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JMMLA Spring 2018 Special Issue: Metonymy, Poetics, Performance

updated: 
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 11:31am
Journal of the Midwest Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 15, 2017

This special issue has a cluster of three terms at its center: metonymy, poetics, and performance. These three terms have to do with conventional structures and what it means to live in them. Metonymy, a trope in which common association lets one thing stand in for another, mobilizes conventional relations. Poetics, the theory of how a text’s elements work together, studies the structures through which artistic effects exist. Performance involves living out relations within structures like genre, medium, and circumstance. Together, these terms allow us to think through the metonymical relations among art, artist, and context.

Submission open for the “Manifestations of male energy in the world cultures” Volume

updated: 
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 11:31am
Centre for Comparative Studies of Civilisations Jagiellonian University in Krakow
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 30, 2017

It is our great honour and pleasure to invite you to submit papers for the forthcoming publication that will be released in English and is scheduled to be published in 2018, in the Jagiellonian University Press series “Bezkresy kultury”. The series is the project of the Centre for Comparative Studies of Civilisations that focuses on various cultures as seen from different perspectives and aims at publishing monographs popularising research deepening our knowledge of the world.
The volume will be a peer reviewed, independent publication discussing the problem of male energy and its manifestations across multiple disciplines, for example:
- Aesthetics
- Literature studies
- Religious studies
- Social studies

Of Tattoos, Piercings, and Other Augmentations: The Modified Body in Literature and Culture (NeMLA18 Panel)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 11:27am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA18)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Over the last few decades, body modification in its many forms and guises has experienced an apparent visibility, appropriation, and revivalism in mainstream media and culture. Spanning centuries of history, body modification can range in intensity and craftsmanship from “normal” (such as earlobe piercings or bodybuilding) to “hardcore” (such as full bodysuit tattoos, surgical modifications, transdermal implants, and even amputations).

Postcolonial Queers: Representations, Remediations, Revolutions (NeMLA18 Panel)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 11:27am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA18)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

The convergence of queer studies with postcolonial theory aims, at its core, to interrogate discourses that created hegemonic and binary categories that in turn became eventual grounds for the historical racialization of sexuality and the sexualization of race. By seeking to destabilize conventions of normalcy, tradition, and power, postcolonial queer studies puts forward non-normative and non-Western conceptions of race, sexuality, and gender that negotiate the spectrum where universalizing neoliberal, White, and predominantly gay love exists on one end; and where the exoticizing, orientalist homogenization of the “Other” exists on the other.

Publish, Don’t Perish: Advice on Writing for Publication (Roundtable)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 11:27am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA18)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Professors have been advised to “publish or perish” for nearly 100 years. First coined in 1927, this phrase warns professors that in order to maintain their jobs, they must publish their work. Publishing has always been central to academia, as it is the primary vehicle through which scholars share their research with a larger audience. Yet, in recent years, academia has changed so that publishing is not reserved for those who are already professors. Instead, publishing has become a requirement for any one who is applying to become a professor, with PhD students being encouraged to publish their research before they have finished their degrees.

From Candidate to Colleague: Navigating the Academic Job Market (Roundtable)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 11:26am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA18)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

The academic job market is famously difficult to navigate. Ironically, the decrease in job opportunities has prompted an increase in the number of materials required by each application—cover letters, CVs, recommendations, dissertation abstracts, research statements, teaching statements, diversity statements—all of which must be customized for each institution to which a candidate is applying. Yet, in spite of these challenges, there are still job openings each year and there are still success stories of people being hired for these positions. While no longer a guarantee, the only way to attain a full-time position in academia is to apply for one.

Chasing Unicorns?: Alternative Career Prospects and Life Outside Academia (Roundtable)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 11:26am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA18)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

It is no secret that over the years, the number of PhD graduates and the number of available permanent academic jobs has been inversely disproportionate. Wendler et al.’s 2010 study revealed that a little under 50% of US PhD graduates found academic jobs, most of which are unlikely to be full-time positions, and majority of which go to graduates of more prestigious universities. Yet these numbers rise dramatically once one looks outside the hallowed walls of the North American university.

