Literature and Philosophy 1500-1700

full name / name of organization: 
University of Sussex

The Centre for Early Modern and Medieval Studies (CEMMS: http://www.sussex.ac.uk/cemms/) at the University of Sussex is pleased to announce its forthcoming Postgraduate Conference on the theme of 'Literature and Philosophy 1500-1700', which will take place on the 14th-16th July 2015.

This conference will explore the relationship between early modern literature and philosophical thought, theories and issues. How philosophical was literature in this period? Did literature and philosophy work in symbiosis or discordantly? How are philosophical ideas approached in early modern literary texts? In what ways could literature function to promote or critique philosophical ideas? What was the role of commercial literature in disseminating philosophical thought? How did circulation of courtly literature influence contemporary political and philosophical thinking? What was the role of different textual mediums (such as codices, pamphlets or newsbooks) in disseminating philosophical ideas? How were philosophical theories engaged with in poetry, prose or drama? Did the genre or medium matter?

We welcome abstracts of 200-300 words for individual papers of 20 minutes or of 600 words for panels of three related papers. These could be on topics including but not limited to:

Aristotelianism
Atheism
Augustinism
Averroism
Casuistry
Epicurianism
Equivocation
Ethics/ Moral philosophy
Figures of Space
Humanism
Logic
Machiavellianism
Philosophy of Nature
Philosophy of Religion
Platonism/Neo-Platonism
Political philosophy
Rationalism
Scepticism
Scholasticism
Stoicism
Thomism
Toleration

Please submit your abstract along with your institution, paper title and a brief biography to litphilconference@sussex.ac.uk by 16th February 2015.

Plenary speakers: Katrin Ettenhuber (Pembroke, University of Cambridge); Neil Rhodes (University of St Andrews); Christopher Tilmouth (Peterhouse, University of Cambridge).

Roundtable discussants: Katrin Ettenhuber, Christopher Tilmouth, John Lee (Bristol), and Paul Davies (Sussex).