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CFP: Multilingual Poetry Today: Sound, Sense and Self in Motion

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:51pm
NeMLA Convention, Washington DC, March 21-24, 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

“A nomadic poetics will cross languages,” states Pierre Joris, “not just translate, but write in all or any of them.” His foreshadowing of contemporary trends brings us to consider the stakes of multilingual fluency in works by Anne Tardos, Uljana Wolf, Jérôme Game, and Erin Mouré, among others. If the Modernists commonly tied multilingualism to erudite allusions, what forms do polyglot poets today use to restore cultural specificity? How do multilingual practices reframe figures of the foreign(er) and translatability? What reading communities do such works engender? Can multilingual poetry published in Anglophone countries resist becoming a trope of global culture?

Transnational Exchange and the Early Modern World (NeMLA 2019)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:46pm
Victor Sierra Matute
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

How material exchange and mobility affect people and their ideas? How do these subjects and these objects transform the place of destination and its practices, knowledge, texts, and understanding of the world? This panel will address the consequences of the mobility of subjects and the exchange of objects in the early modern world. Early modernity is a time strongly characterized by the increasing crossing of boundaries. In this sense, this panel wants to analyze how material exchange enables different cultures to cross borders and permeate different social spaces, modifying those who import them and those who export them.

Moving through Memory and Space

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:31pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This panel seeks to explore representations of transnational space and transcultural memory in literature of French expression. Whether through exile, immigration, travel, migritudeerrance, or the meanderings of the flâneur/flâneuse, francophones have traversed a wide global terrain. Just as authors integrate place into their creations, they in turn leave their stamp on the memories and associations that accrue to any geographical location. Cultural production then reflects and inflects shifting identitarian configurations.

Adolescence in Film and Television (April 17-20, 2019; Proposals due October 1, 2018)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:46pm
Kylo-Patrick R. Hart, Area Chair, Popular Culture Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 1, 2018

The Adolescence in Film and Television Area invites paper proposals for presentation at the annual Popular Culture Association Conference, to be held April 17-20, 2019 in Washington, D.C. The official deadline for online submission of presentation abstracts (see below for additional information) is October 1, 2018.

Submissions that explore noteworthy coverage patterns, representations, and themes pertaining to the portrayal of adolescence/adolescents in film and television, during any historical era, are desired from scholars, educators, and students at all levels. 

Graduate Journal aspeers Calls for Papers on "American Anger" by 28 Oct 2018

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:44pm
aspeers: emerging voices in american studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, October 28, 2018

"If you're not angry, you're not paying attention"—according to an Esquire/NBC News survey from 2016, "[h]alf of all Americans are angrier today than they were a year ago." Statements like this mirror a perceived cultural and societal change that transcends simplistic partisan divides and has been accompanied by political battles and heated discourse. Though there has been an increased focus on anger in American public life following the 2016 election season, the mobilization of anger has a history that reaches back much further than current debates might suggest.

Race and Versification in Anglophone Poetry

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:51pm
NeMLA (March 21-24, 2019; Washington D.C.)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Race and Versification in Anglophone Poetry

Studies of versification tend to be silent on race, and with some exceptions (such as Anthony Reed’s 2014 Freedom Time), studies of race and poetic form tend to turn away from the mechanics of versification. As Dorothy Wang argues in Thinking its Presence: Race and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry (2014), most accounts of poetic form revolve around the technical accomplishments of white poets, while minority figures are seen as more valuable for their poetry’s social or thematic content. What would happen if nonwhite poets were read for their proficiency with poetic forms, and were made the center of conversations about poetic technique? 

Poetry, Pedagogy, and Public Engagement (NeMLA 2019 Roundtable)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:22pm
Nate Mickelson
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Public humanities scholar Doris Sommer argues that “learning to think like an artist and an interpreter is basic training for our volatile times.” She encourages teachers to involve students and community members in artistic practices—writing poems, performing skits, sharing music—in order to build critical literacy skills. Like many poets, poet-critics, and poet-teachers, Sommer describes aesthetic engagement as a way to produce critical insights and cultivate political community. According to this view, poetry invites or occasions experiences that alter readers’ perspectives. What we experience as we interpret a poem changes the way we interpret elements of everyday life. And these altered or enhanced perspectives open up new political possibilities.

Roundtable: Phenomenology and Poetics

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:53pm
NEMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This roundtable will evaluate the relevance of the philosophical field of phenomenology—the rigorous study of the structures of consciousness and bodily experience—to twentieth and twenty-first century American poetry through a series of short paper presentations. “[W]ords … are,” Maurice Merleau-Ponty argues in Phenomenology of Perception, “ways of singing the world, and … they are destined to represent objects, not through an objective resemblance … but because they are extracted from them, and literally represent their emotional essence” (193).