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[UPDATE] Hemingway: Fact or Fiction?: ALA Conference, Boston, MA, May 26-29, 2011 (Revised Deadline: Jan. 10, 2011)

updated: 
Wednesday, December 22, 2010 - 12:47am
The Ernest Hemingway Society

Hemingway's longstanding fame and reputation has fostered a variety of tall tales, stories, allegations and attributions. Some are blatantly false. Others are surprisingly true. Still others linger in the space between fact and fiction. This panel seeks papers that examine the history and circumstances of any of these Hemingway myths, legends, and misappropriations or explore the question of what it is about Hemingway or his writing that creates this mythical aura of potential misinformation around the reality of his life and career.

The Global South Asian Diaspora in the 21st Century: Antecedents and Prospects.

updated: 
Tuesday, December 21, 2010 - 5:18pm
The University of the West Indies (St. Augustine)

2011 DIASPORA CONFERENCE: The Global South Asian Diaspora in the 21st Century: Antecedents and Prospects.

Sponsors: The University of the West Indies (St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago), The Yesu Persaud Centre for Caribbean Studies, University of Warwick (Coventry, United Kingdom), and the National Council of Indian Culture (NCIC), Trinidad and Tobago.

Venues: St. Augustine Campus, The University of the West Indies and Divali Nagar, Chaguanas, Trinidad.

Dates: Wednesday 1st June to Saturday 4th June 2011.

Stony Brook Graduate English Conference

updated: 
Tuesday, December 21, 2010 - 3:33pm
Stony Brook University English Department

Date: Friday, March 11, 2011
Location: Stony Brook Manhattan Campus, Midtown NYC

Keynote Speaker: Prof. Stanley Aronowitz – CUNY Graduate Center

Event Description:

Home to the longest-running graduate conference in the nation, the English Department at Stony Brook University invites scholars of all disciplines to submit papers to its 2011 Manhattan event.

[UPDATE] Revolution! A Regional Graduate Student Literature Conference. April 2, 2011

updated: 
Tuesday, December 21, 2010 - 11:38am
Christina Hauck, Department of English, Kansas State University

At our inaugural Kansas State University Regional Graduate Student Conference in Literature, we will explore the ways in which revolutions of all kinds have affected (and continue to affect) our discipline. Revolution! is inspired by Jasbir Puar's groundbreaking work, Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times, which critiques contemporary configurations of sexuality, race, gender, nation, class, and ethnicity. Using Puar's work as a touchstone for revolutionary readings, our conference will examine representations of revolution in its various forms—cultural, political, textual, and theoretical—in British and American literature composed during any period.

[UPDATE] Deadline Approaching (1/3/11) "ANIMAL.MACHINE.SOVEREIGN."

updated: 
Tuesday, December 21, 2010 - 10:06am
Department of Comparative Literature, SUNY Buffalo

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PLEASE VISIT THE CONFERENCE WEBSITE FOR MORE INFORMATION

http://animalmachinesovereign.wordpress.com

KEYNOTES:
Timothy Campbell (Cornell)
Catherine Malabou (Universite de Paris X-Nanterre, SUNY Buffalo)
David E. Johnson (SUNY Buffalo)

Contributors to the conference must be currently enrolled graduate students (in any discipline), and are encourage to engage in presentations that probe the political constitution of the human-animal divide as a condition for thinking sovereignty, the State, nation, law and politics in general.

Edited Collection. Call For Submissions.

updated: 
Tuesday, December 21, 2010 - 9:01am
Libidinal Lives: Economies of Desire in the Long Nineteenth Century

In his controversial work Libidinal Economy (1974) Jean-Franҫois Lyotard famously remarked 'every political economy is libidinal'. With this radical pronouncement, Lyotard identified all hegemonic structures as susceptible to the affective ebb and flow of desire. Forming the cornerstone of the new 'libidinal materialism', Libidinal Economy, alongside Deleuze and Guattari's Anti-Oedipus (1972), saw the desiring body as inextricably bound up with economic, political and fiscal operations. In the decades that followed, a wealth of theoretical work drew on this challenging juxtaposition of the libidinal and the economic.

Whose Right to Know? The Worldwide Web and the Free Market of Ideas, Vol. 1, No. 4 Spring & Summer 2011

updated: 
Tuesday, December 21, 2010 - 12:04am
Synaesthesia: Communication Across Cultures / Graduate School of Intercultural Communication, Okinawa Christian University

Presently receiving and reviewing submissions for the Spring & Summer 2011 issue.

Authors are asked to examine meanings or perceptions of 'freedom' and/or 'speech' across the Worldwide Web that clash or align with conventional wisdom or common practices.

Possible themes, topics to be explored (in no way exhaustive):

1. How is the Worldwide Web used as a political, cultural, economic, military, or hegemonic tool to maintain free speech or curb it?

2. How does the Worldwide Web itself embody a political, cultural, military, economic, or hegemonic agenda?

3. What are the underlying, un-stated aims of those people or institutions that seek to limit the free market of ideas?

Film Studies: Spring 2011, Issue 5 - February 28, 2011 Due Date

updated: 
Monday, December 20, 2010 - 8:45pm
Pennsylvania Literary Journal (Anaphora Literary Press)

This winter break I (English Instructor at the Edinboro University of Pennsylvania) have found myself watching Buffy, Stargate, as well as new film releases like Splice, Resident Evil, and Shrek through Netscape. It is frequently difficult for me to find a film on Netscape that I haven't seen before and they have most of them. My independent Pennsylvania Literary Journal, http://sites.google.com/site/pennsylvaniajournal, just finished an issue titled British Literature, for which we also included one general essay called, "Chronicle of a Movie Extra: When Background Becomes Foreground," by Dr.

[UPDATE] EXTENDED DEADLINE to JAN 15th! Writing Democracy: A Rhetoric of (T)Here

updated: 
Monday, December 20, 2010 - 5:23pm
EGAD!/Federation Rhetoric Symposium

GOOD NEWS: Deadline has been extended to January 15, 2011.

Writing Democracy: A Rhetoric of (T)Here
Increasingly, humanities scholars and educators are attending to the local, the everyday, the public, and the “ordinary.” Trends like these in rhetoric and composition suggest the field has taken what Paula Matthieu has called “the public turn” (Tactics of Hope, 2005) and foreground the real-world implications of and applications for our work. Such trends also illuminate tensions and stark contrasts between constructs like public and private (Welch, Living Room, 2008), local and global (Gold, Rhetoric at the Margins, 2008), here and there, us and them (Duffy, Writing From These Roots, 2007).

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