[UPDATE] "From Here to Modernity: New Perspectives on Victorian Sensation Fiction," NeMLA (April 7-10, 2011), Rutgers University

full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA), Hosted by Rutgers U, New Brunswick, NJ

There has been a historic tide of scholarship arguing the merits of classic Victorian Sensation texts such as The Woman in White and Lady Audley's Secret . While scholars from Oliphant to Ruskin have added valuable interpretations to the genre by focusing on its Gothic and Romance origins, contemporary critics such as Cvetkovich and Daly have begun probing the frames that closely link Victorian sensation novels to Modernity. This panel will examine the ways in which Victorian Sensation Fiction interacted with Modernity. How did the genre respond to the plethora of late 19th century Parliamentary activity? In what ways did sensation fiction challenge or reflect evolving ideas about gender and identity? How did sensation fiction plots and stylistic devices mirror everyday domestic events in Britain? Panelists will interrogate sensation fiction's relationship to the new art and aestheticism movement, advances in technologies including "iron horses," commercial culture, and Modernity's historical and political events, including Britain's empire project. We will discuss the ways in which sensation fiction seeded later literary movements such as the "New Woman" novels. Panelists will also explore the important implications of this new scholarship in positioning a broader, fresh frame that links the genre of sensation fiction to Modernity.

Panelists should examine specific text(s) that demonstrate literary, historic and cultural links between Sensation Fiction and Modernity (for example: changing gender roles, commercial culture, technology, the arts and the Empire project). 500 word Abstract/CV by 9/30 to Co-chairs Adrienne Munich (Adrienne.Munich@stonybrook.edu) AND Sophie Lavin (blavin@optonline.net) with subject line "NeMLA SenFic Submission."

38086Medical Visions of Modernism--update42nd Annual NeMLA, New Brunswick, NJ at Rutgers Universitymmimran@princeton.edu, mctwo@princeton.edu1282675341cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitymodernist studiesscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: 42nd Annual NeMLA, New Brunswick, NJ at Rutgers Universitycontact email: mmimran@princeton.edu, mctwo@princeton.edu

The emerging disciplines of psychology, neurology, phrenology, and finally psychoanalysis at the end of the nineteenth century supplied the modernist project in literature with new perspectives of the human subject and also with new languages, new idioms and vocabularies with which to describe the structure of subjectivity and its images, perceptions, and sensations. This panel seeks to explore the relationship between emerging medical disciplines and Modernism. We are particularly interested in papers which explore the role of language--and its limits--in articulating illness in literary fiction, medical treatises, and film studies. The panel invites papers that address the following questions: What are the limits of language in communicating sensation, notably pain? How and why do both clinical discourses and fictional narrative rely on poetic tropes to depict the consciousness of the patient and protagonist respectively? How can language serve as both a conduit to a cure and as symptom of illness? In which ways do the languages of the sciences and fiction intersect?

Suggested topics:
The breakdown of the binaries of mental/physical, sensible/intelligible, doctor/patient, madness/genius; the writing of synesthesia and anesthesia; the dream work; non-Saussurean grammars of sensation; the use of metaphors and poetic tropes in the expression of pain in both medical and literary narratives; the language of sensations and the exploring of a 'sixth sense;' Modern literature that meditates on illness and its relation to fiction (Woolf's "On Being Ill"); depictions of pain in film and film theory; the aestheticization of illness (hysteria, neurasthenia, somnambulism) and medical spaces (clinics, asylums, hospitals); illness as a metaphor.

Deadline: September 30, 2010. Please include with your abstract
your name, affiliation, and email address.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitymodernist studiesscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 38087CFP on Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Virus and the ViralExcursions: An Interdisciplinary Journalenquiries@excursions-journal.org.uk1282675387cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisionhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturescience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Excursions: An Interdisciplinary Journalcontact email: enquiries@excursions-journal.org.uk

http://www.excursions-journal.org.uk/cfp.html

The logic of the virus has become endemic. Viral ads mirror contagion to convey their message. Computers and systems are struck down by infections. Pigs and birds are transformed into sinister hosts. Terrorists form cells and virulent covert networks, globalisation becomes a creeping homogenisation attacking the idiosyncratic, and media rapidly evolve to overcome any censorial attempt at information immunisation.

We all live with the virus. Or perhaps, as the planet's most abundant biological entity, the virus lives with us. It crosses boundaries of species and holds genotype in little regard, finding hosts in every form of life. This tenacious agent has escaped the confines of laboratories and medical institutions, and insinuated itself into all strands of our cultural, political, and technological discourses.

Excursions invites submissions that examine the theme of 'Virus', in all its potential interpretations. Submissions may wish to consider, but are by no means limited to:

* The Virus as a model and/or metaphor
* The politics and economics of the pandemic, epidemic and endemic
* Viral dissemination
* The synthetic and the viral
* The viral and systemic vulnerability
* The socio-cultural and scientific history of the virus
* Life, death and the place of the virus in evolution
* Bacteriophages or the good virus
* Contamination and the text/body/performance
* Parasitism vs. viral infection
* Viral hosts and hospitality
* The rhetoric of the virus/viral rhetoric
* Artistic (re)presentations of/responses to virulent virtual media
* What does immunity mean?
* Viral identities – from living with infection to infectious trends
* The antiseptic space

Papers should be between 3,000 and 5,000 words, follow MHRA formatting guidelines and be submitted via the Excursions website. Please contact enquiries@excursions-journal.org.uk regarding other forms of submission (i.e. film, photography, etc). Please include an abstract and a brief biography (no more than 150 words) along with your submission, not later than 30th October 2010.

http://www.excursions-journal.org.uk/cfp.html

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisionhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturescience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 38088[update] Medical Visions of Modernism42nd Annual NeMLA, New Brunswick, NJ at Rutgers Universitymmimran@princeton.edu, mctwo@princeton.edu1282675427cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityfull name / name of organization: 42nd Annual NeMLA, New Brunswick, NJ at Rutgers Universitycontact email: mmimran@princeton.edu, mctwo@princeton.edu

The emerging disciplines of psychology, neurology, phrenology, and finally psychoanalysis at the end of the nineteenth century supplied the modernist project in literature with new perspectives of the human subject and also with new languages, new idioms and vocabularies with which to describe the structure of subjectivity and its images, perceptions, and sensations. This panel seeks to explore the relationship between emerging medical disciplines and Modernism. We are particularly interested in papers which explore the role of language--and its limits--in articulating illness in literary fiction, medical treatises, and film studies. The panel invites papers that address the following questions: What are the limits of language in communicating sensation, notably pain? How and why do both clinical discourses and fictional narrative rely on poetic tropes to depict the consciousness of the patient and protagonist respectively? How can language serve as both a conduit to a cure and as symptom of illness? In which ways do the languages of the sciences and fiction intersect?

Suggested topics:
The breakdown of the binaries of mental/physical, sensible/intelligible, doctor/patient, madness/genius; the writing of synesthesia and anesthesia; the dream work; non-Saussurean grammars of sensation; the use of metaphors and poetic tropes in the expression of pain in both medical and literary narratives; the language of sensations and the exploring of a 'sixth sense;' Modern literature that meditates on illness and its relation to fiction (Woolf's "On Being Ill"); depictions of pain in film and film theory; the aestheticization of illness (hysteria, neurasthenia, somnambulism) and medical spaces (clinics, asylums, hospitals); illness as a metaphor.

Deadline: September 30, 2010. Please include with your abstract
your name, affiliation, and email address.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexuality 38090CFP on Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Virus and the ViralExcursions: An Interdisciplinary Journalenquiries@excursions-journal.org.uk1282675666cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisionhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturescience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Excursions: An Interdisciplinary Journalcontact email: enquiries@excursions-journal.org.uk

http://www.excursions-journal.org.uk/cfp.html

The logic of the virus has become endemic. Viral ads mirror contagion to convey their message. Computers and systems are struck down by infections. Pigs and birds are transformed into sinister hosts. Terrorists form cells and virulent covert networks, globalisation becomes a creeping homogenisation attacking the idiosyncratic, and media rapidly evolve to overcome any censorial attempt at information immunisation.

We all live with the virus. Or perhaps, as the planet's most abundant biological entity, the virus lives with us. It crosses boundaries of species and holds genotype in little regard, finding hosts in every form of life. This tenacious agent has escaped the confines of laboratories and medical institutions, and insinuated itself into all strands of our cultural, political, and technological discourses.

Excursions invites submissions that examine the theme of 'Virus', in all its potential interpretations. Submissions may wish to consider, but are by no means limited to:

* The Virus as a model and/or metaphor
* The politics and economics of the pandemic, epidemic and endemic
* Viral dissemination
* The synthetic and the viral
* The viral and systemic vulnerability
* The socio-cultural and scientific history of the virus
* Life, death and the place of the virus in evolution
* Bacteriophages or the good virus
* Contamination and the text/body/performance
* Parasitism vs. viral infection
* Viral hosts and hospitality
* The rhetoric of the virus/viral rhetoric
* Artistic (re)presentations of/responses to virulent virtual media
* What does immunity mean?
* Viral identities – from living with infection to infectious trends
* The antiseptic space

Papers should be between 3,000 and 5,000 words, follow MHRA formatting guidelines and be submitted via the Excursions website at
http://www.excursions-journal.org.uk/cfp.html
Please contact enquiries@excursions-journal.org.uk regarding other forms of submission (i.e. film, photography, etc). Please include an abstract and a brief biography (no more than 150 words) along with your submission, not later than 30th October 2010.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisionhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturescience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 38091CFP on Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Virus and the ViralExcursions: An Interdisciplinary Journalenquiries@excursions-journal.org.uk1282675750cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisionhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Excursions: An Interdisciplinary Journalcontact email: enquiries@excursions-journal.org.uk

http://www.excursions-journal.org.uk/cfp.html

The logic of the virus has become endemic. Viral ads mirror contagion to convey their message. Computers and systems are struck down by infections. Pigs and birds are transformed into sinister hosts. Terrorists form cells and virulent covert networks, globalisation becomes a creeping homogenisation attacking the idiosyncratic, and media rapidly evolve to overcome any censorial attempt at information immunisation.

We all live with the virus. Or perhaps, as the planet's most abundant biological entity, the virus lives with us. It crosses boundaries of species and holds genotype in little regard, finding hosts in every form of life. This tenacious agent has escaped the confines of laboratories and medical institutions, and insinuated itself into all strands of our cultural, political, and technological discourses.

Excursions invites submissions that examine the theme of 'Virus', in all its potential interpretations. Submissions may wish to consider, but are by no means limited to:

* The Virus as a model and/or metaphor
* The politics and economics of the pandemic, epidemic and endemic
* Viral dissemination
* The synthetic and the viral
* The viral and systemic vulnerability
* The socio-cultural and scientific history of the virus
* Life, death and the place of the virus in evolution
* Bacteriophages or the good virus
* Contamination and the text/body/performance
* Parasitism vs. viral infection
* Viral hosts and hospitality
* The rhetoric of the virus/viral rhetoric
* Artistic (re)presentations of/responses to virulent virtual media
* What does immunity mean?
* Viral identities – from living with infection to infectious trends
* The antiseptic space

Papers should be between 3,000 and 5,000 words, follow MHRA formatting guidelines and be submitted via the Excursions website at
http://www.excursions-journal.org.uk/cfp.html
Please contact enquiries@excursions-journal.org.uk regarding other forms of submission (i.e. film, photography, etc). Please include an abstract and a brief biography (no more than 150 words) along with your submission, not later than 30th October 2010.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesfilm_and_televisionhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 38092[update] Medical Visions of Modernism42nd Annual NeMLA, New Brunswick, NJ at Rutgers Universitymmimran@princeton.edu, mctwo@princeton.edu1282675822cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisionmodernist studiesscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: 42nd Annual NeMLA, New Brunswick, NJ at Rutgers Universitycontact email: mmimran@princeton.edu, mctwo@princeton.edu

The emerging disciplines of psychology, neurology, phrenology, and finally psychoanalysis at the end of the nineteenth century supplied the modernist project in literature with new perspectives of the human subject and also with new languages, new idioms and vocabularies with which to describe the structure of subjectivity and its images, perceptions, and sensations. This panel seeks to explore the relationship between emerging medical disciplines and Modernism. We are particularly interested in papers which explore the role of language--and its limits--in articulating illness in literary fiction, medical treatises, and film studies. The panel invites papers that address the following questions: What are the limits of language in communicating sensation, notably pain? How and why do both clinical discourses and fictional narrative rely on poetic tropes to depict the consciousness of the patient and protagonist respectively? How can language serve as both a conduit to a cure and as symptom of illness? In which ways do the languages of the sciences and fiction intersect?

Suggested topics:
The breakdown of the binaries of mental/physical, sensible/intelligible, doctor/patient, madness/genius; the writing of synesthesia and anesthesia; the dream work; non-Saussurean grammars of sensation; the use of metaphors and poetic tropes in the expression of pain in both medical and literary narratives; the language of sensations and the exploring of a 'sixth sense;' Modern literature that meditates on illness and its relation to fiction (Woolf's "On Being Ill"); depictions of pain in film and film theory; the aestheticization of illness (hysteria, neurasthenia, somnambulism) and medical spaces (clinics, asylums, hospitals); illness as a metaphor.

Deadline: September 30, 2010. Please include with your abstract
your name, affiliation, and email address.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisionmodernist studiesscience_and_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 38093UPDATE: Gender and the Dynamics of Marriage in Medieval English LiteratureDebbie Killingsworth / University of Oregondebbiek@uorengon.edu1282678382gender_studies_and_sexualitymedievalpoetryfull name / name of organization: Debbie Killingsworth / University of Oregoncontact email: debbiek@uorengon.edu

Representations of marriage pervade Medieval Literature and often these literary representations differ from the religious and/or secular expectations of this sort of relationship. Papers for the proposed session could explore:
• the gendered power dynamics within marriage
• the implications of marriage within the chivalric courtly tradition
• the insinuations regarding the reality of social attitudes regarding women
• the use of marriage as a metaphor to investigate the power dynamics within the larger societal institutions.

Abstracts between 250-300 words for papers of 15 minutes are invited by 31 August 2010. The abstract should also include a 50-word biographical note and AV requests.

Contact: Debbie Killingsworth, University of Oregon, Department of English, debbiek@uoregon.edu

cfp categories: gender_studies_and_sexualitymedievalpoetry 38094Persons and Things: a Roundtable in Memorial to Barbara JohnsonNEMLA Convention April 2010henebry@bu.edu1282684861african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarytheoryfull name / name of organization: NEMLA Convention April 2010contact email: henebry@bu.edu

In celebration of the life and work of Barbara Johnson, we will focus on one of her last books and its significance for fields ranging from law to film to the history of art. The essays in Persons and Things bring together concerns from throughout Johnson's career, and we will ponder her lifetime impact on criticism. She provokes us to reconsider the self-evident yet slippery difference between persons and mere objects, how 'non-life seems to lie behind what is considered most deeply human.' Abstracts are due September 30 and can be emailed directly to Charles Henebry, Boston University, henebry@bu.edu

http://www.nemla.org/convention/2011/cfp.html#cfp11320

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarytheory 38095Annual Writers' Festival, February 17-19 2010University of Mary Hardin-Baylordrjessicahooten@gmail.com1282685151general_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetryprofessional_topicsfull name / name of organization: University of Mary Hardin-Baylorcontact email: drjessicahooten@gmail.com

This year the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor's Writer's Festival will include panels on the relationship between faith and fiction or faith and poetry. We invite artists, scholars, teachers, or graduate students of creative writing to submit 300-500 word abstracts for paper presentations on the role of faith in the artist's life or work, critiques of contemporary faith-inspired artists, or any other relevant topic. Also, we are accepting proposals on pedagogical methods for teaching creative writing. What are practical assignments that have worked well to inspire students? What obstacles do 21st century writers face? How have you taught students to succeed in the face of new challenges? Or other relevant topics.

cfp categories: general_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetryprofessional_topics 38096Kalamazoo 2011: Gif me se witega ne leag: Probing the Critical Past, Present, and Future of Old English Wisdom LiteratureKarl Persson, University of British Columbiakaepersson@hotmail.com1282692799classical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalpoetrypostcolonialreligiontheoryfull name / name of organization: Karl Persson, University of British Columbiacontact email: kaepersson@hotmail.com

Since Morton Bloomfield's initial identification of wisdom as an under-discussed category in Old English literature, two critical responses have emerged. On one hand, numerous critics have proven him right by taking his suggestion in a variety of fruitful critical directions; such critics include T. A. Shippey, Elaine Tuttle Hansen, Susan Deskis, Carolyne Larrington, Paul Cavill, and T. D. Hill. On the other hand, these critics' extended discussion of wisdom literature, while it has done much to help us understand some of the more obscure Anglo-Saxon poetry, has also underscored the immense difficulties in undertaking such discussion; the corpus of wisdom literature varies from critic to critic, with Shippey including some of the so-called elegiac poetry, Hansen including the calendric Menologium, and Deskis extending the wisdom discussion into Beowulf. Moreover, the field remains quietly divided by the question of whether the study of wisdom literature should be confined to that literature which adheres strictly to formal proverbial form (Deskis and Cavill), or whether it should be opened up to include passages and works that are not strictly proverbial, but that seem to evince a wisdom "tone" or "mood" (Hansen and Shippey). Thus, if scholars have realized the immense importance of this category for the study of Old English literature, they have also had ample opportunity to learn what Maxims II wryly asserts, that "soð bið swicolost" (truth is most elusive). There is still, therefore, much work to be done in this field, and many issues that require clarification

According to Shippey's concept of "proverbiousness," the Old English wisdom tradition itself consists in dialogic exchanges between past, present, and future concerns, and involves neither slavish iteration of dead sententia, nor a clean break with the past in the name of an ostensible and too quickly lauded progress; instead it shows respect for traditional sapience even as it brings such sapience into dialogue with pressing concerns of the present. Thus, in the spirit of this tradition, I propose a session with dual objectives: to recognize and discuss the contributions of scholars that have gone before us in the study of Old English wisdom literature, but also to ask what it means for us to be heirs of this critical tradition as Twenty-First Century scholars.

