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UPDATE: [General] Midwest Conference on Literature, Language, and Media (3/20/09)

updated: 
Monday, January 5, 2009 - 4:27am
paul petrovic

Midwest Conference on Literature, Language, and Media (MCLLM) 2009

17th Annual Conference will be held March 20-21, 2009 at Northern
Illinois University in DeKalb, Illinois. Keynote speakers will be Dr.
Salikoko S. Mufwene (The University of Chicago) and Dr. Robert
Dale Parker (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign).

UPDATE: [American] Midwest Conference on Literature, Language, and Media (3/20/09)

updated: 
Monday, January 5, 2009 - 4:26am
paul petrovic

Midwest Conference on Literature, Language, and Media (MCLLM) 2009

17th Annual Conference will be held March 20-21, 2009 at Northern
Illinois University in DeKalb, Illinois. Keynote speakers will be Dr.
Salikoko S. Mufwene (The University of Chicago) and Dr. Robert
Dale Parker (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign).

CFP: [20th] John Steinbeck and War

updated: 
Monday, January 5, 2009 - 12:18am
Paul Douglass

The John Steinbeck Society of America solicits papers for a 2009 MLA
session in Philadelphia, which will be dedicated to the theme of "John
Steinbeck and War." Topics may include, but are not limited to: Steinbeck
and WW II; Steinbeck and Viet Nam; the War on Poverty and Steinbeck;
Propaganda Wars and Steinbeck; Steinbeck and Class Warfare, etc. Send
50-100 word abstract or completed paper to Paul Douglass
(Paul.Douglass_at_sjsu.edu) by March 15, 2009.

CFP: [Collections] The Civil War in American Life and Culture

updated: 
Sunday, January 4, 2009 - 11:28pm
Zoe Trodd

We are seeking contributors for a book called “The Civil War in American
Life and Culture.” The book is under contract with Bruccoli Clark
Layman/Manly, Inc, and will analyze history from a social perspective. It
will provide essential information about daily life in the United States,
using contextualized primary documents to examine people’s unfiltered
attitudes. Contributors will receive $100 for a chapter that consists of
the following two elements: 1. A 3000-5000 word essay introducing and
explaining the topic. 2. A 3000-5000 word selection of primary sources
(for example, oral history, letters, diaries, newspapers, memoirs). The

CFP: [Medieval] Call for Papers â AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples

updated: 
Sunday, January 4, 2009 - 10:37pm
Phoebe Fletcher

Papers due: April 30, 2009

Perhaps one of the most radical challenges posed to Western epistemologies in recent times has
been the rapid growth of indigenous, traditional and aboriginal knowledge in the academy.
Through questioning teleological views of progress and presenting alternative histories,
indigenous perspectives shake the foundations of even the most established of disciplines by
offering other ways of being in this world.

AlterNative welcomes submissions from scholars around the globe engaging with indigenous
issues across all disciplines for its upcoming issue.

CFP: [Romantic] Byron and the Revolutionary Spirit

updated: 
Sunday, January 4, 2009 - 9:39pm
Paul Douglass

The Byron Society of America solicits papers for its 2009 session in
Philadelphia, which will be dedicated to the theme of “Byron and the
Revolutionary Spirit.” Topics may include, but are not limited to: Byron
as Poetic Innovator; Byron and the Greek Revolution; English Bards and
Scotch Reviewers 200 years on; Rebels and Rebellion in Byron’s Narrative
Poetry and Drama; Byron and Nationalist movements in Ireland and Scotland
(or elsewhere). Send abstract of 50-100 words or completed paper to Paul
Douglass (Paul.Douglass_at_sjsu.edu) by March 15, 2009.

UPDATE: [African-American] Submissions: Street Cred: Expanding the Canon of African American Literature

updated: 
Sunday, January 4, 2009 - 8:16pm
Kimberly Collins

The writings by a new cast of African American writers, who write within
the genre known as “Street Lit,” present a space for the African American
scholar to chronicle and offer meaning to these writers’ works and to
assess how these texts represent African American literature. Because
these non-canonized African American writers enjoy the attention of an
excited new readership, it is critical to examine how and where they may
enter the canon of African American literature.

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