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[UPDATE] CFP: Intermediality/Intermédialité

updated: 
Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 11:48pm
Équinoxes Graduate Conference, Brown University Dept. of French Studies

*Deadline for abstract submissions extended to January 20, 2016*

CALL FOR PAPERS
Intermediality
April 8-9, 2016
Brown University | Providence, Rhode Island
Keynote: Morgane Cadieu
Assistant Professor of French, Yale University

(Un)stable Identities: How the Self is Forged and Found - March 19, 2016

updated: 
Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 8:05pm
English Graduate Student Association, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference: (Un)Stable Identities: How the Self is Forged and Found

"There will be time / to prepare a face to meet the faces that you meet."­ Eliot, Prufrock
"We know what we are, but now what we may be."­ Shakespeare, Hamlet
"I am not an angel...and I will not be one till I die. I will be myself." ­ Bronte, Jane Eyre

Registration now open! CFP: Jan. 20th for this Texas Spring Conference on Medieval/Renaissance Thought

updated: 
Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 2:13pm
Sam Houston State University's Second International Conference on Med/Ren Thought

Attention: All Scholars!!

Don't miss this opportunity to have your work considered to be on the program at this unique Texas conference of medieval and renaissance scholars celebrating beauty!

Send your 250-300 word abstract to Dr. Darci Hill, Conference Director via email to dr.darci.hi@gmail.com. Papers exploring any aspect relating to the medieval and renaissance time period are welcome. Disciplines typically represented at this conference are, art, music, history, philosophy, linguistics, literature, theater, and dance.

Our plenary speaker is Dr. Caroline Bruzelius, art historian from Duke University, whose fascinating research focuses on medieval cathedrals.

The Suburban Sublime - Abstracts by Jan. 30

updated: 
Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 9:19am
Postwar Area Studies Group, American Literature Association, 26-29 May 2016, San Francisco

How did important texts from the postwar period frame the suburbs as a locus of refuge, anger, hysteria, or (even) self-realization at a moment when American cities themselves experienced a shifting and growing economy, African American rights protests, atomic fears, etc.? How did the suburban aesthetic, the collision of romantic and realist, and spatial concepts including place, space, geography, zones, neighborhoods, distance, and scale feature in suburban narrative? We welcome all papers treating the suburban experience, as this approached or averted the apocalyptic, in American texts, 1945-1975.

Fighting Words (Cold War, Korea, Vietnam) - Abstracts by Jan. 30

updated: 
Tuesday, December 29, 2015 - 9:18am
Postwar Area Studies Group, American Literature Association, 26-29 May 2016, San Francisco

How did war terminologies and war mentalities manifest themselves in important texts from the postwar period? Did war narrative change significantly after WWII, in the period 1945 to 1975? Did it go underground, such that we could no longer tell stories about battles, foxholes, and beloved leaders in the way we did in the mid-century? Did Heller's Catch-22 and Vonnegut's Slaughterhouse Five rewrite the rules in significant ways? We welcome all papers treating representations of war in influential American texts, 1945-1975.