Scholars are invited to submit papers on any subjects dealing with either or both of these objectives, including but not limited to responses to the following questions:

How unique is Anglo-Saxon wisdom literature against the backdrop of world wisdom literature? How unique is it in terms of other cultural wisdom traditions (e. g. classical and biblical) that may have influenced it?

After post-structuralism, must wisdom be interpreted as a form of power-knowledge or logocentrism? If not, what are the alternatives?

Is wisdom literature a mode of literature, a genre, or something else entirely? To what degree can we classify literature as "wisdom" without mapping modern classifications onto medieval (con)texts? To what degree is such ostensible objectivity desirable?

cfp categories: classical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalpoetrypostcolonialreligiontheory 38097Italian 'famiglia' Representations in Cinema and Television42nd Annual Convention Northeast Modern Language Associationciski77@eden.rutgers.edu1282704923cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencestwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: 42nd Annual Convention Northeast Modern Language Associationcontact email: ciski77@eden.rutgers.edu

In order to talk about Italy, one almost invariably must talk about family. This panel aims to focus on Italian family as a fluid, multi-layered theme in Italian and Italian-American cinema and television, and probe its various representations: traditional families, extended families, cross-national families, same gender families, adoptive families and all the different family figures that populate them. Please send 250-300 word abstracts to Francesco Pascuzzi, ciski77@eden.rutgers.edu.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygraduate_conferencestwentieth_century_and_beyond 38098CFP: Film, Television, and Literature at CEA 2011 (11/1/2010, 3/31-4/2/2011)Javier Ramirez / College English Associationjavramir@imail.iu.edu1282709627african-americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culturereligionfull name / name of organization: Javier Ramirez / College English Associationcontact email: javramir@imail.iu.edu

Call for Papers, CEA 2011 | FORTUNES
42nd Annual Conference | March 31 - April 2, 2011 | St. Petersburg, Florida
The Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront, 333 First Street South, St. Petersburg, Florida 33701; (727) 894-5000

Submission deadline: November 1, 2010 at http://cea-web.org/

The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations for our 42nd annual conference. This year, we explore the theme of fortunes. Some of the issues we are interested in investigating are: How do film and television challenge and/or reinforce issues of class, politics, and poverty in American culture? To what extent do film and television fortune narratives express opinions on race, ethnic representations, immigration, religion, and culture identities? How has film and television responded to the future of racism, sexism, and homophobia? With the recent success of Fox's Glee, ABC's Modern Family, and Lisa Cholodenko's The Kids Are All Right (2010), how has the increase of lesbian and gay narratives and characters in film and television shaped the visibility of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered (LGBT) issues as well as addressed the concerns of gender and sexuality? How do emerging technologies in cinema, like James Cameron's Avatar (2009) and Chris Nolan's Inception (2010), transform Hollywood productions? To what effect has the 3D boom influenced marketing strategies and altered moviegoing experiences? How have creative and imaginative filmmakers revolutionized Hollywood? Topics are not limited to these questions. While we are especially interested in proposals addressing the conference theme and/or pedagogy, all proposals will be considered.

Submission: August 15 - November 1, 2010
Please see the submission instructions at http://cea-web.org/

Conference Theme: Fortunes
Money, luck, friendship, health, a warm place to sleep. In a world staggered by economic decline and natural catastrophes, what are the new boundaries of success and misfortune? How do art, literature, and the classroom respond to the Rota Fortunae? For our 2011 meeting, CEA invites papers and panels that explore Fortune as both a daunting challenge and an elusive ideal. For more information, please see the full CFP at http://cea-web.org/

General Call for Papers
CEA also welcomes proposals for presentations in any of the areas English departments typically encompass, including literature, creative writing, composition, technical communication, linguistics, and film. We also welcome papers on areas that influence our work as academics, including student demographics, student/instructor accountability and assessment, student advising, academic leadership in departments and programs, and the place of the English department in the university.

Membership
All presenters at the 2011 CEA conference must become members of CEA by January 1, 2011. To join CEA, please go to http://cea-web.org/

More information
* Get short, timely messages from CEA via Twitter: http://twitter.com/CEAtweet
* Connect with CEA on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CollegeEnglishAssociation
* Find out more about conference lodging and registration: http://cea-web.org/
* Contact CEA officers: http://cea-web.org/

Other questions? Please email cea.english@gmail.com.

Sincerely,

Javier Ramirez
Film, Television, and Literature Area Chair
Department of Communication and Culture
Indiana University
800 East Third Street
Bloomington, IN 47405
javramir@imail.iu.edu

cfp categories: african-americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitypopular_culturereligion 38099Muses India: Dis(-)covering Indian English Literature, an anthologyChetan Deshmanedausche@gmail.com1282719868cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Chetan Deshmanecontact email: dausche@gmail.com

MUSES INDIA: DIS(-)COVERING INDIAN ENGLISH LITERATURE is a proposed anthology on Indian English Literature and seeks scholarly essays on its various aspects from postcolonial/postmodernist perspectives. Of more interest are essays on Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni,Amitav Ghosh, Toru Dutt, Sujata Bhatt, Rohington Mistry, Bapsi Sidhwa, Uma Parameswaran. Theoretical essays discussing issues like hybridity, cultural struggle, diaspora and its existence, cosmopolitanism, globalization etc with respect to Indian English literature are also welcome. All manuscripts must conform to MLA style, have end notes and works cited, be without sparators, and typed double spaced in Times New Roman of 12 fontsize. They should also follow American English and punctuation style. The manuscripts are to be sent to Dr. Chetan Deshmane on dausche@gmail.com. The last date for manuscript submission is 30 November 2010.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspostcolonialtheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 38100Spectacles and Things: Visual and Material Culture and/in Neo-Victorianism - Call for Contributions (deadline 30 December 2010)Dr. Nadine Boehm, Dr. Susanne Gruss, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nurembergnadine.boehm [at] angl.phil.uni-erlangen.de, susanne.gruss [at] angl.phil.uni-erlangen.de1282720266film_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturescience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Dr. Nadine Boehm, Dr. Susanne Gruss, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nurembergcontact email: nadine.boehm [at] angl.phil.uni-erlangen.de, susanne.gruss [at] angl.phil.uni-erlangen.de

Neo-Victorian Studies invites essays for a 2011 special issue which aims to investigate a hitherto under-explored aspect of neo-Victorianism: visual and material culture and the complex relationship between the twentieth/twenty-first and nineteenth centuries in neo-Victorian products and productions.

Deadline for submission of completed papers: 30 December 2010

The re-entry of the nineteenth century into twentieth- and twenty-first-century culture tends to be both highly visual and material, making its appearance, as it does, on a contemporary capitalist market and packaged to appeal to a wide consumer base. Neo-Victorian visuality and materiality take centre stage on numerous levels, ranging from memory as haunting, ghostly appearances and inter¬textualities, and biofiction of iconic figures from the period, through prevalent tropes of photography, microscopes, dioramas, exhibition and museum spaces, to the construction of scopic and panoptic regimes, as well as complex narratological perspectives. Processes of marketing and consuming Victoriana likewise pertain to the visual, as do constructions of an academic point of view that seeks to understand the relationship between the nineteenth-century past and the contemporary moment in terms of re-vision.

Literary descriptions of the Nineteenth Century, as well as cultural presentifications (Gumbrecht) of all things Victorian, try to make the past as tangible as possible – via depictions or reproductions of Victorian interiors and fashions, steampunk culture, or re-enactments of one-time living conditions – presenting the Nineteenth Century in commodity form. Theoretical approaches to this current renegotiation of the past include deconstructionist theorisations and Marxist approaches such as Cultural Materialism, which deem the neo-Victorian project deeply ideological, since it allegedly fetishises Victorian culture and nourishes a nostalgia for the values, social structures and accomplishments of the past.

Possible topics include (but are not limited to):
• materialism, commodity culture, and consumerism
• the world of the senses
• neo-Victorian representations of painting and other visual arts
• fetishised objects: collections and exhibitions
• fashion
• scientific vision and the physical world
• photography and image culture
• other ways of seeing: spiritualism and spectrality
• comics and graphic novels
• film and TV series

This special issue derives from the international conference "Fashioning the Neo-Victorian: Iterations of the 19th Century in Contemporary Literature and Culture" (April 2010, Erlangen, Germany), but is not limited to submissions by conference participants. Articles between 6000-8000 words should be submitted by e-mail Word Document attachment to the guest editors Nadine Boehm (nadine.boehm [at] angl.phil.uni-erlangen.de) and Susanne Gruss (susanne.gruss [at] angl.phil.uni-erlangen.de), with a further copy to the General Editor, Marie-Luise Kohlke (neovictorianstudies [at] swansea.ac.uk). Please address enquiries or expressions of interest to the guest editors. For submission guidelines, please consult the journal website (www.neovictorianstudies.com).

cfp categories: film_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturescience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 38101update ISLE-2 June 17-21, 2011International Society for the Linguistics of Englishisle2wtp1282742211general_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencestheoryfull name / name of organization: International Society for the Linguistics of Englishcontact email: isle2wtp

The theme of the conference will be Methods Past and Current.

Recent studies in corpus linguistics, varieties and typologies, dialects and Standard English, as well as pragmatics prompt examination of methods found conducive to promising results. The choice of the conference's theme stems from the widely shared view that methods of analysis involve at least the following related questions:

* How do methods of investigation take into account the data under study?
* In what ways do linguistic premises, perspectives, and models shape the methods to use?
* Which methods and models, developed in such disciplines as anthropology, cultural and demographic history, economics, psychology, and textual editing enhance linguistic analysis?
Do current methods depart in significant ways from those typical of research in the past.

More particular subthemes might include:

* For studies in corpus linguistics, diverse methods for investigating and analyzing regional, social, and cultural patterns in dialects, varieties, and Standard English.
* Under the topic typology, analyses of metrics from Old to Modern English, dialects and varieties, written and oral registers, and optimality theory as applied to sound change.
* From the perspective of reception, methodological designs for perceptual dialectology.
* For the topic pragmatics, discussion of current methods that are used to determine and explain patterns and changes in the linguistic features of spoken and written English.

The theme and topics presented here outline but by no means exhaust the scope of proposals for talks, poster sessions, and workshops that the New England Committee invites for ISLE 2011. Although this outline of theme and topic is central to the Boston meeting, ISLE will accommodate, as much as possible, outstanding abstracts directed toward other issues. The conference in Boston aims to provide an ample forum for members' presentations and exchanges, formal and informal, on a wide range of topics.

cfp categories: general_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencestheory 38102Literary Darwinism and Social Justice (Sept. 19) (April 7-10 2011) [UPDATE]NeMLAwilliams@kutztown.edu1282744972americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centurygender_studies_and_sexualitymedievalmodernist studiespoetryrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: NeMLAcontact email: williams@kutztown.edu

Call for Papers

Literary Darwinism and Social Justice Panel

42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
April 7-10, 2011
New Brunswick, NY – Hyatt New Brunswick
Host Institution: Rutgers University

In recent years, Literary Darwinism has made rapid advances as a methodology for literary exploration with many seeing it as potentially "the next big thing." This panel addresses an important issue in the field that arises specifically out of the contrast between Literary Darwinism, and Post-Modern methods of criticism that focus on culture and cultural constructs. Many in literary studies see the promotion of social justice as a major goal of both their scholarship and pedagogy. This session addresses the question of how Literary Darwinism as a methodology is, or could be, consistent with the long held goal of many in literary studies to create better citizens, defeat harmful stereotypes, and, generally, to promote greater social justice. As we move forward in the twenty-first century, Literary Darwinism appears destined to play a prominent role in literary criticism. This panel seeks to further clarify the nature of that role.

In relation to literature, of course, topics may include but are not limited to,
• Misappropriations of Darwinism
• Tensions between the cultural and the universal
• Self-awareness
• The centrality of competition to survival
• The adaptive value of cooperation
• The adaptive value of empathy
• Environmental elements of adaptability
• Essentialism
• Biology and culture

Broadly theoretical papers, papers addressing pedagogy, or treatments of specific texts are welcome. Email 250-300 word abstracts to Todd O. Williams. williams@kutztown.edu

Deadline: September 19, 2010

Please include with your abstract:

Name and Affiliation
Email address
Postal address
Telephone number
A/V requirements (if any; $10 handling fee with registration)

The 42nd Annual Convention will feature approximately 360 sessions, as well as dynamic speakers and cultural events. Details and the complete Call for Papers for the 2011 Convention will be posted in June: www.nemla.org.

Interested participants may submit abstracts to more than one NeMLA session; however panelists can only present one paper (panel or seminar). Convention participants may present a paper at a panel and also present at a creative session or participate in a roundtable. Do not accept a slot if you may cancel to present on another session.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centurygender_studies_and_sexualitymedievalmodernist studiespoetryrenaissanceromanticscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 38103Call for Papers: Literature Pedagogy at CEA 2011College English Associationjeraldine.kraver@unco.edu1282746999general_announcementsinterdisciplinaryprofessional_topicsfull name / name of organization: College English Associationcontact email: jeraldine.kraver@unco.edu

Call for Papers, CEA 2011 | FORTUNES
42nd Annual Conference | March 31 - April 2, 2011 | St. Petersburg, Florida
The Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront, 333 First Street South, St. Petersburg, Florida 33701; (727) 894-5000

Submission deadline: November 1, 2010 at http://cea-web.org/

The College English Association, a congenial gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations for our 42nd annual conference.

Conference Theme: Fortunes
Money, luck, friendship, health, a warm place to sleep. In a world staggered by economic decline and natural catastrophes, what are the new boundaries of success and misfortune? How do art, literature, and the classroom respond to the Rota Fortunae? For our 2011 meeting, CEA invites papers and panels that explore Fortune as both a daunting challenge and an elusive ideal. For more information, please see the full CFP at http://cea-web.org/

SPECIAL TOPIC: Literature Pedagogy. We enjoy papers or panels that address how we, as teachers, present to our students the multiple genres and modes, or the canonical and contemporary texts, that we call "literature." What approaches work? What successes or challenges have you faced? The ideal paper/panel suggests methods that are applicable to a variety of texts, rather than a single work. We also welcome teacher educators to share how they are addressing issues of literature pedagogy with pre-service teachers in an environment where teachers must address both literature and composition in the same classroom. Papers or panels can address either the conference theme of Fortunes or the General Call described below.

Submission: August 15 - November 1, 2010
Please see the submission instructions at http://cea-web.org/

General Call for Papers
CEA also welcomes proposals for presentations in any of the areas English departments typically encompass, including literature, creative writing, composition, technical communication, linguistics, and film. We also welcome papers on areas that influence our work as academics, including student demographics, student/instructor accountability and assessment, student advising, academic leadership in departments and programs, and the place of the English department in the university.

Membership
All presenters at the 2011 CEA conference must become members of CEA by January 1, 2011. To join CEA, please go to http://cea-web.org/

More information
* Get short, timely messages from CEA via Twitter: http://twitter.com/CEAtweet
* Connect with CEA on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CollegeEnglishAssociation
* Find out more about conference lodging and registration: http://cea-web.org/
* Contact CEA officers: http://cea-web.org/

Other questions? Please email cea.english@gmail.com.

Sincerely,

Dr. Jeri Kraver
University of Northern Colorado
Jeraldine.Kraver@unco.edu

cfp categories: general_announcementsinterdisciplinaryprofessional_topics 38104Call for Papers: Teacher Education at CEA 2011College English Associationjeraldine.kraver@unco.edu1282747144general_announcementsfull name / name of organization: College English Associationcontact email: jeraldine.kraver@unco.edu

Call for Papers, CEA 2011 | FORTUNES
42nd Annual Conference | March 31 - April 2, 2011 | St. Petersburg, Florida
The Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront, 333 First Street South, St. Petersburg, Florida 33701; (727) 894-5000

Submission deadline: November 1, 2010 at http://cea-web.org/

The College English Association, a congenial gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations for our 42nd annual conference.

Conference Theme: Fortunes
Money, luck, friendship, health, a warm place to sleep. In a world staggered by economic decline and natural catastrophes, what are the new boundaries of success and misfortune? How do art, literature, and the classroom respond to the Rota Fortunae? For our 2011 meeting, CEA invites papers and panels that explore Fortune as both a daunting challenge and an elusive ideal. For more information, please see the full CFP at http://cea-web.org/

SPECIAL TOPIC: Teacher Education. English Department enrollments are swelling with students seeking licensure to teach secondary English. We are very interested in exploring this aspect of "English" at CEA. Therefore, tell us about how you, as a content expert or a teacher educator, are meeting the needs of teacher candidates? What must they know to succeed in the classroom? How can we balance English/Language Arts content and "the 'ed' side" of teacher preparation? How does your school address teacher education? Who controls the teaching methods courses? What approaches work? What successes or challenges have you faced? The ideal paper/panel balances theories of teaching and learning with and practical classroom practices. Papers or panels can address either the conference theme of Fortunes or the General Call described below.

