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'Tropical Gothic'

updated: 
Monday, July 2, 2018 - 9:32am
eTropic journal
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 30, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS special issue ‘Tropical Gothic’

 

Submission Deadline: 30 December 2018

 

‘TROPICAL GOTHIC’

‘The Gothic’ is undergoing a resurgence in academic and popular cultures. Propelled by fears produced by globalization, the neoliberal order, networked technologies, post-truth and environmental uncertainty – tropes of ‘the gothic’ resonate. The gothic allows us to delve into the unknown. It calls up unspoken truths and secret desires.

Reading Reality through Science Fiction

updated: 
Monday, July 2, 2018 - 9:33am
University Stefan cel Mare of Suceava, 13 University Street, 720229 Suceava, Romania
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, June 1, 2019

Reading Reality through Science Fiction

The academic journal Messages, Sages and Ages (http://www.msa.usv.ro/), based at the English Department, University of Suceava, Romania, invites contributions for an issue on “science fiction as reality-check”; the theme issue is guest edited by Roberto Paura (University of Perugia, Italy).

Cinema, Cognition and Art

updated: 
Monday, July 2, 2018 - 9:36am
Babeș-Bolyai University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 1, 2018

Call for papers Ekphrasis. Images, Cinema, Theory, Media. Vol. 19, Issue 2/2018

Ekphrasis is a peer-reviewed academic journal, edited by the Faculty of Theatre and Television, “Babes-Bolyai” University, Cluj-Napoca, Romania, indexed by Clarivate Analytics Emerging Sources Citation Index, ERIH +, EBSCO, CEEOL

For more information and submission guidelines, please visit: http://ekphrasisjournal.ro

 

Cinema, Cognition and Art

Tourists, Tourism, and Transnationality in the Victorian Cultural Imagination

updated: 
Monday, July 2, 2018 - 9:37am
Joellen Masters/Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Travel, travel writing, and the rise of mass tourism in the nineteenth century have received an impressively wide scholarly focus. In informing the willing sightseer, guidebooks like Baedeker’s or Murray’s constructed a particular approach to the foreign and the unknown. Obligatory rather than spontaneous, requisite rather than discretionary, the experience guidebooks delineated and that powerful tourist agencies like Thomas Cook regulated, produced an intrepid British traveler whose thirst for the new and the exotic challenged conventional notions of relaxation and knowledge, while, at the same time, remained a carefully governed cosmopolitan identity.

Joseph Conrad and the Uses of Influence

updated: 
Monday, July 2, 2018 - 9:37am
M. Nezam-Mafi/ Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Even among the modernists with whom he is frequently grouped, Joseph Conrad, the Polish-born former mariner who, in his third language, reinvented himself as a British novelist, is a singularly resonant and deeply fraught figure.  Conrad’s biography and work anticipate both the figure and the preoccupations of the transnational and transcultural artist.  In a 1906 letter, Henry James wrote to Conrad, “No one has known – for intellectual use – the things you know.”  How Conrad rendered what he “knew” is critical to literary developments of the last century.  Much of the scholarship on Conrad, however, has focused on his impressionism or, more controversially, on his view of imperialism.  Was he, in his partial sympathy for subjugated people, and his attack

NeMLA 2019-Intersecting Classes, Races, and Women in American Literature

updated: 
Monday, July 2, 2018 - 9:37am
Hediye Ozkan
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

In her groundbreaking book titled Women in the Nineteenth Century, Margaret Fuller suggests a remedy for the degradation of work for women stating, “Women are the best helpers of one another” (117). Fuller’s statement has reflections in many works written at the end of the nineteenth century such as Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, The Silent Partner (1871),  Alcott’s Work (18739, and Blake’s Fettered for Life (1874) all of which focus on sisterhood, solidarity, and feminine bond among women across class, race, and nationality as a survival mechanism within capitalist economy.

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