering and Migration Conference

updated: 
Thursday, July 2, 2009 - 11:17am
Association for Research on Mothering (ARM) and the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras

CALL FOR PAPERS

Association for Research on Mothering (ARM) and the University of Puerto Rico
are hosting a conference on

Mothering and Migration:
(Trans)nationalisms, Globalization, and Displacement

February 18-20, 2010, University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras, Puerto Rico

Click here to see the full CFP.

27th-28th May 2010

updated: 
Thursday, July 2, 2009 - 7:22am
Varieties of Experience : Views of Modern Warfare

Varieties of Experience : Views of Modern Warfare/

Regards croisés sur les guerres modernes

27th -28th May 2010

Contributions are invited for a conference which will take place at the University of Caen on 27th and 28th May 2010.

Maison de la Recherche en Sciences humaines (MRSH – UMS 843 CNRS)

Université de Caen

Centre de Recherche Littératures et Sociétés Anglaises et Américaines – LSA de l'Equipe de recherche interdisciplinaire sur la Grande-Bretagne, l'Irlande et l'Amérique du Nord – ERIBIA (EA 2610)

[UPDATE] "H.D. and the Image" feature is still seeking submissions of creative and critical work

updated: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2009 - 7:19pm
Jacket

Submissions are currently being accepted for a feature, "H.D. and the Image," which is tentatively scheduled for publication in Jacket. The feature will focus on the relevance of Imagist technique to contemporary poetry, particularly the ways that poets today continue to draw from the Imagist tradition that Hilda Doolittle represented. Doolittle remains a unique figure in 20th century women's poetry, particularly because she continually revised her own definition of Imagist technique in transitioning from early works like Sea Garden to later book such as Helen in Egypt.

[UPDATE] EAPSU Fall Conference, DEADLINE EXTENDED, AUGUST 1, 2009

updated: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2009 - 3:37pm
English Association of Pennsylvania State Universities Conference

The 2009 EAPSU (English Association of Pennsylvania State Universities) Conference will be held at Shippensburg University, October 22-24, 2009. The conference theme is "Making Our World: Language, Literacy and Culture."

DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS EXTENDED TO AUGUST 1, 2009.

We invite proposals from faculty and students for presentations, roundtable discussions, and workshops that address how the work of English studies continues to make and remake our communities, our classrooms, and the world around us. Topics include, but are not limited to: Literatures, Popular Culture & Film, Composition and Pedagogy, and Creative Texts: Fiction, Creative Non-Fiction, and Poetry.

CASTING [SCMS Panel] 7/31/09; 3/17/10-3/21/10; Los Angeles

updated: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2009 - 2:50pm
Erin Lee Mock

Star Studies shook up auteur-based film criticism by suggesting that actors – through the manipulation of their images by studios, directors, and the stars themselves – were both collaborators and instruments in film and media projects. Equally groundbreaking was the claim that a star's importance could stretch beyond a single film. Critical to Star Studies is, of course, the "star": a cultural icon whose image is built through the combination of his filmic catalogue with his biography and extra-filmic output, including product sponsorship, charity work, and interviews. Canonical works of Star Studies focused on figures like Charlie Chaplin, Marilyn Monroe, Paul Robeson, Humphrey Bogart, Clint Eastwood. But what about James Gandolfini or Diane Keaton?

MJ: The Man in the Mirror Analyzed

updated: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2009 - 2:23pm
Itibari M. Zulu

MJ: The Man in the Mirror Analyzed

The life of Michael Joseph Jackson (1958-2009) was extraordinary, to say the least. He was a singer, songwriter, dancer, and cultural icon who become one of the most popular entertainers in the world. His life and work is a combination of talent and contradiction, and as a result, worth detailed investigation. Therefore, we are issuing a call for a special edition on his contribution to the world of entertainment specifically; and human social-political culture in general.

The possible topics include, but are not limited to:

Literature and Rhetoric of the Apocalypse: Atlanta, October 22-24. [Graduate]

updated: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2009 - 11:18am
Georgia State University: New Voices Conference

The 10th Annual New Voices Conference focuses on representations of the Apocalypse as they manifest throughout history, across cultures, and in language. The conference committee invites papers dealing with any aspect of mankind's conception of the End-of-Days. Individual papers or panel proposals may center upon any time period and any culture or people. They may furthermore draw thematically from such academic disciplines as literary criticism and theory, poetry, fiction, philosophy, religious studies, medieval and renaissance studies, art history, biblical history, cultural geography, and folklore.

Fiction Writers (1960 to the Present) and Their Use of Fairy Tales (Sept. 30, 2009; NeMLA April 7-11, 2010)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2009 - 11:10am
Charles Cullum / NeMLA

How and why do fiction writers from the explosively experimental period of 1960 to the present use (subvert, disturb) the seemingly conventional form of the fairy tale? Both American and international writers are drawn to fairy tales. One approach to fairy tales is taken by American metafictionists, who find in them rich mythic patterns to disrupt in order to promote new and different constructions of meaning. Robert Coover, for instance, makes fairy tales the basis of a number of his fictions. In Pricksongs and Descants, Coover plays with characters and motifs from tales about Jack the Giant Killer, Little Red Riding Hood, Beauty and the Beast, and Hansel and Gretel in an exploration of human impulses toward sex, violence, and creativity itself.

Nations of Childhood

updated: 
Wednesday, July 1, 2009 - 10:09am
Björn Sundmark, Malmö University, Sweden

"Nations of childhood" – call for papers

Pages