Submission: August 15 - November 1, 2010
Please see the submission instructions at http://cea-web.org/

General Call for Papers
CEA also welcomes proposals for presentations in any of the areas English departments typically encompass, including literature, creative writing, composition, technical communication, linguistics, and film. We also welcome papers on areas that influence our work as academics, including student demographics, student/instructor accountability and assessment, student advising, academic leadership in departments and programs, and the place of the English department in the university.

Membership
All presenters at the 2011 CEA conference must become members of CEA by January 1, 2011. To join CEA, please go to http://cea-web.org/

More information
* Get short, timely messages from CEA via Twitter: http://twitter.com/CEAtweet
* Connect with CEA on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CollegeEnglishAssociation
* Find out more about conference lodging and registration: http://cea-web.org/
* Contact CEA officers: http://cea-web.org/

Other questions? Please email cea.english@gmail.com.

Sincerely,

Dr. Jeri Kraver
University of Northern Colorado
Jeraldine.Kraver@unco.edu

cfp categories: general_announcements 38105Affect and Periodization: Rethinking the Long 19th CenturyJustin Rogers-Cooper & Neil Meyer / NEMLA: Northeast Modern Language Associationjustinrogerscooper@gmail.com, NMeyer@gc.cuny.edu1282750636americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarytheoryvictorianfull name / name of organization: Justin Rogers-Cooper & Neil Meyer / NEMLA: Northeast Modern Language Associationcontact email: justinrogerscooper@gmail.com, NMeyer@gc.cuny.edu

Brian Massumi writes that affect is "ever on the move from situation to situation." This observation might also describe the use of affect in contemporary scholarship, and raises question around periodization and the stable categories we use in our discipline to demarcate historical boundaries.

This panel seeks to investigate the parameters of the increasing scholastic interest in affect by situating it at the intersection of Early and post-Civil War American literature. We'd like the panel to consider how theorizing affect might replace, subvert, or change the boundaries of such periodization by using the "long nineteenth-century" as a way to think through their possible continuities. Does examining the representation of affects in literary texts comfortably map onto our understanding of U.S. historical and cultural boundaries? As an emerging methodology, does it disrupt or alter the historical narratives in our field?

We seek papers that address these issues through readings of relevant literary texts and/or through papers that address the concept of affect more broadly, since a synthetic move to integrate or resist the various affective turns (queer, Spinozist) is also at the very center of our theoretical inquiry.

The submission deadline is September 30th.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarytheoryvictorian 38106[UPDATE]The Atrium: A Journal of Academic Voices. Ivy Tech Community College of Indiananriecken@ivytech.edu1282758692americanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_cultureprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Ivy Tech Community College of Indianacontact email: nriecken@ivytech.edu

Current Deadline: January 1, 2011. The Atrium: A Journal of Academic Voices presents a unique forum for the community of professionals engaged in post secondary education and research. We seek both creative writing (short stories and poetry) and academic articles (both narrative and research) that invite discussion across the disciplines. We also publish book and website reviews. The Atrium intends to be a passageway of ideas and practice across the disciplines. There is a murky landscape that practitioners must traverse on their way from Learning Theory to Instructional Practice: we seek papers that describe best practices and student engagement of controversial topics. Accepting the possibility that no theory is panacea, The Atrium acknowledges the value of discourse in the project of uncovering the principles that might govern the development of Best Practices.
The Atrium is a publication of Ivy Tech Community College, the largest college system in Indiana. It encourages communication across disciplines and between two and four year colleges. Articles published will be those with the greatest appeal to a broad range of disciplines. Articles focusing on practice are especially encouraged. The Atrium is published electronically semiannually in Fall and Spring semesters. Deadline for submissions is July 1 and January 1. Published work is archived on the website.
For submission guidelines, a link to our website, FAQs, and e-mail submissions, please go to http://nwi.ivytech.edu/atrium/ For questions not addressed on the website, please contact the general editor, Nancy Riecken, at nriecken@ivytech.edu.

cfp categories: americanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrypopular_cultureprofessional_topicsrhetoric_and_compositiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 38107Hando No Kuzushi - Asian American Literature E-ZineHando No Kuzushi Quinata.Delgado@gmail.com1282767625americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialfull name / name of organization: Hando No Kuzushi contact email: Quinata.Delgado@gmail.com

Hando No Kuzushi, an online literary journal, is gearing up for its third issue, tentatively scheduled to be posted at the end of September. We are seeking poetry, short works of fiction and non-fiction - and even academic essays - that pertain to the Asian American experience in 21st Century America. There is no set deadline.

For a better idea of what we are looking for, visit our website at hnkuzushi.blogspot.com. A judo term, Hando No Kuzushi denotes the unsettling of balance through reaction. That sounds about right to us...

All submissions must be emailed to Quinata.Delgado@gmail.com. We will do our best to respond within a few days.

Thanks!

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonial 38108"Interdisciplinary Studies and Women Modernists" Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) 7-10 April, 2011. Laurel Harris, CUNY Graduate Centerlaurel_e_harris@yahoo.com1282771868gender_studies_and_sexualitymodernist studiestwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Laurel Harris, CUNY Graduate Centercontact email: laurel_e_harris@yahoo.com

In her recent anthology _Gender in Modernism_, Bonnie Kime Scott opens the literary field to include disciplines previously left out of the modernist frame such as dance, painting, cinema, and the sciences. In doing so, Scott broadens the scope of modernism and, in particular, provides new angles of inquiry into the work of women literary modernists. This panel will further explore this interdisciplinary move, asking how, and to what effect, we might bring the insights of other disciplines to bear on questions of gender in literary modernism. How did visual, aural, and performative art forms influence the work of modernist women writers? Further, what lenses might the sciences or social sciences provide for understanding the role of gender in literary modernism? Finally, what are the implications of such interdisciplinary or intermedia work for pedagogy and scholarship? Papers might consider collaborative relationships between women literary modernists and producers in other media. Other possibilities include the influence of different art forms and the impact of scholarly disciplines even further afield (like the sciences) in the articulation of gender among literary modernists. This panel also welcomes papers that focus on how literary modernism and questions of gender contribute to contemporary interdisciplinary inquiries as well as ideas for how to best engage in and present this scholarship in the academy.

cfp categories: gender_studies_and_sexualitymodernist studiestwentieth_century_and_beyond 38109NEMLA Queer Counterpublics: deadline 9/30/2010Grace Sikorskigsikorski@aacc.edu1282772623americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturereligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Grace Sikorskicontact email: gsikorski@aacc.edu

Call for Papers for a penal on queer counterpublics . . .

42nd Annual Convention
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
April 7-10, 2011
New Brunswick, New Jersey

The 42nd Annual Convention will feature approximately 350 sessions, as well as dynamic speakers and cultural events. Interested participants may submit abstracts to more than one NeMLA session; however, panelists can only present one paper (panel or seminar). Convention participants may present a paper at a panel and also present at a creative session or participate in a roundtable.
Abstract Deadline: September 30, 2010

Please include with your abstract:

* Name and Affiliation
* Email address
* A/V requirements (if any; $10 handling fee)

Judith Jack Halberstam pursues a uniquely queer counterpublic:

"[Q]ueer" refers to nonnormative logics and organizations of community, sexual identity, embodiment, and activity in space and time. "Queer time" is a term for those specific models of temporality that emerge within postmodernism once one leaves the temporal frames of bourgeois reproduction and family, longevity, risk/safety, and inheritance. "Queer space" refers to the place-making practices within postmodernism in which queer people engage and it also describes the new understandings of space enabled by the production of queer counterpublics. (In a Queer Time and Place: Transgender Bodies 6).

This panel welcomes all papers on gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, drag, sadism, masochism, fetish, butch/femme, polyamory, cross-generational erotics, and other forms of nonnormativity as queer counterpublic discourse in literature, film, and culture. Attention should be given to the potential of queer counterpublics to subvert the hegemonic order of sex, sexuality, gender, desire, and bodies and to establish an alternative discursive, symbolic, imaginary, or literal location for queer behaviors, bodies, and identities. Interest will also go to papers that acknowledge the complex relationship between public and private domains, the role of consumer culture in the production of certain counterpublics, and the cooptation of queer counterpublics into the hegemonic of popular public consumption. Of interest as well is the production, reproduction, distribution, adaptation, or reception of queer counterpublics. There are no parameters for historical period or national context.

550 characters

This panel welcomes papers on queer counterpublics including LGBTQ, drag, bdsm, fetish, butch/femme, polyamory, etc., in literature, film, and culture; the subversion of the hegemonic order of sex, sexuality, gender, desire, and bodies; alternative discursive, symbolic, imaginary, or literal locations for queer behaviors, bodies, and identities; and the role of consumer culture in the production of queer counterpublics. Submit to gsikorski@aacc.edu

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturereligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositionromanticscience_and_culturetheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 38110CFP: [29th Oct. 2010] Fanpires: Audience Consumption of the Modern VampireDr Gareth Schott (Ed.) & Dr Kirstine Moffat (Ed.), University of Waikato, NZg.schott@waikato.ac.nz1282773820cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturereligionromanticfull name / name of organization: Dr Gareth Schott (Ed.) & Dr Kirstine Moffat (Ed.), University of Waikato, NZcontact email: g.schott@waikato.ac.nz

This edited collection will examine the cultural resurgence of the vampire. It aims to provide inter-disciplinary accounts of the reception and cultural impact of contemporary representations of the vampire evident across a broad range of mediums, including literature (e.g. Evernight, The Vampire Academy), film (e.g. Twilight saga), television (e.g. The Vampire Diaries, True Blood), graphic novels (e.g. Chibi Vampire) and games (e.g. Vampire Rain). The appeal of vampire mythology and its associated folklore for modern audiences will be examined in an age characterized by the transformative possibilities of the internet with both its low barriers to artistic expression and the erosion of the boundaries between author and audience.

From evil villains to tragic heroes, modern appropriations and re-workings of the vampire genre, evident in popular manifestations such as the Twilight saga and the television adaptation of The Southern Vampire Mysteries (True Blood) are noted for their focus on the everyday. The 'new wave' vampire is commonly nested within communities, seeking to temper their urges and coexist with humans. Such contemporary treatments of the vampire fulfill the performative role traditionally associated with media fandom that has seen the creation of texts that 'enact, share in, and see scenes that the canonical author never created' (Lancaster, 2001, p. 131).

Within the context of reception and fandom, we aim to attract contributions that address (but are not limited to):

• Fan Practices (art, fiction and films as well as discussions devoted to key vampire texts)
• Anti-fans, negative reactions and responses
• Impact and appeal of the vampire for different audiences (intended and unintended).
• The scholar as fan. Distinctions between experience, interpretation and thinking as a fan and a scholar.
• Author as fan (for example, homage/adaptation works such as Pride and Prejudice retellings Vampire Darcy's Desire by Regina Jeffers or Mr Darcy Vampyre by Amanda Grange)
• The journey of the fan. Where does fandom of a particular text lead audiences? A reference to the gothic appeal of Wuthering Heights in Twilight, led Publisher Harper Collins to reissue Bronte's novel with the tagline "Bella and Edward's favorite book," quadrupling its annual sales.
• The role of merchandising within vampire fan culture.
• Issues related to film, television, game adaptation/translation (e.g. Why are there very few original or franchise tie-in vampire videogames? What prohibits the translation of vampire narratives into interactive games?)
• The relationship between modern representations of the vampire (e.g. TV's Being Human or Blood Ties) and other contemporary media genres (e.g. reality tv, sitcom, murder mystery etc.)
• The construction and appeal of the 'dark romance' genre
• Analysis of the plight of the vampire and the burden of immortality. Inter-generational differences between vampires and humans and vampires from a different age. For example, True Blood's Bill Compton, turned during the American Civil War, and his young progeny Jessica Hamby (who keeps her 'own' blog on http://babyvamp-jessica.com). How forgotten social conventions, mannerisms and standards are reintroduced into society through the presence of vampires. How vampires from a previous age negotiate the demands of a contemporary world.
• The domestication of the vampire. The shift in contemporary texts from vampires as mythic creatures to quasi-human beings confronting everyday, human problems and relationships. For example: the vampire family (such as the Cullens in Twilight), the bond between creator and 'child' or the challenges of bodily sustenance (such as the 'vegetarian' Cullens in Twilight or the vampire blood banks in True Blood).
• World media and cross-cultural comparisons (e.g. Sergei Lukyanemko's Russian Vampire quartet currently adapted into two films Nightwatch and Daywatch).

KEY DATES:
Chapter Proposals (Abstract), 500-800 words + 6 keywords – October 29th, 2010
Notification of Acceptance – November 19th, 2010
Chapter Submission (5,000 words) – February 29th, 2011
Final Submission for Revised Chapters – 31st May, 2011

All submissions to g.schott@waikato.ac.nz or kirstine@waikato.ac.nz

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturereligionromantic 38111PCA/ACA Material Culture CFPMaterial Culture Area of PCA/ACA (Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association) alexbitterman@gmail.com1282777912general_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Material Culture Area of PCA/ACA (Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association) contact email: alexbitterman@gmail.com

Material Culture Area

The study of material culture offers an exciting area for interdisciplinary research and conversation, as it brings together those engaged in scholarly inquiry in areas as diverse as history, art history, design, decorative arts, cultural studies, consumer studies, literature, communications, anthropology, and sociology. If your work touches on the study of designed objects and consumer goods, we would love to learn more about it at this year's conference in San Antonio. Academics, practitioners, graduate students, museum professionals, and public historians are welcome.

Past presentations in this area have focused on decorative arts and the construction of literary characters, the material culture of poverty, commemorative items, historic and modern furnishings and fashion, branding and marketing trends, and a wide range of associated topics, if you think your work might fit in the material culture area, we encourage you to send an abstract.

Selected works may be published in an edited volume after presentation.

Submission Guidelines:
If you are interested in presenting, or have any questions, please send an abstract of between 150–350 words to:

Dr. Alex Bitterman
School of Design
Rochester Institute of Technology
3404 Booth Hall
73 Lomb Memorial Drive
Rochester, NY 14623-5603
alexbitterman@gmail.com

Deadline for submission: Midnight EST, December 15, 2009.

cfp categories: general_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialscience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 38113The South and Sexuality @ the Southern American Studies Association 2011 Atlanta, GA February 17-19, 2011 Lisa Hinrichsenlhinrich@uark.edu1282783828african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitymodernist studiestwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Lisa Hinrichsencontact email: lhinrich@uark.edu

The South and Sexuality

This panel will explore the myriad roles sexuality has played in the literature, culture and history of the U.S. South. Potential topics might include the intersections between class, race, gender and sexuality; the relationship between social justice and sexual identity; the social geography of gay, lesbian, bisexual, heterosexual, and transgendered spaces; the social institution of the family and the formation of sexuality; the ways in which the global economy, nationalism, and regionalism shape sexual identity; the erotics of friendship; the relationship between the public sphere and private life; reproduction and maternity; tactics of secrecy, indirection, and ambiguity; and the relationship between religion and sexuality. Given the multi-faceted nature of this topic, proposals of an interdisciplinary nature are particularly encouraged.

Please send a 150-200 word abstract plus a one-page C.V. by September 1, 2010 to Dr. Lisa Hinrichsen, Department of English, University of Arkansas, 333 Kimpel Hall, Fayetteville, AR 72701 or at lhinrich@uark.edu. Proposals and queries welcome before the deadline.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitymodernist studiestwentieth_century_and_beyond 38114Crèvecoeur: American Paradox NEMLA April 2011Tanya Radford, Dominican Collegetanya.radford@dc.edu1282783939americaneighteenth_centuryfull name / name of organization: Tanya Radford, Dominican Collegecontact email: tanya.radford@dc.edu

Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur's *Letters from an American Farmer* and *Sketches of 18th-Century America* remain relevant because of their exploration of American contradictions, and the manner in which they negotiate the paradoxes of American identity. This panel will examine the tensions at the heart of Crèvecoeur's writings, and explore whether some sort of balance (or "equipoise," to use farmer James's term) is possible in our contradictory America. Please send 300-500 word abstracts to Tanya.Radford@dc.edu by Sept 30, 2010. Please include your name, title, and affiliation.

cfp categories: americaneighteenth_century 38115Poor Manuscripts...Rich Manuscripts: Early Middle English Manuscript Production (Leeds, 11-14 July 2011)Early Middle English Societydokim@vassar.edu1282787669medievalfull name / name of organization: Early Middle English Societycontact email: dokim@vassar.edu

Many of the earliest Middle English texts from the twelfth and thirteenth centuries are found in relatively "shabby" manuscripts. We would like to take up the complex manuscript milieu that could often produce both "poor," or shabby, manuscripts, and "rich," or deluxe, manuscripts. We are broadly interested in papers that may consider regional differences; patronage; multilingual contents; diverse audiences; codicological concerns; etc. Methods of engagement with the topic might include, but are not limited to, comparing different "looking" early Middle English manuscripts that contain the same (i.e. redactions, variants, copies of) texts; investigating how early Middle English manuscripts use even older manuscripts circulating in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries; considering how early Middle English editors, scribes, writers, etc., engage, regard, nostalgize the archive of Anglo-Saxon manuscripts; exploring how early Middle English manuscripts are received in the early Modern period by collectors; considering whether or not the relationships between texts in early Middle English manuscripts change in later manuscripts, and how manuscript contexts change around early Middle English texts throughout the medieval period.

Please send proposals by September 25, 2010 to Dorothy Kim (dokim@vassar.edu).

cfp categories: medieval 381166th International IDEA Conference: Studies in English (12-15 April 2011)The English Laguage and Literature Research Association of Turkey/ Istanbul Kultur Universityaseval@iku.edu.tr / e.ozverak@iku.edu.tr1282812542african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissanceromantictheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: The English Laguage and Literature Research Association of Turkey/ Istanbul Kultur Universitycontact email: aseval@iku.edu.tr / e.ozverak@iku.edu.tr

Studies in English
6th International IDEA Conference
April 13 -15, 2011
Istanbul Kültür University

The Sixth International IDEA Conference will be held at
Istanbul Kültür University, Istanbul Turkey on 13 – 15 April 2011.
The Conference will be jointly hosted by The Department of English Language and Literature of Istanbul Kültür University and The English Language and Literature Research Association of Turkey (IDEA).

The Conference will address topics from the fields of English Studies, Literatures in English, Comparative Literature, Cultural Studies, Linguistics and Translation Studies in English.

Abstracts for proposed papers (maximum 250 words) should be submitted to: idea2011@iku.edu.tr

Please include your name, affiliation, email address and a brief biography. Add 5-6 keywords pertaining to your topic.

THE DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS IS 3 DECEMBER 2010.

For enquiries, please contact:
Aysem Seval aseval@iku.edu.tr or Eleni Ozverak Baruh e.ozverak@iku.edu.tr

www.iku.edu.tr/idea2011

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesmedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturepostcolonialrenaissanceromantictheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 38117Tarot at PCA/ACA Conference 2011PCA/ACA Conferenceaugeremily@gmail.com1282825992cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centurygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarymedievalpopular_culturereligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositiontwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: PCA/ACA Conferencecontact email: augeremily@gmail.com

I am looking for papers on all aspects of Tarot for the 2011 PCA/ACA conference in San Antonio (April 20-23). Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:

-Tarot and art history
-Tarot and literature
-Tarot artists, writers, and readers
-Individual decks and their guidebooks
-Tarot as a motif in comics, literature, and film
-Playing cards in art history

Participants should be prepared to present their work as scholarly research and / or for the benefit of an interested audience of academics.

Submissions should include the author's CV, short biography (100-150 words), and abstract (100-250 words). Deadline for submissions December 15, 2010.

For more information on the conference, see the conference website:http://pcaaca.org/conference/national.php.

For more information on Tarot related publications and special calls, see my website.

Emily E. Auger, PhD
Independent Scholar
Author of Tarot and Other Meditation Decks (McFarland 2004)
Website: http://emilyeauger.weebly.com/index.html
Email: augeremily@gmail.com

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centurygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarymedievalpopular_culturereligionrenaissancerhetoric_and_compositiontwentieth_century_and_beyond 38118UPDATE: Exploring the New Century "Other" Deadline Oct. 30, 2010LITERARY HORIZONS JOURNAL literaryhorizons@yahoo.com1282826739african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygraduate_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaystwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: LITERARY HORIZONS JOURNAL contact email: literaryhorizons@yahoo.com

The rise of Barak Obama to the United States presidency, as the first African American to occupy the position, has heralded a new dawn both for America and the world. This development also underlies a re-shaping of political, economic, and social structures in a century that has seen a shift in perceptions toward minorities and other marginalized segments of the human race. Given this background, the Literary Horizons Journal, a journal dedicated solely to publishing the work of graduate students, is soliciting papers that explore the new century "Other." Submissions may focus on such topics as contemporary views of sexuality, race, religion, nationhood, migration, etc.

Original manuscripts of 3000-3500 words in MLA format should be submitted
no later than October 30, 2010. Please include a brief biographical
statement. Papers must be submitted electronically (MS Word 1997-2003 document
only) to literaryhorizons@yahoo.com and hard copies sent by snailmail to:

Dr. Paul M. Mukundi, Editor in Chief
Literary Horizons Journal
Morgan State University
Department of English and Language Arts
Holmes Hall Room 202L
1700 E. Cold Spring Lane
Baltimore, MD 21251-0001

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygraduate_conferencesjournals_and_collections_of_essaystwentieth_century_and_beyond 381192011 NeMLA in New Brunswick, NJ, April 7-10, 2011 Session: Samuel Beckett's Bilingualism Nadia Louarlouarn@uwosh.edu1282826792interdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesrhetoric_and_compositiontheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Nadia Louarcontact email: louarn@uwosh.edu

2011 NeMLA in New Brunswick, NJ, April 7-10, 2011
Samuel Beckett's Bilingualism

This panel will address the specific question of bilingualism in the work of Samuel Beckett. How can we understand this unique literary language? Can Beckett's bilingualism be understood as a phenomenon that goes beyond linguistic boundaries? Please submit 300-500 word abstracts in French or English on any aspect of Beckett's bilingualism to Nadia Louar, Email: louarn@uwosh.edu.(Deadline 30th September, 2011)

cfp categories: interdisciplinaryinternational_conferencesrhetoric_and_compositiontheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 38120{UPDATE) The Relationship Between Music and Literary Works by Langston Hughes 4/6-9/11The Langston Hughes Society (College Language Association Convention)sharon.jones@wright.edu1282831970african-americanamericanethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementspoetrytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: The Langston Hughes Society (College Language Association Convention)contact email: sharon.jones@wright.edu

The Langston Hughes Society
Special Session: The Relationship Between Music and Literary Works by Langston Hughes
2011 College Language Association Convention
Host: the University of South Carolina Upstate in Spartanburg, South Carolina
Host Hotel: The Spartanburg Marriott Hotel at Renaissance Park in Spartanburg, SC
Conference Dates: April 6-9, 2011

The Langston Hughes Society welcomes papers that examine the relationship between music and literary works (poetry, drama, fiction, and/or nonfiction) by Langston Hughes. Papers which explore jazz, blues, gospel, hip hop, and other forms of musical expression relevant to literary works by Langston Hughes are encouraged. All individuals with accepted proposals must join the Langston Hughes Society and the College Language Association. Please email an abstract (300-400 words) and a biographical profile (3-5 lines) to Dr. Sharon Lynette Jones at sharon.jones@wright.edu by August 30, 2010.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanethnicity_and_national_identitygeneral_announcementspoetrytwentieth_century_and_beyond 38121[Update] Sidney at Kalamazoo, 12-15 May 2011; Deadline 15 Sept. 2011International Sidney Societyjbdavis@stetson.edu1282837185bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementspoetryreligionrenaissancefull name / name of organization: International Sidney Societycontact email: jbdavis@stetson.edu

The Sidney Society sponsors two open sessions on Philip Sidney and his Circle at the 46th International Congress on Medieval Studies Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo, Michigan). The conference website is here: http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/

12-15 May 2011

Abstracts are invited on any subject dealing with Philip Sidney and his circle. As always, we encourage proposals from newcomers as well as established scholars.

Papers should be limited to twenty minutes in reading time. Please do not submit an abstract to two different sessions of the conference in the same year.

Abstracts (250-500 words) should be submitted electronically and should indicate clearly your mailing address and phone number. If you need special equipment for the talk (digital projector, etc.), let us know when you submit your abstract, rather than later, please.

Deadline for abstracts: 15 September 2010.

Please send your abstracts (email preferably) to:
Joel Davis
jbdavis@stetson.edu

Joel B Davis
Associate Professor
Coordinator, MA Program in English
Stetson University
421 N Woodland Blvd Unit 8300
DeLand FL 32723
386.822.7724

cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookcultural_studies_and_historical_approachesecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesgender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementspoetryreligionrenaissance 38122Mental Health and Mental Illness in Popular CultureLawrence C. Rubin, Ph.D.; St. Thomas Universitylrubin@stu.edu1282844012americanfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypopular_cultureprofessional_topicsfull name / name of organization: Lawrence C. Rubin, Ph.D.; St. Thomas Universitycontact email: lrubin@stu.edu

Mental Health and Mental Illness
In Popular Culture

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: SESSIONS, PANELS, PAPERS
2011 Popular PCA/ACA Conference, April 20-23, San Antonio, Texas

Welcome to one of the newest and hopefully one of the most stimulating and provocative Areas of the Popular Culture Association. Throughout recorded history, those regarded as mentally ill have frightened, fascinated and challenged us to look deep within the human experience for answers to the most fundamental of questions about ourselves and each other. The study of Psychology which is rooted in Philosophy has offered many fascinating explanations for our behavior, both normal and deviant. However, it has only been within the recent past that Psychology and Popular Culture Studies have come together in attempts to answer some of these age-old questions.

Please consider submitting an electronic abstract of 150-250 words on a topic that intersects psychology, mental health/illness and popular culture. Deadline is 12/15/2010. Suggested topics include:

Depictions of mental health and mental illness in
• Movies, television or animation
• Literature, comics or graphic novels
• Music and musicals
• Advertising
• Sports
• Religion
• Media representations of psychotherapy, counseling or psychiatry
• Political Movements
• Education
The role of psychology and psychiatry in deepening our understanding of mental health and mental illness through
• Social Media (Facebook, You Tube, Twitter) or technology
• Fashion or architecture
• Social, religious or political movements
• Entertainment, sports or gaming
• Consumerism, food/eating practices or pornography
• Poverty, racism, discrimination or terrorism
Famous cultural and historical figures that have impacted the confluence of mental health and mental illness through
• Social movements and social reform
• Electronic media
• Scientific study
• Business
• Religion

Lawrence C. Rubin, Ph.D.
Professor of Counselor Education
St. Thomas University
Miami, FL 33054 USA
305-628-6585 lrubin@stu.edu

cfp categories: americanfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypopular_cultureprofessional_topics 38123African American Literature at CEA (11/1/2010, 3/31-4/2/2011)College English Association cea.english@gmail.com1282852677african-americanfull name / name of organization: College English Association contact email: cea.english@gmail.com

Call for Papers, CEA 2011 | FORTUNES
42nd Annual Conference | March 31 - April 2, 2011 | St. Petersburg, Florida
The Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront, 333 First Street South, St. Petersburg, Florida 33701; (727) 894-5000

Submission deadline: November 1, 2010 at http://cea-web.org/

The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations for our 42nd annual conference.

The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations on African American Literature for our 41st annual conference.

Special topics in African-American Literature is accepting abstracts for presentation on the main conference theme of Fortunes. African American Literature is abound with the search for fortune and the fight against misfortune. Within African American literature we find both individuals and groups searching for their fortune rather it be financially or spiritually. Do African Americans suffer misfortune more than fortune? Is wealth determined by money in the African-American community? Does economic decline disproportionately impact African Americans? For our 2011 meeting, CEA invites papers that explore all aspects of Fortune within the African American literary tradition.

The conference theme should be interpreted broadly as we will accept solid abstracts on any topic related to African-American Literature.

Submission: August 15 - November 1, 2010
Please see the submission instructions at http://cea-web.org/

Conference Theme: Fortunes
Money, luck, friendship, health, a warm place to sleep. In a world staggered by economic decline and natural catastrophes, what are the new boundaries of success and misfortune? How do art, literature, and the classroom respond to the Rota Fortunae? For our 2011 meeting, CEA invites papers and panels that explore Fortune as both a daunting challenge and an elusive ideal. For more information, please see the full CFP at http://cea-web.org/

General Call for Papers
CEA also welcomes proposals for presentations in any of the areas English departments typically encompass, including literature, creative writing, composition, technical communication, linguistics, and film. We also welcome papers on areas that influence our work as academics, including student demographics, student/instructor accountability and assessment, student advising, academic leadership in departments and programs, and the place of the English department in the university.

Membership
All presenters at the 2011 CEA conference must become members of CEA by January 1, 2011. To join CEA, please go to http://cea-web.org/

More information
* Get short, timely messages from CEA via Twitter: http://twitter.com/CEAtweet
* Connect with CEA on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CollegeEnglishAssociation
* Find out more about conference lodging and registration: http://cea-web.org/
* Contact CEA officers: http://cea-web.org/

Other questions? Please email cea.english@gmail.com.

Sincerely,
Shelia Collins
Special Panels Chair in African American Literature
cea.english@gmail.com

cfp categories: african-american 38124(mis)Representing Difference in Media and Everyday ItemsHumanities Education and Research Association lewestman@utep.edu1282853667african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromantictheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Humanities Education and Research Association contact email: lewestman@utep.edu

The journal "Interdisciplinary Humanities" invites papers for the Fall 2011 special issue: "(mis)Representing Difference in Media and Everyday Items," edited by Susan Booker Morris, Former Director of Jim Crow Museum, Ferris State University.
Although reason and discourse are important in framing and communicating 'truths' about the human being, increasingly visual representation is serving to communicate attitudes, histories, beliefs, and values. This special issue on the representation of the 'other' invites your analysis of race, ethnicity, nationality, queerness, or gender as found in representations in television, ads, films, photographs, video games, computer images, etc. As these othernesses are constructed, the visual representation is one arena in which the construction takes place and is disseminated. Any theoretical bases are welcome. Use of the Jim Crow Museum at www.ferris.edu/jimcrow is particularly encouraged but not required. Please send queries and submissions electronically to Dr. Morris at morrisus@ferris.edu. Submissions should not exceed 6000 words.
For more information about "Interdisciplinary Humanities," see our web site at: http://www.h-e-r-a.org/hera_journal.htm

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureecocriticism_and_environmental_studiesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievalmodernist studiespopular_culturepostcolonialreligionrenaissanceromantictheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 38125What a 'Man''s Gotta Do: (Re)Defining Duty in Post-Feminist Action Films (NeMLA, 4/7-10; 9/30)Northeast Modern Language Associationabelee@ncc.edu1282857636americanfilm_and_televisionfull name / name of organization: Northeast Modern Language Associationcontact email: abelee@ncc.edu

Call for Papers

What a 'Man''s Gotta Do: (Re)Defining Duty in Post-Feminist Action Films (seminar)

at

42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

April 7-10, 2011

New Brunswick, NY – Hyatt New Brunswick

Host Institution: Rutgers University

The action film presents the ultimate arena for testing both commitment to society and personal integrity. This seminar is interested in papers that examine the qualities prized in these heroes--male or female--that enter these arenas, and the implications on contemporary definitions of American masculinity and/or femininity. Papers are welcome that look at individual films, as well as works of a particular director or actor. Accepted papers are completed and reviewed by the participants in advance in preparation for an active conversation at the convention. Submit 250-500 word abstract in body of email to Elizabeth Abele abelee@ncc.edu

This session is part of NeMLA's Cultural Studies and Film Area: http://www.nemla.org/convention/2011/cfp.html#culturalstudiesandfilm

Deadline: September 30, 2010. Please include with your abstract and title, your name and affiliation, and email address.

The 42nd Annual Convention will feature approximately 370 sessions, as well as dynamic speakers and cultural events. Details and the complete Call for Papers for the 2011 Convention can be found at : www.nemla.org. Interested participants may submit abstracts to more than one NeMLA session; however panelists can only present one paper (panel or seminar). Convention participants may present a paper at a panel and also present at a creative session or participate in a roundtable.

cfp categories: americanfilm_and_television 38126(Kalamazoo, 2011) Early Middle English and the LawEarly Middle English Societydokim@vassar.edu1282864241medievalfull name / name of organization: Early Middle English Societycontact email: dokim@vassar.edu

We are interested in papers that will address any aspect of the law broadly defined in early Middle English texts. This could range from legal language, the influence of the Magna Carta, legal procedure and literary production, outlaws, disputatio, law as a separate language, canon law and religious texts, Lateran IV, royal law and court production, law and historiography, law and hagiography, legal documents, contracts, Jews and the law, law and visual iconography.

Proposals should be sent to Dorothy Kim (dokim@vassar.edu) by September 25th.

cfp categories: medieval 38127[UPDATE] The Bible and Early Modern Radicals: Milton, Bunyan, and Others (9/30)John Acker, Ohio State U English Departmentkjvconference@osu.edu1282865923religionrenaissancefull name / name of organization: John Acker, Ohio State U English Departmentcontact email: kjvconference@osu.edu

The English Department at The Ohio State University will host an international conference in 2011 on the 400th anniversary of the publication of the King James (or Authorized) Version of the Bible. Held in Columbus, Ohio from May 5-7, 2011, the conference will focus on the making of the KJV in the context of Reformation Bible translation and printing as well as on the KJV's long literary and cultural influence from Milton and Bunyan to Faulkner, Woolf, and Toni Morrison. Events will include plenary lectures and discussions, roundtable seminars, an exhibit by the OSU Rare Books and Manuscript Library, and a special reading and Q&A session with Pulitzer-Prize-winning author Edward P. Jones (Lost in the City; The Known World; All Aunt Hagar's Children). Submission deadlines have been extended, so don't miss the chance to participate in this exciting event! Please refer to http://kingjamesbible.osu.edu for further conference info, and contact kjvconference@osu.edu with any questions.

We are currently seeking participants for a roundtable seminar on "The Bible and Early Modern Radicals: Milton, Bunyan, and Others." Each participant will submit a short position paper in advance of the conference; the seminar leader (Dr. Angelica Duran, Purdue University) will then read all the papers, formulate discussion questions, and circulate the papers and questions to participants. Dr. Duran will determine more precise schedules and seminar requirements, once enrollments have been reviewed and approved.

Potential texts for this seminar include Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes, Pilgrim's Progress, or any of the other poetry and prose of Milton and Bunyan. Topics are open within the general area, but should encourage wide-ranging thematic discussion, which will comprise much of the actual conference.

