"Ruined!" On Failed Adaptations from Page to Screen | NeMLA 2016 (Abstract Submission Deadline: September 30, 2015)

full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association

This session will explore adaptations that fail in some way. Among our goals, we would like to identify what could be productive about failed adaptations. How do such failures identify what not to do, and can an adaptation that fails to be faithful to its source material still produce a valuable, worthwhile text? We are particularly interested in proposals that look at the adaptation of older artistic and literary forms in online and/or interactive content.

Submit abstracts (300 words maximum) by September 30, 2015, to Session ID#15658 at https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/S/15658

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An adaptation from page to screen is fraught with tension due to potentially conflicting goals: on the one hand, adhering to its source material, and on the other hand, attempting to make something new. Adaptation can be imagined as an argument between the creator of the original text and the creator of its adaptation, hilariously - and perhaps accurately - represented by Nicolas Cage and Meryl Streep's characters cursing each other in the appropriately titled film Adaptation.

This session will explore adaptations that fail in some way. Among our goals, we would like to identify what could be productive about failed adaptations. How do such failures identify what not to do? And can an adaptation that fails to be faithful to its source material still produce a valuable, worthwhile text?

Potential topics will include not only those adaptations that diverge so drastically from the plot, characterization, and setting of the original story but also the formal differences. How does the screen fail to adapt more covert aspects present in narration? How is the fantastic reduced to the realistic in image, performance, and setting? Which ekphrastic challenges did the creators fail to adapt moving between media?

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In Spring 2016, the Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA) will meet in Hartford, Connecticut, for its 47th Annual Convention. Every year, this event affords NeMLA's principal opportunity to carry on a tradition of lively research and pedagogical exchange in language and literature.

Please join us for this convention, which will feature approximately 400 sessions, dynamic speakers, and cultural events. Interested participants may submit abstracts to more than one NeMLA session; however, panelists can only present one paper (panel or seminar). Convention participants may present a paper at a panel and also present at a creative session or participate in a roundtable.

Full information regarding the 2016 Call for Papers may be found on NeMLA's website: https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/cfp

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Contact Info:
Derek McGrath (SUNY Stony Brook), derek.s.mcgrath@gmail.com