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NeMLA 2018: Politics of Preservation: Land, Law and Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 9:25pm
Hande Gurses, UMass Amherst
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 29, 2017

Earlier this year a river revered by the local Mauri people in New Zealand has been granted legal rights as a living entity. This first incident was then succeeded by a court’s decision in India to grant the rivers Ganges and Yamuna the status of living beings. Not all parts of the earth benefit from such legal protection as evidenced by the Gezi Park protests in Istanbul in 2013 and by the Dakota Pipeline protests more recently.

Extended Deadline: Seeking chapters for an edited volume on The Leftovers

updated: 
Monday, August 7, 2017 - 3:10pm
Claire Daigle
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 1, 2017

The editor seeks scholarly essays that address some aspect of HBO’s television series The Leftovers (2014-2017) and/or its source text, Tom Perrotta’s novel of the same title (2011)Perrotta co-produced the series with show runner David Lindelof (Lost). Both novel and series are set three years after the “Sudden Departure” of 2% of the world’s population. In ways distinct to each form, The Leftovers serves as a study of the psychological, social, and cultural impact of a large-scale traumatic event. Perrotta’s spare, satirical, character-driven fiction lies in the lineage of modern novels set in the American suburbs.

Children and Popular Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 9:25pm
Global Studies of Childhood
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 1, 2017

CFP: Global Studies of Childhood

Special Issue: Children and Popular Culture

 

Guest Editor: Patrick Cox, Rutgers University

  

CFP: Afropolitan Literature as World Literature (edited collection, Bloomsbury Publishing)

updated: 
Monday, July 17, 2017 - 4:20am
Bloomsbury Publishing
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Afropolitanism currently inflects many academic and popular conversations about African literature. The term is mobilized to celebrate African influence in the world and to characterize the proliferation of African literature that is disconnected from the daily lives of average people residing on the continent. It refuses victimhood for Africans in the wake of patronizing representations by the likes of CNN, BBC, and KONY 2012 and sells a version of Africa ready-made for western reading tastes.  It represents a formidable ideology formulated by Achille Mbembe, among others, and a way to sell $30 novelty T-shirts to American hipsters.

Nasty Women in Popular Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 - 9:26pm
Dr Alexia L. Bowler/ Swansea University
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, August 1, 2017

 

CFP: Nasty Women in Popular Culture

Editors: Dr Alexia L. Bowler, Dr Adele Jones & Dr Claire O’Callaghan

 

Donald Trump’s now infamous phrase ‘such a nasty woman’, uttered about his then rival Hillary Rodham Clinton in the 2016 U.S. presidential debates, was rudely used to patronise and belittle Clinton, who is known for being a strong, independent (and feminist) politician.

ReFocus: The Films of Spike Jonze

updated: 
Wednesday, June 7, 2017 - 12:30am
Kim Wilkins and Wyatt Moss-Wellington (University of Sydney)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 18, 2017

Spike Jonze is a celebrated director whose deeply philosophical film work crosses boundaries between studio and independent modes of production, genre entertainment and experimentalism. Jonze's oeuvre includes highly regarded feature films (Being John MalkovichAdaptationWhere the Wild Things Are and Her), commercials, music videos and shorts; he is also a prolific producer and actor. Across his work, Jonze investigates the vagaries of contemporary American culture with a particular interest in themes of identity fluidity, loss and grief, American celebrity cultures, storytelling and metacognition, nurturance and development, technology and surveillance, evolution and sociobiology, memory and fantasy.