Please submit questions or project titles & statements of interest to kjvconference@osu.edu by September 30, 2010. Thank you for your interest!

cfp categories: religionrenaissance 38128[UPDATE] African-American Literature and the Bible (9/30)John Acker, Ohio State U English Departmentkjvconference@osu.edu1282866093african-americanamericanreligionfull name / name of organization: John Acker, Ohio State U English Departmentcontact email: kjvconference@osu.edu

The English Department at The Ohio State University will host an international conference in 2011 on the 400th anniversary of the publication of the King James (or Authorized) Version of the Bible. Held in Columbus, Ohio from May 5-7, 2011, the conference will focus on the making of the KJV in the context of Reformation Bible translation and printing as well as on the KJV's long literary and cultural influence from Milton and Bunyan to Faulkner, Woolf, and Toni Morrison. Events will include plenary lectures and discussions, roundtable seminars, an exhibit by the OSU Rare Books and Manuscript Library, and a special reading and Q&A session with Pulitzer-Prize-winning author Edward P. Jones (Lost in the City; The Known World; All Aunt Hagar's Children). Submission deadlines have been extended, so don't miss the chance to participate in this exciting event! Please refer to http://kingjamesbible.osu.edu for further conference info, and contact kjvconference@osu.edu with any questions.

We are currently seeking participants for a roundtable seminar on African-American Literature and the Bible. Each participant will submit a short position paper in advance of the conference; the seminar leader (Dr. Jocelyn Moody, University of Texas, San Antonio) will then read all the papers, formulate discussion questions, and circulate the papers and questions to participants. Dr. Moody will determine more precise schedules and seminar requirements, once enrollments have been reviewed and approved.

Potential authors for this seminar include (but are not limited to) Toni Morrison, Richard Wright, Frederick Douglass, Ishmael Reed, James Baldwin, and Ralph Ellison. Topics are open within the general area, but should encourage wide-ranging thematic discussion, which will comprise much of the actual conference.

Please submit questions or project titles & statements of interest to kjvconference@osu.edu by September 30, 2010. Thank you for your interest!

cfp categories: african-americanamericanreligion 38129[UPDATE] Translating the Bible in the Long Reformation (9/30)John Acker, Ohio State U English Departmentkjvconference@osu.edu1282866319eighteenth_centuryreligionrenaissancefull name / name of organization: John Acker, Ohio State U English Departmentcontact email: kjvconference@osu.edu

The English Department at The Ohio State University will host an international conference in 2011 on the 400th anniversary of the publication of the King James (or Authorized) Version of the Bible. Held in Columbus, Ohio from May 5-7, 2011, the conference will focus on the making of the KJV in the context of Reformation Bible translation and printing as well as on the KJV's long literary and cultural influence from Milton and Bunyan to Faulkner, Woolf, and Toni Morrison. Events will include plenary lectures and discussions, roundtable seminars, an exhibit by the OSU Rare Books and Manuscript Library, and a special reading and Q&A session with Pulitzer-Prize-winning author Edward P. Jones (Lost in the City; The Known World; All Aunt Hagar's Children). Submission deadlines have been extended, so don't miss the chance to participate in this exciting event! Please refer to http://kingjamesbible.osu.edu for further conference info, and contact kjvconference@osu.edu with any questions.

We are currently seeking participants for a roundtable seminar entitled "Translating the Bible in the Long Reformation." Each participant will submit a short position paper in advance of the conference; the seminar leader (Dr. Vivienne Westbrook, National Taiwan University) will then read all the papers, formulate discussion questions, and circulate the papers and questions to participants. Dr. Westbrook will determine more precise schedules and seminar requirements, once enrollments have been reviewed and approved.

Potential topics for this seminar include individual translators or translations, personal or public, cultural and theological responses to a particular translation, issues involved in Bible translation, and Bible publication/distribution from the early sixteenth century into the seventeenth (from Tyndale to King James). Specific texts are open within the general area, but should encourage wide-ranging thematic discussion, which will comprise much of the actual conference.

Please submit questions or project titles & statements of interest to kjvconference@osu.edu by September 30, 2010. Thank you for your interest!

cfp categories: eighteenth_centuryreligionrenaissance 38130[UPDATE] KJV Remix: The Bible and 19th-Century British Literature (9/30)John Acker, Ohio State U English Departmentkjvconference@osu.edu1282866467religionromanticvictorianfull name / name of organization: John Acker, Ohio State U English Departmentcontact email: kjvconference@osu.edu

The English Department at The Ohio State University will host an international conference in 2011 on the 400th anniversary of the publication of the King James (or Authorized) Version of the Bible. Held in Columbus, Ohio from May 5-7, 2011, the conference will focus on the making of the KJV in the context of Reformation Bible translation and printing as well as on the KJV's long literary and cultural influence from Milton and Bunyan to Faulkner, Woolf, and Toni Morrison. Events will include plenary lectures and discussions, roundtable seminars, an exhibit by the OSU Rare Books and Manuscript Library, and a special reading and Q&A session with Pulitzer-Prize-winning author Edward P. Jones (Lost in the City; The Known World; All Aunt Hagar's Children). Submission deadlines have been extended, so don't miss the chance to participate in this exciting event! Please refer to http://kingjamesbible.osu.edu for further conference info, and contact kjvconference@osu.edu with any questions.

We are currently seeking participants for a roundtable seminar entitled "KJV Remix: The Bible and 19th Century British Literature." Each participant will submit a 1-2 page position paper in advance of the conference; seminar leaders (Dr. Les Tannenbaum and Dr. Clare Simmons, Ohio State University) will then read all the papers, formulate discussion questions, and circulate the papers and questions to participants. Drs. Simmons and Tannenbaum will determine more precise schedules and seminar requirements, once enrollments have been reviewed and approved.

The broad focus of this seminar will be on the simultaneous decline in this period in the King James Bible's status as Scripture and the establishment of its authority as a literary work. To what extent and in what ways does the KJV become more admired for its style than its accuracy or even theology? Papers will focus on distributed excerpts from authors including William Blake and John Ruskin.

Please submit questions or project titles & statements of interest to kjvconference@osu.edu by September 30, 2010. Thank you for your interest!

cfp categories: religionromanticvictorian 38131[UPDATE] Rendering the VisibleMoving Image Studies Program, Department of Communication, Georgia State Universitymovingimagestudies@gmail.com1282873085cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisionhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarytheoryfull name / name of organization: Moving Image Studies Program, Department of Communication, Georgia State Universitycontact email: movingimagestudies@gmail.com

RENDERING THE VISIBLE
Conference
February 11-12, 2011

The doctoral program in Moving Image Studies at Georgia State University welcomes paper proposals for a meta-disciplinary conference on the state of "the digital turn."

Keynote speakers: Vivian Sobchack and Akira Lippit

One of the most pressing questions facing studies of the image today is how to theorize visuality as more and more of the image archive is given over to the digital. This conference proposes that the notion of "rendering" might provide a useful entrée for an exploration of theoretical continuities and discontinuities in our understanding of the technologically-reproduced image, from Benjamin's "Short History of Photography" to CGI.

With regard to image and sound, "rendering" has both a technical and a theoretical currency. It is a term that emphasizes layering, enveloping and reversibility. In the processing of the image, rendering has the technical sense of the application to a sketch of various effects of "luminence" (transparency, translucency, etc.) under the assumption that light doesn't simply "strike" the object, but rather "envelops" it. Michel Chion relates "rendering" to sound theory with his notion of "rendu," which describes that the spectator being "seized" by an immersive sonic environment.

If "rendering" presents us with a "point of no return" (in which layers must be permanently merged), it simultaneously implies the slippery act of bringing into being. That is, when understood as a process, "rendering" shifts our attention to reversibility, oscillation, and becoming of the visual, which occur prior to the moment in which image layers are fixed. In this way, "rendering" emphasizes not the image but the image-state, which takes the digital as its "raw material" and embodies it, analogizes it, and thickens it in new and uniquely post-cinematic (and theoretically post-classical) ways. The inbetweenness of "rendering" may offer ways to understand new affects of visual images (across the photochemical and the digital) and their hybrid ontologies.

The conference organizers offer "rendering" as only one provocative tool but welcome paper proposals using any number of frameworks to consider how the digital turn might reconfigure fundamental ("classical") concepts such as inscription, photogénie, the punctum, the gaze, the body, materiality, aura, analogy, contingency, the virtual, the archive, the uncanny, the labor of imaging, indexicality, visuality, visibility, and decay as well as how "rendering" or, indeed other innovative theoretical tools might enable us to think through more recent concepts such as reversibility, the fold, becoming, topological figures, post-humanism, the interface, and the glitch.

Send paper proposal (300-500 words) & brief biography by 15 September 2010 to movingimagestudies@gmail.com

Queries can be directed to conference organizers Angelo Restivo, Alessandra Raengo, or Jennifer Barker. E-mail addresses at http://communication.gsu.edu/movingimagestudies/

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisionhumanities_computing_and_the_internetinterdisciplinarytheory 38132[UPDATE] Language and Linguistics Student Conference (November 13, 2010)Univeristy of Central Oklahomalangconf@gmail.com1282886787african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturereligionrhetoric_and_compositiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Univeristy of Central Oklahomacontact email: langconf@gmail.com

LANGUAGE & LINGUISTICS STUDENT CONFERENCE
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2010
UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL OKLAHOMA
EDMOND, OKLAHOMA
________________________________________

Conference Date: Saturday, November 13, 2010
Submission Deadline: Monday, September 27, 2010
Acceptance Notification: On or before Monday, October 11, 2010
Registration Deadline: Monday, October 25, 2010

ABSTRACTS are invited from undergraduate and graduate students for 15-minute presentations including, but not limited to, relationships between and among language, linguistics, and their many applications:

• natural and artificial languages
• indigenous languages
• extinct and endangered languages
• American Sign Language
• speech pathology and hearing sciences
• language and cognition
• theoretical and applied linguistics
• structural, semantic, or phonological analyses
• comparative grammars
• discourse/text analyses
• applications in pedagogy
• applications in rhetoric, the arts, literature, and the humanities
• applications in academic, cultural, and sociological constructs

STUDENTS whose abstracts are accepted will receive with their paid registration a ticket to the conference luncheon, an event t-shirt and tote bag, and access to all conference events, including the keynote address.

PRESENTATIONS may be readings or visual presentations, such as PowerPoint or handouts. Please note, all PowerPoint presentations must be PC compatible. No poster presentations will be accepted. Authors must currently be undergraduate or graduate students who are enrolled in at least three credit hours at an accredited college or university or must have graduated with a degree no earlier than December 2009.

SUBMISSIONS should consist of a titled abstract of no more than 150 words in MS Word format. Please include at the top of the abstract the title of your presentation but no personal identifying information (such as name or institution); however, please include identifying information in the body of the email message. Submissions should be sent as an attachment to langconf@gmail.com by the deadline of Monday, September 27, 2010. Late submissions are not guaranteed consideration for presentation. Questions regarding abstracts or presentations may be directed to the above address. For more information regarding conference events, please visit our conference website at http://www.libarts.uco.edu/english/linguistics.htm.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanchildrens_literatureclassical_studiescultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymedievalmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturereligionrhetoric_and_compositiontheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 38133Revolutionary Leaves: The Fiction of Mark Z. Danielewski (May 20-21, 2011; Munich, Germany)Sascha Pöhlmann, LMU Munich, Germanypoehlmann@lmu.de1282904232americantwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Sascha Pöhlmann, LMU Munich, Germanycontact email: poehlmann@lmu.de

This two-day event marks the fifth anniversary of the publication of Only Revolutions, Mark Z. Danielewski's second novel. Danielewski was already hailed as one the most innovative and exciting writers of experimental fiction after his debut House of Leaves was published in 2000, and Only Revolutions - as well as his 2005 novella The Fifty Year Sword - impressively confirmed this assessment. Danielewski is a favourite of literary critics as well as of very devoted fans around the globe, but so far no academic conference has yet been devoted exclusively to his works. Revolutionary Leaves aims to provide precisely such a forum for discussion without setting the papers any topical limits so as to do justice to the wide-ranging scope of Danielewski's texts and the complexity of their contexts. Besides the academic section, the conference will also include a discussion and workshop with Gerhard Falkner, the German translator of Only Revolutions.

We invite scholars of all fields to submit proposals of no more than 300 words by November 1, 2010. A preliminary program will be available by the end of November 2010.

Each speaker will have 25 minutes for his or her paper, plus 10 minutes of discussion; we aim to collect the essays for publication soon after the conference.

The conference is open to the public. There is no conference fee.

cfp categories: americantwentieth_century_and_beyond 38134SPECIAL ISSUE OF LITERATURE COMPASS ON THE GLOBAL MIDDLE AGESLiterature Compassheng@mail.utexas.edu, lynn.ramey@vanderbilt.edu1282914577cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievaltravel_writingfull name / name of organization: Literature Compasscontact email: heng@mail.utexas.edu, lynn.ramey@vanderbilt.edu

Literature Compass invites contributions for a special issue of the Global Circulation Project, edited by Geraldine Heng and Lynn Ramey, on the Global Middle Ages.

We define our period broadly as premodernity c. 500-1500 CE, always with flexible time horizons, and always with the understanding that the semi-convenient term "Middle Ages" is a heuristic category under erasure, and with diminished purchase for cultures and worlds outside premodern Europe.

Essays can focus on the circulation of a text, set of texts, ideas, themes, narratives, genres, or stories, and can take the form of broad surveys, or close readings of a particular motif, set of texts, or network of intercultural circulation. An interdisciplinary focus is especially welcome: in addition to literature and textuality, we are also interested in stories or themes that travel through fabrics, maps, sculpture, ceramics, clothing, edifices, or other cultural media, especially if they intersect with literary work. In like vein, we are equally interested in literary and cultural traces of how people and oral traditions traveled.

Contributions on cultural texts from other continents than the Americas and Europe are especially welcome. If you have an interest in an experimental approach or focus, please consult the issue editors at: heng@mail.utexas.edu and lynn.ramey@vanderbilt.edu

For more details on submission and the manuscript review process, please see: http://www.wiley.com/bw/submit.asp?ref=1741-4113
More information on LICO's Global Circulation Project can be found here: http://www.blackwell-compass.com/subject/literature/
and here: http://www.blackwell-compass.com/globalcirculationproject
More information on Literature Compass can be found here: http://www.blackwell-compass.com/subject/literature/about

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmedievaltravel_writing 38135Reading the Postcolonial Other in Contemporary Film, 2011 NeMLA@Rutgers, April 7-10, New Brunswick, NJNortheast Modern Language Association (NeMLA), Hosted by Rutgers U.blavin@optonline.net, walterstracey@hotmail.com1282916438african-americanethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitypostcolonialfull name / name of organization: Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA), Hosted by Rutgers U.contact email: blavin@optonline.net, walterstracey@hotmail.com

Over the last two decades, cinematic privileging of the postcolonial other has evolved a new, significant wedge against the plethora of hegemonic films. From Avatar to Slumdog Millionaire to The Secret of Roan Inish, the popular role of the postcolonial other in film has yielded a new transnational awareness as well as place in contemporary cinema. Additionally, these film depictions have alternately problematized and/or privileged themes of gender, migration, displacement and adaptation. This roundtable will examine through theoretical lenses how and why the postcolonial other has been positioned in privileged and colonized cultures by today's film industry. We will explore the cultural, historical and financial impact of colonial legacies as they appear in selected films as well as probe the tendencies to romanticize, corrupt or redeem the "other."

Roundtable participants should examine one specific film (Hollywood, independent or international) and its methods used (thematic, cinematic, narrative) in treating the theme of postcolonial other. 500 word abstract/CV by 9/30 to Co-chairs Sophie Lavin, SUNY Stony Brook: blavin@optonline.net AND Tracey Walters, SUNY Stony Brook: walterstracey@hotmail.com.

cfp categories: african-americanethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitypostcolonial 38136A conference on the work of John McGahernRichard Robinson / Swansea Universityr.p.robinson@swansea.ac.uk1282916759ethnicity_and_national_identityinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Richard Robinson / Swansea Universitycontact email: r.p.robinson@swansea.ac.uk

CALL-FOR-PAPERS
A conference on the work of
John McGahern
Swansea University
8-9 April 2011

Papers are invited for a two-day conference on the writings of John McGahern, to be held on 8-9 April 2011 at the Dylan Thomas Centre, Swansea. Submissions are welcome on all aspects of McGahern's fiction, and how it relates both to canonical and contemporary Irish literature.
It is misleading to dwell too much on the notorious banning of The Dark by the Irish censor in 1965. By the time of McGahern's death in 2006, his literary reputation in Ireland was secure – there is now an international summer school devoted to his work. McGahern has also won critical acclaim in France, but his position in Britain is more elusive. Although some British writers and critics have written admiringly of McGahern's work, his fiction has been somewhat overlooked or misrepresented: there has been a certain asymmetry to his critical reception on either side of the Irish Sea. This conference, the first of its kind to be held in Britain, will begin to redress this imbalance, enquiring into McGahern's role both as an Irish writer and a writer in English.
Speakers may wish to consider the following subjects:
• McGahern's engagement with, or disengagement from, Irish modernism.
• That 'dubious enterprise, the Irish Short Story' (JM): McGahern's contribution to the genre, Irish or not.
• Representations of the family, women, church, country, city, nation.
• The sacred and the profane; ritual.
• 'The universal is the local, but with the walls taken away' (JM, paraphrasing Miguel Torga).
• The Law of the Father; the lost Mother.
• Art and politics: the ideology of McGahern's aesthetic.
• How McGahern's fiction relates to wider debates about tradition and modernity in Irish studies.
• McGahern's critical reception in Ireland, Britain and elsewhere.
• McGahern's library: Tomás Ó Criomhthain, Ernie O' Malley, Alistair Macleod, John Williams, Forrest Reid, and others.
• Comparisons to and influences on contemporary Irish writers.
• Memories voluntary and involuntary: approaches to Memoir.

cfp categories: ethnicity_and_national_identityinternational_conferencesmodernist studiespostcolonialtwentieth_century_and_beyond 38137Melting-Pots and Mosaics: Paris and Montréal in Francophone Literature Pascale De Souza, GMUpdesouza@gmu.edu1282918166ethnicity_and_national_identitypostcolonialfull name / name of organization: Pascale De Souza, GMUcontact email: pdesouza@gmu.edu

This panel will examine the role played by Paris and Montreal in the evolution of francophone identities. While some writers have depicted the alienation experienced by their protagonists, others have explored the emergence of interlope cities. How do these divergent approaches shape the evolving image of the two cities in francophone literatures? How do protagonists negociate the emergence of multiple migrant voices? Are Paris and Montreal changing from failed melting pots to diffracted mosaics? Pascale de Souza, GMU, pdesouza@gmu.edu
Submitted for the NEMLA conference, Rutgers, New Brunswick, NJ, April 7-10th 2011

cfp categories: ethnicity_and_national_identitypostcolonial 38138Modernism, Modernity, and Politics: Face-off or Interface? NeMLA (April 7-10, 2011), Rutgers University (deadline Sept. 27)Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA), hosted by Rutgers U, New Brunswick, NJsmukherj@fas.harvard.edu1282922618african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespostcolonialtheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA), hosted by Rutgers U, New Brunswick, NJcontact email: smukherj@fas.harvard.edu

Although much has been written about the later personal politicization of a modernist such as Ezra Pound, critics have inadequately addressed the relationship between Anglo-American literary modernism and politics through an over-emphasis on the apolitical formal innovations of the movement: for instance, imagism in poetry or the stream-of-consciousness in fiction. Equally de-emphasized in critical discourse is the relationship between western literary modernism and non-western literary modernities, a relationship that invites exploration particularly due to the claims of cosmopolitanism made by the former. Although born in a Euro-centric context, western modernism had a far-reaching impact on contemporaneous Asian writers, for example. Yet, due to their colonial contexts, many such writers also lay claim to modernity through their deeply politicized—rather than apolitical/dehistoricized—literary visions. This panel will engage the relationship between literary modernism, literary modernity, and politics from a transnational perspective, with a focus on fiction. Does Anglo-American modernist fiction manifest a face-off with politics (and with a politicized conception of art) or an interface that has been elided by most critics of modernism? Is there a hiatus between British and American modernist fiction in this regard? How do non-western modern writers simultaneously negotiate western literary modernism and politicized fictional discourses that mark their modernity?

The panel, in its entirety, aims at initiating a transnational dialogue on modernity and modernism in fiction from a politicized framework; however, individual papers need not be on transnational topics. Ideally, the panel will include four papers, one each engaging some political dimension(s) in British modernism, US modernism, Asian modernity-modernism, and African or Latin American modernity-modernism, respectively. Papers may be on single or multiple texts/authors and politics may be interpreted broadly to include, for instance, gender politics.

Please send 250 word abstracts (including your affiliation) by 9/27 to Sri Mukherjee (smukherj@fas.harvard.edu) with "NeMLA Abstract" in the subject line.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespostcolonialtheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 38139The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations for ouCollege English Associationwlevy129@gmail.com1282924611cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturefull name / name of organization: College English Associationcontact email: wlevy129@gmail.com

Food and the Arts

The panel of Food and the Arts welcomes submissions of descriptions of food and meals that are illustrative of misfortune, economic decline, and natural or unnatural catastrophes. Discussion may be based on literature, painting, and film.

Submission: August 15 - November 1, 2010
Please see the submission instructions at http://cea-web.org/

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinarypopular_culture 38140Cliché in the work of Samuel Beckett: stimulus or obstacle? Limit(e)Beckett Issue 2 Limit(e)Beckettlimitebeckett@gmail.com1282929725cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiestheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Limit(e)Beckettcontact email: limitebeckett@gmail.com

Call for Papers for the second issue of Limit(e) Beckett :

Cliché in the work of Samuel Beckett: stimulus or obstacle?

Je connais ces petites phrases qui n'ont l'air de rien
et qui, une fois admises, peuvent vous empester toute une langue.
Malone meurt

Bouche comme cousue fil blanc invisible
Bing

Cliché itself, the degenerative metaphor of everyday language, is, Beckett recognizes, expressive of fundamental desires, fears and truths
Elizabeth Barry, Beckett and Authority: The Use of Cliche

Cliché points initially to the imprint of a mold, the impression, and the mechanical reproduction of the identical. Sounds marks, photographic prints, ready-made snatches of discourse or of representation: the varied forms of cliché in Beckett's work evoke an entire formal and signifying network, like these stereotyped expressions, replayed or thwarted by a narrative voice of uncertain responsibility, or like the definition of bodies by their rigid posture, with the pieces for television and their static shots.

Between text and image, the Beckettian cliché is characterised by the repetition of motifs, large recurring themes or brief quotations, musical phrases, pictorial visions or photographic negatives, ritualised gestures or autobiographical reminiscence. Discursive and non-discursive, the cliché or stereotype becomes a many-sided issue in writing, at once rhetorical, enunciative, aesthetic and logical. It reopens an ethical interrogation that allows us to problematise the passivity of its reception (the Flaubertian idée reçue), and the value of its sporadic appearance. The writing of cliché is at once the experience of an obstacle specific to language and representation, and of an event that alters the vitality of an "original" poetic creation; and the experimentation of a paradoxical stimulus, giving rise to a complex practice that also brings into question the memory and the cultural and historical context of Beckett's work.

By the very fact of this creative ambiguity aroused by cliché, the possible approaches to this topic are necessarily diverse: unreconcilable, but rich in unexpected resonances and varied perspectives. Such perspectives include, but are not limited to:
- historical, including those that question Beckett's relationship with the tradition of the modern writing of cliché, and his development as a writer during the era of 20th-century mass culture
- linguistic (énonciation and bilingualism)
- critical (interrogation of genres and of academicism)
- intertextual (the status of poetic, Biblical and philosophical quotations present throughout Beckett's œuvre)
- aesthetic (between voices, postures, images, technologies, exhaustion, and the variation of media)
- anthropological or political (norms and identities)
- philosophical (from the binary distinction between copy and original, to the modulation of a writing of variation)

It is this question of the paradoxical energy of the cliché within Beckett's polymorphous writing that will be the focus of Issue 2 of Limit(e) Beckett: what is to be done with it, against it, in its folds, interruptions, bypasses, diversions, even in its reactivations, between blockage and relaunch? Can it therefore be said that cliché constitutes the primary material of this writing? If cliché is defined initially by its impression, is there a force of impression in the Beckettian writing of the cliché? The breadth of the field of exploration opened by the cliché makes it less a theme than a sort of arrest (of the image, of discourse), which causes paths of reading to diverge, and prevents the unification of its interpretation. A plasticity of the cliché therefore: between sense and sensation, that Beckett approaches with humour, grace or violence, in the game of writing as in a risk constantly renewed. Seemingly so ordinary, the cliché appears where writing falters, and remains sometimes the ultimate mode of continuing – on the edge of the abyss.

www.limitebeckett.paris-sorbonne.fr

Limit/e Beckett is an international electronic journal, published by a team of Beckett doctoral candidates in partnership with two universities: Paris IV-Sorbonne and Paris VII-Denis Diderot.

Languages: French and English.
Format: Full articles (between 15000 and 35000 characters, spaces included).
Deadline for submissions: 30 January 2011.

We will contact the authors of the selected articles at the end of February 2011.
Online publication: Spring 2011, on the site Limit(e) Beckett : www.limitebeckett.paris-sorbonne.fr .

Contact: limitebeckett@gmail.com

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essaysmodernist studiestheatretwentieth_century_and_beyond 38141Beyond the Body: Migrating Past Physical Borders in Feminist Literature - Call for Papers for a Proposed Edited CollectionDr. Kinitra D. Brooks - University of Texas at San Antonio and Dr. Glenda Tibe Bonifacio - University of Lethbridge, Canadafeministmigrations@gmail.com1282931772african-americanamericanethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialreligiontheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Dr. Kinitra D. Brooks - University of Texas at San Antonio and Dr. Glenda Tibe Bonifacio - University of Lethbridge, Canadacontact email: feministmigrations@gmail.com

The body remains a preeminent place of reading in feminist theory, past and present. But, we wish to complete a feminist examination of those areas of research that speak of movements beyond the physical body. This project seeks papers that examine feminist literary characters that negotiate multiple borders and identities. What borders exist to be transgressed? What are the consequences (mental, physical, social) of transgressing these borders? What is specifically feminist in the act of crossing a border, any border that exists?

We are looking to put together 10-12 essays (which we will edit, introduce, and conclude) with the following sub-categories:

1. Spiritual Borders
This section might study the crossing of mental and religious borders between individuals and groups/or institutions. Topics such as possession, individual versus community agency and familial ties would be addressed.
2. Social Borders
This section might consider the traversing of socially constructed lines that influence status, comportment, and social determinations. We are specifically interested in those projects that analyze literary works in which there are transgressions of identities of gender and sexuality.
3. Cultural Borders
This section will examine the literary consequences of crossing seemingly distinct ethnic and/or racial borders.

The collection welcomes projects that explore works in all languages; however, we do request that the author translate all excerpts in foreign languages into English. Submitted works must be original and never been published in any form, or are under consideration by other publishers.

Please submit an abstract of 350 words, along with a 50-word author biography by December 1, 2010 to feministmigrations@gmail.com. Successful contributors will be notified by February 2011.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturepostcolonialreligiontheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 38142American Poetry & Poetics (Critical)Soutwest/Texas PCA & ACAmrh@unm.edu1282946175african-americanamericanmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Soutwest/Texas PCA & ACAcontact email: mrh@unm.edu

CFP: Poetry and Poetics (Critical)
Abstract/Proposals by 15 December 2010

32nd Annual Southwest/Texas American and Popular Culture Association
Conference.

Joint Conference with the National PCA/ACA
San Antonio, Texas
20-23 April 2011

Marriott Rivercenter San Antonio
101 Bowie Street
San Antonio, TX 78205
USA
Phone: (210) 223-1000

We are now forming panels for presentations of American poetry and poetics criticism at our 2011 conference. There are no limits in regard to historical period, topic, or theme, and we welcome panel proposals, especially those that include panelists from multiple institutions. Acceptances will ultimately depend on the availability of compatible presentations to form coherent panels.

If your research does not focus on poetry and poetics criticism but fits within the broad range of areas designated for the upcoming conference on American and Popular culture, we still encourage you to participate. Consult the conference website for a list of Area Chairs and their calls for papers.

Poet-critics who may wish to participate in the readings panels should contact either Jerry Bradley or Hugh Tribbey, via the conference website, in early fall.

Please forward this call to your colleagues and advanced graduate students.

We will review proposals on a rolling basis until the 15 December deadline. Submit a 350-500 word abstract, curriculum vitae, and contact information to

M. R. Hofer, Poetry and Poetics (Critical) Area Chair
English Department—MSC 03 2170
University of New Mexico
ABQ, NM 87131-0001
mrh@unm.edu

Email submissions are strongly preferred and will be acknowledged promptly.

The registration deadline for all conference participants is 7 January 2011.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanmodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 38143PCA Romance Area, San Antonio, TX 20-23 April, 2011. Deadline: Dec 15, 2010Popular Culture Association: Romance Areasarahfrantz@gmail.com1282958416americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarypopular_cultureromantictheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Popular Culture Association: Romance Areacontact email: sarahfrantz@gmail.com

CFP: PCA 2011--San Antonio, TX. April 20-23, 2011

We're soliciting proposals for the Romance Area for the Popular Culture Association conference. This year it's in San Antonio, TX. As always, it's the Wednesday-Saturday of Easter/Passover weekend, April 20-23, 2011.

PCA is an amazing conference to go to to experience the community of Popular Romance Studies. It's a VERY inviting conference for new scholars, and for interested non-scholars. We've had undergraduates and brand new graduate students very successfully present papers at PCA. We're welcoming, friendly, fun, a little bawdy, and very very interesting.

(Conference info: http://pcaaca.org/conference/national.php)

Deadline for submission: December 15, 2010.

We are interested in any and all topics about or related to popular romance: all genres, all media, all countries, all kinds, and all eras. All representations of romance in popular culture (fiction, stage, screen—large or small, commercial, advertising, music, song, dance, online, real life, etc.), from anywhere and anywhen, are welcome topics of discussion.

We will consider proposals for individual papers, sessions organized around a theme, and special panels. Sessions are scheduled in one-hour slots, ideally with four papers or speakers per standard session.

If you are involved in the creative industry of popular romance (romance author/editor, film director/producer, singer/songwriter, etc.) and are interested in speaking on your own work or on developments in the representations of popular romance, please contact us!

Some possible topics (although we are by no means limited to these):
*Popular Romance on the World Stage (texts in translation, Western and non-Western media, local and comparative approaches)
*Romance Across the Media: crossover texts and the relationships between romance fiction and romantic films, music, art, drama, etc.; also the paratexts and contexts of popular romance
*Romance High and Low: texts that fall between "high" and "low" culture, or that complicate the distinctions between these critical categories
*Romance Then and Now: representations of Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Romantic, Modern, Postmodern love
*Romancing the Marketplace: romantic love in advertising, marketing, and consumer culture
*Queering the Romance: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender romance, and representations of same-sex love within predominantly heterosexual texts
*BDSM Romance and representations of romantic/erotic power exchange
*Romance communities
*New Critical Approaches, such as readings informed by critical race theory, queer theory, postcolonial studies, or empirical science (e.g., the neurobiology of love)
*The Politics of Romance, and romantic love in political discourse (revolutionary, reactionary, colonial / anti-colonial, etc.)
*Individual Creative Producers or Texts of Popular Romance (novels, authors, film, directors, writers, songwriters, actors, composers, dancers, etc.)
*Gender-Bending and Gender-Crossing / Genre-Bending and Genre-Crossing / Media-Bending and Media-Crossing Popular Romance
*African-American, Latina, Asian, and other Multicultural romance
*Young Adult Romance
*History of/in Popular Romance
*Romance and Region: places, histories, mythologies, traditions
*Definitions and Theoretical Models of Popular Romance: it's not all just happily ever after

As we have done for the past three years, the Romance area will meet in a special Open Forum to discuss upcoming conferences, work in progress, and the future of the field of Popular Romance Studies. Of particular interest this year: the 2011 New York City conference for the International Association for the Study of Popular Romance http://iaspr.org, planning for the 2012 IASPR conference, and the first volume of the Journal of Popular Romance Studies http://jprstudies.org.

Submit a one-page (200-300 words) proposal or abstract (via regular mail or e-mail) by December 15, 2010, to the Area Chairs in Romance:

Sarah S. G. Frantz
Department of English and Foreign Languages
Fayetteville State University
1200 Murchison Road
Fayetteville, NC 28301
(910) 672-1438
sarahfrantz AT gmail DOT com

Darcy Martin
Adjunct Faculty, Women's Studies
East Tennessee State University
12 Wataugua Court
Bluffton, SC 29909
(843)705-4861
martindj AT etsu DOT edu

If you have any questions as all, please contact one or both of the area chairs. Please feel free to forward, cross-post, or link to this call for papers.

cfp categories: americanchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarypopular_cultureromantictheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 38144Thinking Backward: Reframing Lesbian Representation on Bad Girls (April 20-23, 2011)PCA/ACA & Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Associations mjonet@nmsu.edu1282969725americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: PCA/ACA & Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Associations contact email: mjonet@nmsu.edu

PCA/ACA & Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Associations
Joint Conference
April 20-23, 2011
San Antonio, TX
http://www.swtxpca.org
Proposal submission deadline: October 15, 2010
Conference hotel: Marriott Rivercenter San Antonio
101 Bowie Street
San Antonio, Texas 78205 USA
Phone: 1-210-223-1000

Panel Title—Thinking Backward: Reframing Lesbian Representation on Bad Girls

It has now been more than ten years since characters Helen Stewart (Simone Lahbib) and Nikki Wade (Mandana Jones) from series 1-3 on the successful British television program, Bad Girls entered the archives of lesbian representation and cultural memory. In the years since 1999-2001, the run of series 1-3, other television programs featuring lesbian characters have arrived, gone, or remain. Instead of measuring how far lesbian representations have come since the show's original broadcasting of the Helen-Nikki storyline, this panel seeks papers that take the turn back to series 1-3 to think through the layers of meaning attached to this representation. As Heather K. Love notes in Feeling Backwards: "Queers face a strange choice: is it better to move on toward a brighter future or to hang back and cling to the past? [. . .] Contemporary queers find ourselves in the odd situation of 'looking forward' while we are 'feeling backward' (27). To feel and to think backward to this show's portrayal of the Helen-Nikki storyline, as well as its general treatment of lesbians, women's issues, prison issues, and the fan communities that developed around the show, is to feel that tug of looking forward while seizing on to a decade's old televisual past that sometimes feels in front of the future in terms of mainstream representation of queer women and same-sex desire between women.

While this panel will consider all submissions focused on series 1-3, fan communities, and other issues tied this first three years of the series, some possible topics to consider are:

desire and identity
desire and literature/education
desire and reform
the conception of a kind of "homonormativity" (as Didi Herman calls it) that renders lesbian sexuality normative and desireable
rethinking of the "women in prison" genre
constructing queer community/family
notions of female leadership on the show
class
race
solidarity and dissonance
Nikki Wade as lesbian James Dean, Heathcliff, or Romatic Byronic Heroine
additional lesbian characters Denny Blood and Shaz Wiley

These suggested topics are only but a few possibilities to consider for this panel.