Rethinking the University Landscape for Faculty, Graduate Students and Undergraduates (Roundtable)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 11:25am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA18)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Classroom spaces and working environments speak volumes about how institutions conceive of teaching, learning and research, and whether they invest in collaboration. In many ways, institutions remain fixated on the front of the classroom, on the teacher as the “sage on the stage” rather than having faculty experts serve as “guides on the side,” “advanced organizers,” and “resources” for helping students foster their own learning. Individual offices silo faculty from one another, while graduate student and adjunct offices often offer fewer desks than bodies that use them. This long-held standard is changing somewhat, but slowly.

A Culture of Collaboration: Building a Better University (Roundtable)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 11:25am
Northeast MLA (NeMLA 18)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

This session will be an extension of the discussions during the Let's Work Together: Collaboration and Pedagogy roundtables at the 2017 NeMLA Convention in Baltimore. The goals of this session are to further discourse about the ways in which collaboration can be fostered and implemented at the administrative and curricular level, as well as how individual contributors to the university culture—faculty and students of all levels—can incorporate and emphasize collaboration.

ReFocus: The Films of Mary Harron - Additional Call for Chapters

updated: 
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 11:24am
Kyle Barrett/Edinburgh University Press
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, November 30, 2017

ReFocus: The Films of Mary Harron

Edited by Kyle Barrett 

Edinburgh University Press

Series Editors: Gary D. Rhodes and Robert Singer

 

ALTHOUGH THERE HAS BEEN A GREAT RESPONSE TO THE ORIGINAL POST, THERE ARE STILL WORKS AND TOPICS WHICH ARE UNDER-REPRESENTED IN THE VOLUME. THE PUBLICATION WOULD BE PARTICULARLY INTERESTED IN RECEIVING ABSTRACTS AND EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST FOR THE FOLLOWING:

- Exclusive interviews/discussions with Harron or regular collaborators (e.g. Guinevere Turner, Lili Taylor)

International Yeats Society Conference 2017 NYC

updated: 
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 11:23am
International Yeats Society
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, July 30, 2017

 

Second Call for Papers and Panel Proposals for the 2017 International Yeats Society Conference

 

October 20-22, 2017

New York City

Hosted and sponsored by:

The New School University * Fordham University * New York University/Glucksman Ireland House * Williams College

 

The conference includes keynote addresses by Maureen Murphy (Professor Emerita, Hofstra University), and Christopher Cahill (Director, American Irish Historical Society and Director, McCabe Fellowship Exchange Program, John Jay College of Criminal Justice), as well as a reading by the Irish poet Joan McBreen. 

Ethics and Choice in the Works of Terry Pratchett

updated: 
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 11:22am
Emily Leverett and Kristin Noone
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Call For Papers: Ethics and Choice in the Works of Terry Pratchett
Ed. Kristin Noone and Emily Lavin Leverett
(This is for the same volume Kristin sent out before, if you saw that!)

Leadership, Dissent, and Disobedience: Leaders and Followers in a Populist Age

updated: 
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 11:22am
International Studying Leadership Conference
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 31, 2017

Recent populist movements in the U.S., U.K., and around the globe suggest that the practices and theories surrounding dissent and civil disobedience are now more relevant than ever. With the Women’s March reaching nearly five million people world-wide, sparking protests not only across the United States, but in Europe, Asia, Africa, North and South America, Australia, and even Antarctica, it is clear that the praxis of protest will be a hallmark of this period in the twenty-first century.

Geniuses, Addicts, and Scribbling Women: Depicting Writers in Literature & Film (NeMLA 2018)

updated: 
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 11:21am
Cynthia Cravens
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Gendered representations of writers appear in all forms of popular culture, from George Gissing’s Grub Street (1898) and Edith Wharton’s Hudson River Bracketed (1929) to David Duchovney’s character in the Showtime series Californication and Melissa McCarthy’s in CBS’s Mike and Molly. Although they each portray aspects of the writing life that were characteristic of their eras, one thing they have in common (besides the fact that a writer wrote them) is that they all exhibit some kind of peculiarity, be it sex addiction, writer’s block, delusions of grandeur, fevered brilliance, etc., that either adds to or detracts from their writing.

Coils of the Serpent: Journal for the Study of Contemporary Power

updated: 
Monday, June 26, 2017 - 10:32am
University of Leipzig, Germany
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 31, 2017

Call for Papers:

Coils of the Serpent: Journal for the Study of Contemporary Power

 

“The coils of a serpent are even more complex than the burrows of a molehill.”

(Gilles Deleuze, Postscript on the Societies of Control)

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