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Star Trek: Voyager

updated: 
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 1:58pm
Robert L. Lively/ Truckee Meadows Community College
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 28, 2017

In 1995, Star Trek: Voyager launched in a way very different from its predecessor series.  Voyager took place thousands of light years from the Federation, and it contained a multi-ethnic crew with a female captain.  Voyager, in a sense, encapsulated the American zeitgeist of the 1990s when major demographic changes were transforming the population of America, and the post-Cold War era left us wondering what strategic alliances would mean moving forward. The series challenged the nature of the American mindset at the time.

SAMLA 89: Modern Drama (Deadline Extended)

updated: 
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 1:58pm
South Atlantic Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 14, 2017

This session welcomes abstracts on any aspect of Modern Drama. Paper proposals addressing the SAMLA 89 theme, High Art/Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture, are especially welcome. By July 14, please submit a 250-word word abstract, brief bio, and A/V requirements to Aaron Botwick, The Graduate Center, CUNY, at abotwick@gradcenter.cuny.edu

UVA-Wise Medieval/Renaissance, Sept. 21-23, 2017 (Undergrad) (proposals by July 1, 2017)

updated: 
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 1:58pm
University of Virginia's College at Wise
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, July 1, 2017

Medieval-Renaissance Conference XXXI
Undergraduate Sessions
The University of Virginia’s College at Wise
September 21-23, 2017

Keynote Address:  “Historiated Bruts: How Manuscript Illustration Twisted History in the fifteenth-Century English Chronicle”—Elizabeth J. Bryan, Brown University

RSA: Spenser's Pleasures

updated: 
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 1:59pm
Spenser Society
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, May 25, 2017

Spenser's Pleasures: We seek papers on pleasure in Spenser's poetry: erotic, aesthetic, voyeuristic, indecorous, unlikely, limited, unruly, healthy and unhealthy.  Possible frameworks may include the Horatian pairing of instruction and delight, the didactic or anti-didactic value of pleasure, the relation of pleasure to action (as in a Ciceronian commitment to moving, for example), the relation of pleasure to questions of value (variously conceived), as well as pleasure's antitheses—disgust, pain, or loathing.  What is the place of pleasure in attacks on early modern poetry?  In poetry's defense?   We are interested in thinking about Spenser's verse in relation to the history of aesthetics but we are also interested in reversing

RSA: Discontinued Allegory

updated: 
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 1:59pm
Spenser Society
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, May 25, 2017

Discontinued Allegory: Discussions of allegory in The Faerie Queene, beginning with Spenser’s own, emphasize the immense scope of his “dark conceit.” It is a “vast allegory” (Fletcher), a poem that requires “a long memory and a distanced, somewhat relaxed view of its entanglements” (Teskey), and a “continued allegory” (Spenser). This panel invites abstracts for papers that explore Spenser’s interest in smaller, choppier, less enduring allegorical systems throughout his poetry. If an allegory’s scale is determined by its scope, "a long and perpetual metaphor" (Puttenham), what can we learn from allegorical frameworks that are abandoned, overlooked, or even just localized?

EXTENDED DEADLINE TO SUBMIT ABSTRACTS (June 10th)—CFP for ALA panel—Sense of Place in American Modernist Poetry and Visual Art

updated: 
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 2:02pm
American Literature Association
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, June 10, 2017

This panel explores the sense of place as part of the indigenous language of American artistic production of Modernism in the context of the European avant-garde. Though U.S. poets and artists were influenced by the formal techniques of Cubism, Futurism, Expressionism, Dadaism and Surrealism, they were also determined to search for the essence of an expressive language that defined its authenticity as opposed to European foreignness. One of their avenues of research was the exploration of the distinctive features of the American soil as a means of contributing novel aspects to modern aesthetics. The genuine character of the environment is closely linked to the strong attachment to rural or urban spaces and the value they acquire for the observer.

CFP Chapter Proposals on Autoethnography

updated: 
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 1:59pm
Jackie Grutsch McKinney, Ball State University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, July 1, 2017

CALL FOR PROPOSALS: EDITED COLLECTION

Self-Culture-Writing: Autoethnography for/as Writing Studies

EDITORS REBECCA JACKSON & JACKIE GRUTSCH MCKINNEY

 

Literally translated as “self-culture-writing,” autoethnography—as both process and product—

holds great promise for scholars and researchers in Writing Studies who endeavor to describe,

understand, analyze, and critique the ways in which selves, cultures, writing, and representation

intersect. Indeed, interest in autoethnography is growing among Writing Studies folks who see

clear connections to well-known disciplinary conversations about personal narrative (Brandt, et

European Humanism and Its Challenges (Ljubljana, Slovenia, 8–9 September 2017)

updated: 
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 2:00pm
David Movrin / Faculty of Arts, University of Ljubljana
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, May 20, 2017

Dear all, 

Please find below the invitation to the interdisciplinary conference on European Humanism and Its Challenges, organised by Department of Classical Philology, University of Ljubljana; Faculty of Artes Liberales, University of Warsaw; Department of Medieval Studies of the Central European University of Budapest (CEU); Slovenian Comparative Literature Association; Slovenian Book Agency; and Vilenica International Literary Festival. 

Edge Poetics: A Symposium on Innovative and Speculative Creative Writing Practices in Higher Education

updated: 
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 2:02pm
Tim Jarvis / University of Bedfordshire
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 4, 2017

4th November 2017

10.00-17.30, with a public reading at 18.00

Venue: University of Bedfordshire, Luton Campus

With keynotes from Professor Robert Sheppard (Edge Hill University) and Nicholas Royle (Manchester Metropolitan University), and contributions from Dr Helen Marshall (Anglia Ruskin University) and Dr Daniel Watt (Loughborough University)

Dismantling Inequality through Dialogues of Conscience

updated: 
Monday, May 8, 2017 - 2:00pm
Watchung Review
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 30, 2017

Call For Submissions

Dismantling Inequality through Dialogues of Conscience

Humanity, wildlife and the environment have all been negatively impacted by polarizing inequalities. Despite this, courageous individuals and resistance movements have and continue to expose these inequalities and enact change in the face of tremendous opposition. We are interested in submissions that explore gender, racial, sexual, religious, socio-economic and environmental inequalities represented in literature, film as well as other mediums and the changes that have occurred through dialogues inside and outside of the classroom about various forms of inequality.

Topics of interest may include but are not limited to: