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CFPanelists: "Black Narratives of Home/Property in American Literature" [DUE 1.25.16]

updated: 
Sunday, December 27, 2015 - 6:01pm
American Studies Association

Toni Morrison writes in her first novel 'The Bluest Eye' (1970): "Knowing that there was such a thing as outdoors bred in us a hunger for property, for ownership. The firm possession of a yard, a porch, a grape arbor. Propertied black people spent all their energies, all their love, on their nests" (18). This passage brings immediately to mind the thematic preoccupation with property and landholding throughout American literary history—from Nathaniel Hawthorne's 'House of the Seven Gables' to William Faulkner's Sutpen's Hundred, Willa Cather's Blue Mesa to Arthur Miller's Willy Loman—and the place of Black narrative within that tradition.