'Byron and the Romantic World' Postgraduate Conference at the Old Library, Keele Hall, Keele University. 30th September 2016

full name / name of organization: 
Keele University and Edge Hill University

One of the most celebrated and recognisable figures of
the early nineteenth century, Lord Byron (1788-1824)
stands at the centre of our current debates about
Romanticism and the Romantic world. His life and
poetry has attracted critics, scholars and biographers
interested in issues such as celebrity culture, sexual
politics, the Regency period, the Byronic hero and
Gothicism to name but a few. The amount of recent
scholarly work devoted to editing his works and
correspondence – including digitisation at the Murray
Archive – to exploring his poetic legacy and to
reconsidering his key place in a European Romantic
tradition means there has never been a more exciting
time to be a scholar of Byron and the Romantic world
in which he lived and wrote. This conference aims to
bring together postgraduate researchers working within
Byron Studies and related Romantic contexts, to
reconsider Byron's place within the Romantic world.

We invite papers on any aspect of Byron's life and work
or related Romantic-period writers. Papers are
welcomed from postgraduate students at any level and
undergraduates planning further study. The conference
is an opportunity for students to hone their presenting
and networking skills. Selected papers will be
considered for a special issue of the Keele Humanities
journal Under Construction@ Keele.

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Sir J. Drummond Bone (University of Oxford)

Please send abstracts of up to 250 words to:
byronromanticworld@gmail.com.
The deadline for abstracts is 27th May 2016.
We will notify successful speakers by the end of June.
More information will appear on our ByRom Blog
(byromblog.wordpress.com) shortly.

Organisers:

Julia Coole (Keele University)
Tara Neary (Edge Hill University)

Follow us on Twitter: @byromantics
Facebook: facebook.com/byromantics

In Association with The Byron Journal and the British Association for Romantic Studies (BARS)