Please send 250-350 word abstracts to mjonet@nmsu.edu or to the physical address below by October 15, 2010.

Dr. M. Catherine Jonet, European Popular Culture and Literature Area Chair
MSC 3WSP
New Mexico State University
P.O. Box 30001
Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 38145Proposed Collection: 1980s American Horror Fiction, abstracts Oct. 30, 2010Steffen Hantkesteffenhantke@hotmail.com1282971249americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Steffen Hantkecontact email: steffenhantke@hotmail.com

Call for Papers

Proposed Collection: 1980s American Horror Fiction

Editor: Steffen Hantke, Sogang University
Deadline for Proposal/Abstract Submission: October 30, 2010

With the publication of William Peter Blatty's The Exorcist and Tom Tryon's The Other in 1971, as well as Stephen King's Carrie in 1975 and Salem's Lot in 1975, horror fiction in the U.S. began to emerge as a (sub-)literary genre capable of dominating the commercial market, in paperback and sometimes even in hardcover. By the 1980s, King's fiction, together with that by Peter Straub, Dean Koontz, and Anne Rice had become a staple of bestseller lists, drawing into the spotlight a host of other writers—some forgettable, but many talented, underappreciated, or by now altogether unduly forgotten—who added momentum, volume, and nuance to what was to become an unparalleled boom period for American horror fiction. For roughly a decade, horror fiction proved capable of outselling science fiction and fantasy. Creatively exhausted by commercial exploitation, however, the boom began to fade by the late 1980s and had ended altogether by the early 1990s. Though writers like King and Straub have survived the collapse, most of their compatriots have vanished from publication, moved to small presses, or switched to more lucrative genres. As a result, commercial horror fiction has, to the present day, never regained its commercial viability and market dominance.

Through a variety of approaches—to individual texts, authors and their careers, and marketing practices—the collection as a whole aims at exploring this boom period in American horror fiction as a coherent literary, cultural, and economic phenomenon, tracing its developmental arc and idiosyncratic shape.

Possible topics for individual essays include, but are not limited to:

- the prehistory of the boom (Ira Levin, William Peter Blatty, Tom Tryon, etc.)
- blockbuster authors (Stephen King, Peter Straub, Dean Koontz, Anne Rice, etc.)
- general authors (T.E.D. Klein, Joseph Citro, Michael McDowell, Charles Grant, Richard Laymon, etc.)
- publishing formats (experiments in serialization [King's Green Mile, McDowell's Blackwater, Saul's Blackstone Chronicles], single-author collections [Barker's Books of Blood], anthologies [McCauley's Dark Forces, Sammons' Splatterpunks], publishers and imprints [Avon, Tor, etc.], the magazine market, etc.)
- themes (regionalism, the American small town, etc.)
- contexts (the Reagan years, the end of the Cold War, mutual exchanges between fiction and cinema, other national literary traditions, genre fiction and literary fiction, horror fiction and other popular genres)
- production and reception (cover art, fan communities, etc.)
- literary style, aesthetic aspects

Also encouraged are interviews with authors, artists, literary agents, publishers, etc.

Proposals and abstracts should be submitted electronically only (as email attachments in WORD format), and should at least be two pages in length (the more detailed, the better); they should also be accompanied by a current CV. All submissions should constitute original work.

Please send your submission to:
Prof. Steffen Hantke, Sogang University, Seoul, S. Korea, at: steffenhantke@hotmail.com

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgeneral_announcementsjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturetwentieth_century_and_beyond 38146"Horror," SW/TX Popular Culture and American Culture Association, 4/2-23, 2011, San Antonio, TXSteffen Hantkesteffenhantke@hotmail.com1282981625americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Steffen Hantkecontact email: steffenhantke@hotmail.com

CALL FOR PAPERS
"HORROR"

Joint Conference of the PCA/ACA & Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Associations at the Marriott Rivercenter Conference Hotel on

April 20-23, 2011

in San Antonio, Texas

The area chair for Horror of the Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Association invites all interested scholars to submit papers on any aspect of horror in literature, film, television, or general culture.

If you are interested in being a presenter, please send a detailed abstract (300-400 words) for a paper of 18 to 20 minutes reading time via e-mail. Please provide contact information, such as name, mailing address, phone number, and especially e-mail address.

If you want to propose a panel of four speakers, or three speakers and one respondent, please include the following information: panel title; name and contact information of the panel chair; an abstract for each paper; contact information for each presenter.

The deadline for abstract and panel submissions to the area chair is December 15, 2010. Priority registration ends November 1, 2010.

For information about the registration process, registration fees, membership, graduate student awards and course credits, and information about travel and location, please consult the Southwest/Texas PCA/ACA's official web site: swtxpca.org

The conference will be held at the Marriott Rivercenter San Antonio, 101 Bowie Street, San Antonio, Texas 78205 USA. For information or reservation, call 1-210-223-1000.
Please send all abstracts, panel proposals, and queries to:

Prof. Steffen Hantke
Department of English, Sogang University
Seoul 100-611, South Korea
Tel. 82-2-705-8810, Fax 82-2-715-0705
steffenhantke@hotmail.com

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 38147Horror Area: 2011 PCA/ACA National Conference, 20-23 April, 2011Horror Area, Popular Culture Association / American Culture Associationpcahorror@gmail.com1283003149african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionromantictheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: Horror Area, Popular Culture Association / American Culture Associationcontact email: pcahorror@gmail.com

The Horror Area co-chairs of the Popular Culture Association invite interested scholars to submit papers on any aspect of horror in fiction, cinema, television, gaming and culture for the 2011 PCA/ACA National Convention to be held at the San Antonio Marriott Rivercenter & Riverwalk Hotels in San Antonio, Texas. The conference runs from 20 to 23 April, 2011.

Horror Co-Chairs:
Dr. James Iaccino, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Chicago, IL
Dr. Carl Sederholm, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
Kristopher Woofter, Concordia University, Montréal, QC

If you are interested in being a presenter, please send the following via email:
1) 100-250 word abstract, including title and full contact information (name, institutional mailing address, phone number[s], and email). Please send your proposal as a Word attachment, and paste the text in the body of the email.
2) Notification of any audio-visual needs
3) A current CV
4) Optional at time of proposal, required 2 weeks in advance of the conference date: a completed paper of not more than 15 minutes reading time (about 7 double-spaced pages)

The following panels and roundtables for 2011 may be of interest to you:
Panel Discussion: The Saw films
Panel Discussion: Horror and the Apocalyptic: Disaster, Alienation, Recuperation
Panel Discussion: Horror in the Age of Terror: Reflexivity, Hybridity and Intermediality
Roundtable Discussion: The Powers of Horror by Julia Kristeva
Roundtable Discussion: Horror and Pedagogy

If you would like to propose a panel of 4 speakers, or a roundtable discussion panel of between 4-6 participants, please include the following in a single document:
1) Panel or Roundtable title
2) Name and contact information for the Panel Chair
3) Titles and abstracts of each paper (or topic in the case of a roundtable)
4) CVs and contact information for each presenter
5) A statement of audiovisual needs

Please send all abstracts, papers, and queries to: pcahorror@gmail.com.

The deadline for submission of abstracts and/or papers is December 15, 2010.

PCA/ACA Horror Area webpage: http://www.pcaaca.org/areas/horror.php

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarypopular_culturepostcolonialreligionromantictheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 38148Short essays wanted: literature, justice, social change and educationChanging Lives Through Literaturecltl@umassd.edu1283004809african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centurygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Changing Lives Through Literaturecontact email: cltl@umassd.edu

Changing Lives Through Literature is an alternative sentencing program founded in 1991 on the power of literature to transform lives.

In 2008 we launched a blog, Changing Lives, Changing Minds: http://cltl.umassd.edu/blog.

We have featured essays from professors, graduate students, judges, lawyers, and other scholars from the U.S., Canada and the U.K. Topics range from literature and its impact on people to alternative sentencing and issues in our justice system.

We invite you to submit a 500-800 word piece to be featured on the site. Any topic that deals with literature or writing and the way in which they affect individuals (now or historically) is fair game. You might consider using one or more of the questions below as a jumping off point for an entry or bring ideas of your own to the blog.

* Is there a book that has profoundly impacted your life or way of thinking? Tell us about how you, yourself, have been transformed by a piece of literature.

* How does the act of "reading" change as our society grows more technologically advanced and dependent? Will there continue to be a place for the printed book or are we destined for a future where reading is limited to computer and Kindle screens? How does reading in an electronic medium differ from the experience of reading a book?

* How do individuals or groups of people create identity through reading and writing (either historically or currently)?

* How important is it for students to be able to see themselves in the texts they read in classes? What role should one's personal connections with the text play in classroom discussions?

* How have your writing experiences changed you? Is there a particular writing endeavor (such as a book, an essay, or a creative piece) that made you understand something about yourself or others?

These are just a few ideas. If your interests include criminal justice, politics, law, etc. we encourage you to bring those to the table as well.

If you are interested in submitting an essay, email us and we'll give you a list of available dates. No technical expertise required. Just send us your essay as an attachment to cltl@umassd.edu along with a 1-3 line bio.

cfp categories: african-americanamericanbibliography_and_history_of_the_bookchildrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centurygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspoetrytwentieth_century_and_beyond 38149Immagine e Forma nell'Estetica BaroccaNortheast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) Convention, New Brunswick (NJ) April 7-10, 2011mforlino@eden.rutgers.edu1283017546graduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarytheoryfull name / name of organization: Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) Convention, New Brunswick (NJ) April 7-10, 2011contact email: mforlino@eden.rutgers.edu

This panel invites proposals for interdisciplinary papers focusing on the re-examination of the Baroque Aesthetics. The renewed interest in the 'emblemistica' and renovated interpretation of metaphor, along with the new sensibility inspired by the scientific discoveries of the 17th century, contributed to the development and re-thinking of the concepts of 'immagine' and 'forma' that have been at the center of a lively debate ever since. The complex nature of the Baroque lends itself to a multifaceted approach in the fields of Literature, Philosophy, Art History and Literary Criticism.

Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:
1) Literature of the emblems
2) Treatises on 'arguzia'
3) Theories of metaphor
4) Deployment of iconic images in Poetry, Theater and Visual Arts
5) Images and allegories in Marino's Adone and La Galleria
6) Modern aspects of the Baroque
7) Metaphors and images in scientific treatises
8) Il "chiaroscuro"

Submission should be cut for presentation to a fifteen-minute presentation of the main argument (7-8 pages). Please send 500-word abstracts and a brief biography to Marino Forlino (mforlino@eden.rutgers.edu).

cfp categories: graduate_conferencesinterdisciplinarytheory 38150Call for Papers: "Idea of France" Conference, Nov. 2011Todd Reeserreeser@pitt.edu1283047022cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymedievalpostcolonialrenaissancetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Todd Reesercontact email: reeser@pitt.edu

CALL FOR PAPERS

Interdisciplinary Conference at the University of Pittsburgh

November 10-12, 2011

"The Idea of France" / "L'Idée de la France"

We welcome abstracts from all fields (literature, history, political science, sociology, anthropology, law, religion, art, music, cultural studies, film studies, gender studies, etc.) that treat the question of the idea of France or Frenchness in any time period from the middle ages to the twenty-first century. Papers may be delivered in English or French.

Tentative keynote speakers include David Bell (History, Princeton), Lawrence Kritzman (Cultural Theory, Dartmouth), Olivier Dutheillet de Lamothe (Law, Cour de Cassation, France), Domna Stanton (Literature/Women's Studies, CUNY), and Ezra Suleiman (Political Science, Princeton).

Please send 150-250 word abstracts (English or French) to idfr@pitt.edu.

Due date: January 10, 2011.

For further information, contact Todd Reeser, reeser@pitt.edu, conference coordinator

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinarymedievalpostcolonialrenaissancetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 38151A (Post)Secular Age: Protestant Epistemologies and the American NovelNEMLAkhoward@rci.rutgers.edu1283050028americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturereligionfull name / name of organization: NEMLAcontact email: khoward@rci.rutgers.edu

Post-secular critics are currently challenging the theory that the rise of historical empiricism, as a mode of thought, replaced religious belief and praxis. According to theorist Benedict Anderson, the seventeenth century ushered in a break between a religious cosmology and history, creating a need to link fraternity, power, and time in new ways. Nationalism, an ideology that links subjective identity to a history unfolding in "homogeneous, empty time," filled this need. New literary genres like the novel presented stories that occurred in the time and space of the nation, offering readers a means of identifying as members of a community with a common, secular history.

This panel invites papers that challenge Anderson's well-known thesis, specifically as it posits a single epistemological function for the realist novel. As post-secular critics are aware, the realist novel does not simply hasten secular modes of thinking: instead, it engages the shifting grounds of contemporary epistemology from a variety of positions, many of which are and have been explicitly religious. We are particularly interested in papers that deal with the wide array of popular Protestant novels in America. Throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, such novels have asked readers to imagine themselves simultaneously as historical and soteriological subjects. Our question is then: What do popular Protestant novels tell us about the relationship between historical empiricism, secularism, and religious belief? Could it be that these novels complicate dominate narratives of secularism in ways we have yet to account for?

Please send 250 word abstracts to Kathleen Howard at khoward@rci.rutgers.edu by September 30th.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesinterdisciplinarypopular_culturereligion 38152U.S. Latino/a Literary Culture at CEA 2011 (11/1/2010, 3/31-4/2/2011).Joseph M. Viera / College English Associationjviera1@naz.edu1283052399americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitypostcolonialfull name / name of organization: Joseph M. Viera / College English Associationcontact email: jviera1@naz.edu

U.S. Latino/a Literary Culture

Call for Papers, CEA 2011 | FORTUNES
42nd Annual Conference | March 31 - April 2, 2011 | St. Petersburg, Florida

The Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront, 333 First Street South, St. Petersburg, Florida 33701; (727) 894-5000

Special Topic: U.S. Latino/a Literary Culture: We are seeking paper proposals (approximately 250-words in length) for panels that address the general conference theme of "Fortunes" and how this concept applies to U.S. Latino/a literary production. Proposals that examine "Fortunes" in relation to issues of race, gender, sexual orientation, class, ethnicity, religion, spirituality, immigration, globalization, labor, power, among others, are especially welcome.

Submission deadline: November 1, 2010 at http://cea-web.org/
The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations for our 42nd annual conference.

Submission: August 15 - November 1, 2010
Please see the submission instructions at http://cea-web.org/

Conference Theme: Fortunes
Money, luck, friendship, health, a warm place to sleep. In a world staggered by economic decline and natural catastrophes, what are the new boundaries of success and misfortune? How do art, literature, and the classroom respond to the Rota Fortunae? For our 2011 meeting, CEA invites papers and panels that explore Fortune as both a daunting challenge and an elusive ideal. For more information, please see the full CFP at http://cea-web.org/

General Call for Papers
CEA also welcomes proposals for presentations in any of the areas English departments typically encompass, including literature, creative writing, composition, technical communication, linguistics, and film. We also welcome papers on areas that influence our work as academics, including student demographics, student/instructor accountability and assessment, student advising, academic leadership in departments and programs, and the place of the English department in the university.

Membership
All presenters at the 2011 CEA conference must become members of CEA by January 1, 2011. To join CEA, please go to http://cea-web.org/

More information
* Get short, timely messages from CEA via Twitter: http://twitter.com/CEAtweet
* Connect with CEA on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CollegeEnglishAssociation
* Find out more about conference lodging and registration: http://cea-web.org/
* Contact CEA officers: http://cea-web.org/

Other questions? Please email cea.english@gmail.com.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitypostcolonial 38153CFP (Kalamazoo): Medieval Studies/Medieval Texts: Responding to (Campus) Diversity InitiativesNational Endowment for the Humanities; Organizer: James M. Palmerjmpalmer@pvamu.edu1283057008african-americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinternational_conferencesmedievalfull name / name of organization: National Endowment for the Humanities; Organizer: James M. Palmercontact email: jmpalmer@pvamu.edu

NEH is sponsoring a roundtable on "Medieval Studies/Medieval Texts: Responding to (Campus) Diversity Initiatives" at the 46th International Congress on Medieval Studies, May 12-15, 2011.

The task of teaching medieval history and literature to an increasingly diverse student body in the United States raises new and potentially productive intellectual questions: for instance, about the function of our disciplines in contemporary society, and about the social and ideological underpinnings of these disciplines in the past. Furthermore, the diversification in the classroom (either realized or desired) may destabilize old paradigms, and point towards new models of intellectual inquiry. As a start to answering these questions, this roundtable panel seeks participants to share how texts they study and courses they teach (or take) respond to diversity initiatives in various ways and the results of such initiatives. Topics covered by roundtable panelists could include (but are not limited to):

1) How do medieval texts or the medieval studies curriculum fulfill state, campus, or department diversity initiatives?

2) How do we attract students of diverse backgrounds to courses in medieval studies?

3) How might we connect medieval texts to the scholarly concerns of African American, Latino, or diasporic studies?

4) What medieval texts are being used to meet diversity initiatives and why?

5) How can we use the challenges associated with teaching a diverse student population to create opportunities for innovative teaching and research?

6) How does an increasingly diverse student body generate new paradigms or help us to rethink the social function of the university?

7) What are graduate programs with concentrations in medieval studies doing to encourage diversity among future scholars in the humanities?

8) What experiences can graduate students supported by diversity initiatives share?

9) What are Tribal, Hispanic, and African-American serving universities and colleges doing to increase diversity in academia?

Because this is a roundtable, participants may present a paper in another session. Speakers will likely have no more than 7 minutes each. Submission Details: Please send a very brief abstract of approximately 100-150 words to James M. Palmer at jmpalmer@pvamu.edu by September 15, 2010. Along with a title for the presentation, please send a completed Participant Information Form, which can be found at:

http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html

cfp categories: african-americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinternational_conferencesmedieval 38154[UPDATE] NeMLA Panel on Women Writers and Psychoanalysis (Abstract Deadline September 30, 2010; Conference April 7-10, 2011)Northeast Modern Language AssociationKristinaMarieDarling@yahoo.com1283058923americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturescience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Northeast Modern Language Associationcontact email: KristinaMarieDarling@yahoo.com

I'm still seeking submissions for a panel on American women writers' responses to Freud, which will take place at the 2011 Northeast Modern Language Association Conference. Submissions should address one of the following subjects: Revisions of Freudian texts; Alternatives to the Freudian model of psychoanalytic practice; Responses to Freud as a cultural figure; Writing psychoanalysis through form, style, and technique. Please include an abstract and a brief biographical statement. Email submissions to Kristina Marie Darling, KristinaMarieDarling@yahoo.com by September 30th, 2010.

More information about the conference can be found here:
http://www.nemla.org/convention/2011/index.html

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesgender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturescience_and_culturetheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 38155Women and Wilderness: Ecofeminism in Early American LiteratureNortheast Modern Language Associationabourne@reynolds.edu1283105460americanecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centurygender_studies_and_sexualityfull name / name of organization: Northeast Modern Language Associationcontact email: abourne@reynolds.edu

This panel invites papers which take an ecofeminist approach to American literature written by women in the 17th to mid-19th centuries, fiction and non-fiction. Consider texts that explore ways in which women interact with the natural world, and the consequences of such relationships. How do women in the texts (both writers and characters) portray relationships with the land? Are they aware of, complicit in or attempting to resist strategies of patriarchal domination which are also being applied to the environment? Please send 300-500 word abstracts to Ashley Bourne at abourne@reynolds.edu. Deadline Sept. 30th. Include in email: Name and affiliation, email address and AV requirements if any.

cfp categories: americanecocriticism_and_environmental_studieseighteenth_centurygender_studies_and_sexuality 38156Contemporary Women's Novels: The Changing Story? (NeMLA 2011 4/7-4/11) New Brunswick, NJ: Abstracts due Sept. 30Karen E. Waldron, College of the Atlantickwaldron@coa.edu1283107231cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementstheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Karen E. Waldron, College of the Atlanticcontact email: kwaldron@coa.edu

To what extent can contemporary fiction by women and about women from different cultures can be brought together coherently for discussion? What has happened to such fiction as women's political and social conditions have been challenged? This session will investigate how women's fictional plotting has changed with globalization and what that contributes to the comparability/incomparability of these works. Email 300-500 word abstracts about recent women's novels in a comparative / world literature teaching context to kwaldron@coa.edu.
Chair: Karen E. Waldron
Areas: Women's and Gender Studies; World Literatures (non-European Languages)

http://www.nemla.org/convention/2011

Convenient by train to Newark Airport and New York City, Rutgers University is welcoming NeMLA to the beautiful university town of New Brunswick for its 2011 Convention. The NeMLA Board and Rutgers are working together to bring top scholars as speakers and to create special events that will draw on the rich resources of the area. Sessions will run Thursday afternoon through Sunday midday, with pre-convention workshops under consideration.

Abstract deadline for most sessions: September 30, 2010

Please include with your abstract:

Name and Affiliation
Email address
Postal address
Telephone number
A/V requirements (if any; $10 handling fee with registration)

Interested participants may submit abstracts to more than one NeMLA session; however panelists can only present one paper (panel or seminar). Convention participants may present a paper at a panel and also present at a creative session or participate in a roundtable. If your abstract is accepted, do not confirm your participation if you may cancel for another NeMLA session.

cfp categories: cultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementstheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 38157[REMINDER] Interrogating Complicities: Postcolonial, Queer and the Threat of the Normative; ABSTRACT DEADLINE SEPT. 5thGender, Women and Sexuality Studies, University of Minnesota, Twin Citiescomplicitiesconf@gmail.com1283112570african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialtheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Gender, Women and Sexuality Studies, University of Minnesota, Twin Citiescontact email: complicitiesconf@gmail.com

Title: Interrogating Complicities: Postcolonial, Queer and the Threat of the Normative
Date: November 15th - 16th, 2010
ABSTRACT DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 5th

As verb, noun, adjective, "queer" is a term that acts through two somewhat paradoxical forces. While an avowedly dissenting and critical stance towards the normative mainstream, it flattens and even normalizes myriad sexualities, liminal bodies and critical positions.
Like "queer", the postcolonial is positioned as a cultural process and reading practice that goes against and even beyond – in this case, the colonial. However, conversations between these ambitious fields of critical inquiry have made their normalizing gestures and the lacunae in their theoretical vision more apparent. With continued allegations of heterosexism within Postcolonial Studies and neocolonialism within Queer Studies, both disciplinary domains find themselves having to answer the charge of their respective complicities with the normative.
Postcolonial and transnational queer theorists have noted that in reading 'queer' as always resistant to and transgressing the norm, we run the risk of conflating "queer" itself with "modernity" and "progress" in uncritical ways. What kind of political action and scholarship become possible when the postcolonial denaturalizes the function of "queer", and finds it colluding with and implicated in dominant formations? How might the postcolonial's interlacing with dominant structures complicate this reading?
We invite work that explores these tensions and that interrogates the purported disciplinary complicity with normativities, especially as '"queer" travels and mutates over scale and space to the postcolony.
Some Questions to Consider:

1. As they travel to postcolonial contexts, do the terms "Queer" and "LGBT" become co-extensive, or does the postcolonial help bring the two terms into conflict?
2. What kinds of historical conditions and contemporary discourses allow for 'gay rights' to become the proof of Western "freedoms", and the new guise for Western cultural imperialism?
3. What are the connections between the emergence of discourses around a queer "identity", like global human rights, agency, development and realization of the self; and the ascendance of neoliberal conceptions of labor efficiency and privatization in postcolonial nations?
4. What are the implications of the ways in which "gay rights" deploy nationalist discourses to gain equal citizenship, even as they create spatial disparities (rural/urban, modern/traditional, mainstream/ "vernacular", national/regional, progressive/orthodox etc) within the nation?
5. How does "queer" travel from its historical specificity within local (US) contexts to non-local postcolonial contexts? What is gained or lost within the predominant conception of "queer", as it moves and becomes more widely circulated?
6. How are 'queer temporalities' calibrated to postcolonial contexts: what are the gains or risks of investing in queer utopias (marriage, property rights, etc.)?
7. What might be the limits or possibilities of oppositional theorizations of queer temporalities within scholarly or activist work in postcolonial contexts?
8. In what ways might the discussion around the distinctions, as well as the tensions, between the postcolonial and the transnational inflect queer theory?

Abstract due: Midnight, September 5th, 2010
Abstract length: 300 – 350 words
Please include a one paragraph bio (do not exceed 100 words) with your abstract to complicitiesconf@gmail.com

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualityinterdisciplinaryinternational_conferencespopular_culturepostcolonialtheatretheorytravel_writingtwentieth_century_and_beyond 38158[UPDATE] 2010 MCRS Graduate Conference, Oct. 2 2010Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies; University of Massachusetts Amherstgsargent@english.umass.edu1283115215bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryrenaissancetheatrefull name / name of organization: Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies; University of Massachusetts Amherstcontact email: gsargent@english.umass.edu

Dear Graduate Program Directors, Administrators, and Grad Students:

Following is an announcement for the Eighth Annual Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies Graduate Conference. Please distribute this and the following CFP to any students who may be interested in submitting an abstract.

The Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst will host its annual graduate student conference on Saturday, October 2, 2010. Graduate students are invited to submit abstracts for a ten to fifteen minute paper on any range of topics or approaches to literature and history, including textual studies, performance history, philosophy, print culture, religious studies, gender studies, post-colonial interpretations, and other new theoretical perspectives. The purpose of the conference is to provide graduate students with an opportunity to share their work and place it in a greater context of interests and concerns. The conference is designed to foster conversation among students who share similar challenges and construct a space where participants may expect serious feedback on their work.

Please send an abstract of 250-300 words by email or email attachment to Gregory Sargent (gsargent@english.umass.edu) by Wednesday, September 15, 2010. For more information on the conference, you can visit the website http://people.umass.edu/ppalmer/Site/MCRSGC.html.

We are pleased to announce that Prof. Jeff Dolven of Princeton University will be giving the keynote address. In addition to winning a Mellon/ACLS Fellowship for Junior Faculty, Prof. Dolven was honored with the Donald A. Stauffer Preceptorship at Princeton University. He has published on Spencer and Renaissance poetry and his book is called Scenes of Instruction in Renaissance Romance from the University of Chicago Press.

We are organizing the conference to bring graduate students with similar interests together to share their work. Last year's conference had an intimate feel with all participants able to view the other presentations. As before, we intend to divide the conference into several small panels, with ample time for discussion among peers, and we welcome the attendance of faculty from your department as well.

Thank you for your assistance and please feel free to contact me with any questions or comments.

Best,
Katey Roden
Gregory Sargent

Conference Organizers

cfp categories: bibliography_and_history_of_the_bookgraduate_conferencesinterdisciplinaryrenaissancetheatre 38159[UPDATE] Redeeming Modernity: Economy, Religion, and Literature in Modern America. NeMLA (Abstact deadline 9/30/10)Andrew Ball, Purdue University ajball@purdue.edu1283116582african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturereligiontheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyondfull name / name of organization: Andrew Ball, Purdue University contact email: ajball@purdue.edu

42nd Annual Convention, Northeast Modern Language Association
April 7-10, 2011
Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ

The received wisdom tells us that the modernization of American culture and society was contingent upon its secularization. And yet, when we look to both canonical works of American modernism and to contributions to the "cultural front," we find an abiding concern for the religious that troubles this dominant narrative. This panel seeks to reexamine the multivalent modernist concern for the religious in order to reassess its place in early 20th century American literature and culture, to analyze the myth of the 'secular age,' and to determine the place of religion in the conflict between capital and labor.

Paper topics may include, but are not limited to:

Eliot's 'The Idea of a Christian Society'
Faulkner's Christology
Dos Passos, Hagiography, and Cultural Sacralization
H. D. and Religion
Louis Zukofsky, Judaism, and Kabbalah
Moses and Modernism
The Social Gospel in Modern America
Religion and the Cultural Front
Religion and the CPUSA (Communist Party of the United States of America)
Religion and the SPA (Socialist Party of America)
The Literature, Journalism, and / or Activism of Christian Socialism
Religion and Modern Social Theory
"Practical Christianity" vs. "Churchianity" in Modern American Literature
Christianity and Capitalism
Theology in Modern American
Paul Tillich and Christian Socialism
Reinhold Niebuhr on Socialism, Capitalism, and / or Christian Realism
Bonhoeffer in America
Modernist Cultural Capital and Aesthetic Consecration
The Idol and the Icon in Modern Art
Literary accounts of a 'proletarian Jesus'
Bruce Barton's _The Man Nobody Knows_

Please send 300-500 word abstracts to Andrew Ball (ajball@purdue.edu) on or before September 30, 2010, with 'NeMLA' in the subject line. Along with your abstract, please include your contact information (email address, postal address, and phone number), academic affiliation, and A/V requirements.

cfp categories: african-americanamericancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesethnicity_and_national_identitygender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarymodernist studiespoetrypopular_culturereligiontheatretheorytwentieth_century_and_beyond 38160CFP Open Graves, Open Minds: Vampires and the Undead in Modern Culture (Edited Volume and Special Journal Issue)University of Hertfordshires.george@herts.ac.uk1283116613childrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturescience_and_culturetheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorianfull name / name of organization: University of Hertfordshirecontact email: s.george@herts.ac.uk

CFP Open Graves, Open Minds: Vampires and the Undead in Modern Culture (Edited Volume and Special Journal Issue)

The irony of creatures with no reflection becoming such a pervasive reflection of modern culture pleases in a dark way. Since their animation out of folk materials in the nineteenth century, by Polidori, as Varney and in Le Fanu and Stoker, vampires have been continually reborn in modern culture. They have stalked texts from Marx's image of the leeching capitalist, through Pater's Lady Lisa of tainted knowledge, to the multifarious incarnations in contemporary fictions in print and on screen. They have enacted a host of anxieties and desires, shifting shape as the culture they are brought to life in itself changes form. More recently, their less charismatic undead cousins, zombies, have been dug up in droves to represent various fears and crises in contemporary culture.

Essays are sought for a book-length collection on the theme of the undead—vampires and zombies—in modern culture and for a parallel special journal issue. The aim of the book is to relate the undead in literature, art, and other media to questions concerning gender, technology, consumption, and social change. It will examine these creatures in all their various manifestations and cultural meanings. This is a continuation of the research project initiated by the 'Open Graves, Open Minds: Vampires and the Undead in Modern Culture' conference, held at the University of Hertfordshire, UK, in April 2010. The volume will be published in 2012 and launched as part of the celebrations to mark the centenary of Bram Stoker's death.

Possible topics may include (but are not limited to) the following:

• sexuality and the (living or undead) body
• identity politics
• Goth culture and the undead
• new technologies
• the metaphor of reflection
• celluloid vampires: adaptations and incarnations
• teen vampire/zombie fiction
• undead TV
• blood, money, and circulation
• parasitism, production, and consumption
• decomposition and decadence
• the Undead as Other (nationality, class, gender, etc.)
• vampiric art and/or the artist as vampire
• Marx and the vampire

As the book is intended, in part, to be a reader for a new MA programme on 'Reading the Vampire: Science, Sexuality and Alterity in Modern Culture' we also seek chapters that discuss the following texts:

• John Polidori, The Vampyre
• Early vampire plays including Charles Nodier, The Vampire and James Robinson Plance, The Vampire, or the Bride of the Islands
• James Malcolm Rymer, Varney the Vampire, or The Feast of Blood, Book one
• Sheridan Le Fanu, Carmilla
• Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Grey
• Bram Stoker, Dracula
• George Sylvester Viereck, The House of Vampire
• Anne Rice, Interview with the Vampire
• Joss Whedon, Buffy, the Vampire Slayer
• Stephanie Meyer, Twilight
• Marcus Sedgwick, My Swordhand is Singing
• Daniel Waters, Generation Dead

Other chapters that complement this programme may be included but will also certainly be considered for the companion journal special issue. Some excellent papers were presented at the conference but additional proposals are sought eagerly. Both new and established scholars will be included.

Please submit abstracts of 800-900 words together with a brief biographical statement (200 words) by December 1, 2010 to Sam George (s.george@herts.ac.uk) and Bill Hughes (bill@enlightenment.fsnet.co.uk). You should include your contact details (email address, postal address and phone number) and send your contribution as an attachment in MSWord format. Completed essays of 6000-8000 words will be due by March 2011.

cfp categories: childrens_literaturecultural_studies_and_historical_approacheseighteenth_centuryethnicity_and_national_identityfilm_and_televisiongender_studies_and_sexualitygeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinaryjournals_and_collections_of_essayspopular_culturescience_and_culturetheatretwentieth_century_and_beyondvictorian 38161Film Theory Area2011 PCA/ACA & Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture AssociationsJenkinsj@u.arizona.edu1283118398americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetheoryfull name / name of organization: 2011 PCA/ACA & Southwest/Texas Popular Culture and American Culture Associationscontact email: Jenkinsj@u.arizona.edu

Call for Papers: Film Theory Area
2011 PCA/ACA & Southwest/Texas Popular Culture
and American Culture Associations

Joint Conference: April 20-23, 2011, San Antonio, TX

http://www.swtxpca.org
Proposal submission deadline: December 15, 2010
Conference hotel: Marriott Rivercenter San Antonio
101 Bowie Street
San Antonio, Texas 78205 USA
Phone: 1-210-223-1000

Proposals are now being sought for review in the Film Theory Area. Review begins immediately and continues until December 15, 2010. Listed below are some suggestions for possible presentations, but topics not included here are also welcome:

• Precinema, Archaeology of Cinema and Early Film Theory
• Qu'est-ce que le cinema? Classical Film Theory and its Discontents
• Walter Benjamin/Mechanical Reproduction
• Apparatus Theory
• Spectatorship and Stars
• Auteur Theory
• Semiotics, Psychoanalysis, Feminism, and Beyond
• Film Genre and Film Aesthetics
• Theories of Third Cinema
• Emerging theories of cinema in the digital age
• Intersections of Film Theory and cultural, literary, or fine arts theory

Inquiries regarding this area and/or abstracts of 250 words may be sent to Jennifer L. Jenkins at the email address below no later than December 15, 2010. Please include a current curriculum vitae and a working bibliography for your paper.

Film Theory Area
Jennifer L. Jenkins, Ph.D.
University of Arizona
jenkinsj@email.arizona.edu

The 2011 SW/TX PCA/ACA and PCA/ACA Joint Conference will be held in San Antonio. Join us next spring, as a returning or first-time participant, at this popular culture conference that draws an international roster of participants. Further details regarding the conference (listing of all panel areas, hotel, registration, tours, etc.) can be found at http://www.swtxpca.org. A number of graduate student awards are given each year, and graduate student travel grants are also available.

cfp categories: americancultural_studies_and_historical_approachesfilm_and_televisiongeneral_announcementsinterdisciplinarypopular_culturetheory

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