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DEADLINE EXTENDED, CFP: Postcolonial Economies: Genealogies of Capital and the Colonial Encounter (edited collection)

updated: 
Saturday, December 16, 2017 - 11:18pm
Maureen Fadem (CUNY) and Michael O'Sullivan (Chinese U HK)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 31, 2017

Regarding an ongoing research project at Columbia University, Barnard student Sabrina Singer reflected that when she walks around the campus, now, she wonders: “What else is history going to forget?”[1] The research Singer and her colleagues are doing looks at the historical ties between the institution now educating them and the historical institution of slavery. We were prompted to similar reflections having visited Yale’s Peabody Museum and an exhibit there of Elihu Yale’s gemstones collection. Included in the display is a painting of Yale: he is pictured with a large unfinished diamond ring symbolizing Britain’s dominance over India.

College English Association 2018 Conference

updated: 
Monday, October 30, 2017 - 3:14pm
Carolyn Kyler / College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, November 1, 2017

CEA 49th Annual Conference

“Bridges”

April 5-April 7, 2018 | Hilton St. Petersburg Bayfront

333 1st St South, Saint Petersburg, Florida  33701 | Phone: (727) 894-5000

The Sunshine Skyway Bridge crosses Tampa Bay from St. Petersburg, called the Sunshine City in honor of its Guinness Record for most consecutive days of sunshine (768). St. Petersburg is home to historic neighborhoods, distinguished museums, contemporary galleries, and a wide variety of dining, entertainment and shopping venues.

Berkeley Germanic Linguistics Roundtable

updated: 
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 10:18pm
Irmengard Rauch
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Berkeley Germanic Linguistics Roundtable

Friday/Saturday, April 6-7 2018

The Faculty Club

University of California, Berkeley

 

Invited Speakers:

Tonya Dewey-Findell, University of Nottingham

Angelika Lutz, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg

John McWhorter, Columbia University

Theo Vennemann, University of Munich

 

Scholars (faculty and students) interested in Germanic Linguistics, its near and/or distant related languages, diverse approaches, synchrony and/or diachrony, historical and/or contemporary language are invited to submit a one-page abstract of a twenty minute paper by January 31, 2018  to the conference organizer:

(EXTENDED DEADLINE) Vol 7, No 1 (2018): "Muddied Waters: Decomposing the Anthropocene"

updated: 
Friday, October 6, 2017 - 3:26pm
Pivot: A Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies and Thought
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, November 3, 2017

EXTENDED DEADLINE! (November 3, 2017)

Pivot: A Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies & Thought

CALL FOR PAPERS: Vol 7, No 1 (2018): “Muddied Waters: Decomposing the Anthropocene”

“Progress means: humanity emerges from its spellbound state no longer under the spell of progress as well, itself nature, by becoming aware of its own indigenousness to nature and by halting the mastery over nature through which nature continues its mastery.” — Theodor Adorno, “Progress” (p. 62)

“This future is unthinkable. Yet here we are, thinking it.” — Timothy Morton, Dark Ecology (p. 1)

The Subject of Women in Proust (NeMLA 2018)

updated: 
Wednesday, August 30, 2017 - 10:46pm
Northeast Modern Language Association 49th Annual Conference in Pittsburgh, PA April 12-15, 2018
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 25, 2017

The Subject of Women in Proust

 

On first reading, Proust's narrative in A la Recherche du temps perdu suggests that women are merely objects in Marcel's development. Despite extensive descriptions and metaphors, female characters seem to slip away from concrete definition, defying assured characterization. Moreover, most critical discussions of women in Proust compartmentalize female characters either as “Madonnas” (Marcel’s mother and grandmother) or “whores” (Odette, Gilberte, Albertine, Léa, Rachel). But how are women in Proust's fiction more than just objects? Given their centrality to the text, a reexamination of the ways in which Proust writes female characters is overdue.

Theatre, Performance, and Slavery

updated: 
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 10:18pm
American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 15, 2018

Please consider submitting proposals for the 2018 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies panel on "Theatre, Performance, and Slavery." This panel is sponsored by the ASECS Performance Studies Caucus; we are interested in work by scholars from a variety of national-linguistic traditions (French, Spanish, English, Portuguese, Dutch), as well as comparatists. ASECS 2018 will take place in Orlando, Florida, from March 22-25; deadline for receipt of proposals is September 15.

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CFP: Theatre, Performance, and Slavery

 

The Contemporary Women's Writing Essay Prize

updated: 
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 10:18pm
Contemporary Women's Writing
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, February 1, 2018

The Contemporary Women’s Writing Essay Prize aims to encourage new scholarship in the field of contemporary women’s writing, recognise and reward outstanding achievement by new researchers and support the professional development of next generation scholars.

The prize is open to anyone currently registered for a PhD, or anyone who has completed one within three years of the submission deadline. The winner will receive:

Special issue on Adaptations and History

updated: 
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - 10:19pm
Adaptation
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 1, 2017

Submissions are invited for a special issue of Adaptation; ‘Adaptations and History’.

These might include:

S. T. Coleridge's Biographia Literaria: 200th Anniversary

updated: 
Thursday, November 9, 2017 - 12:43pm
The Anachronist
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, February 20, 2018

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

The New Series of The Anachronist

invites academic papers for its 2017 issue (to be published in 2018),

celebrating the 200th anniversary of the publication of

 

S. T. Coleridge’s

Biographia Literaria