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CfP: Artificial Humans in Children's Literature (essay collection)

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Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 7:50am
Dr. Sabine Planka

The ambition to create an artificial human being is as old as humankind itself. The ancient Greeks had Hephaistos who built living golden statutes and who created Pandora to take revenge for the theft of fire by Prometheus. Jewish legends tell stories of the Golem, a being made out of mud, to protect the Jews. The alchemists developed a recipe to create the homunculus. Around 250 A.D. Clemens Romanus reported that Simon Magus created a homunculus by changing air into water into blood into flesh. And Paracelsus said – referring to the process of putrefaction – that a homunculus can be created by rotting human sperm in a vessel warmed by horse manure for forty days.

SAMLA Special Session: Afterlife in the African Diaspora: A Seminar/Workshop (Abstracts 5/15/15;papers 10/1/15;conf 11/13-15/15)

updated: 
Tuesday, March 31, 2015 - 2:30am
South Atlantic Modern Language Association Conference

This seminar/workshop seeks to spark a critical conversation about how historical subjects and historical texts within the African Diaspora get re-fashioned, re-animated, and re-articulated, as well as parodied, nostalgized, and defamiliarized, to establish an afterlife for African Atlantic identities and narratives. Participants will consider how—as transnational and transhistorical sites of memory—particular performances (textual, visual, or embodied) circulate and imagine anew the meaning of prior personal and textual narratives liberated from their originary context.

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