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[SCMS 2019] Up to and Including Its Limits: Rethinking Experimental Cinema(s)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:27pm
Swagato Chakravorty / Yale University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, August 25, 2018

This panel invites new positions from which to conceptualize postwar moving-image art, extending into the contemporary moment. Anglo-American and European scholarship on moving-image art through the 1960s and 70s has largely privileged formalist thinking. There is, as Jonathan Walley has written, a “general agreement…that avant-garde filmmakers of this period followed the trend within modernist art toward medium-specific purification: the reduction of the art object to the essential physical or material components of its medium.”[1] In recent years, however, we have witnessed a number of crucial revisionist interventions.

Generating Debate in the Early American Literature Classroom

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:06pm
Hugh Egan (Ithaca College)/ NeMLA 2019
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

What issues currently generate debate among our students as they read classic American texts from the pre-Civil War era? Racism in Rowlandson and Jefferson? Toxic economic self-interest in Franklin? Paternalism in Emerson and Thoreau? This pedagogical roundtable will be devoted to a discussion of how we keep the 21st century student engaged with American texts from the 17th, 18th, and early 19th centuries. I am especially interested in the balance (if that is the right word) we strike between encouraging aesthetic appreciation of a work while simultaneously inviting sharp cultural/historical critique.

Complications of Eating: Investigating (In)digestion in Literature and Film

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 1:03pm
Niki Kiviat
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 5, 2018

As recent literary and cultural critics have shown, food, and its presence in literature and film, is not solely linked to corporeal survival. The relationship between food and the body is also one of chemical and physical processes, and of tolerance and rejection (both individual and societal). Food—eating, preparation, choice—therefore also embodies social and cultural nuances and, in their evolution, processes of change. What is more, in the acts of consumption and digestion, food can re-emerge in various, and often socially taboo, ways and, in so doing, highlight sociocultural boundaries and normativities. In other words, food not only reflects on individual biological needs, but it also exposes larger social ontologies.

Women Writing Crime

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:27pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Women’s interest in crime, and violent crime in particular, has become increasingly apparent in recent years. Women now read more crime fiction and thrillers than men, are the primary audience for a number of popular true-crime podcasts (listeners of My Favorite Murder even refer to themselves as “Murderinos”), and increasingly enter fields of study that put them in close contact with the after-effects of violent crime, making up approximately 75% of current forensic science graduates.

Nemla 2019 Seminar "Queer Women: Reading and Writing in 19th & 20th Peninsular Spanish Literature"

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:28pm
Ana Isabel Simón-Alegre / Adelphi University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

The topic of this seminar is the presence of the “chicas raras” in Modern Spanish literature, also known as “queer women” in English. Queer is the perfect conceptual framework to think about how Spanish authors explore feminist themes, such as discrimination or inequality using their narratives as a tool to examine tensions in female subjectivity. The concept queer includes the idea of gender dissidence that encompasses how female intellectuals experience sex, sexuality and, gender. Even if oftentimes these writers have difficulties conceptualizing these notions, they are perceptible in women narratives, especially through specific genres: autobiography, memoir, romance fiction and letters.

Call for Abstracts for NEMLA Roundtable: Gothic Television

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:28pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

2019 Convention: March 21-24, Washington DC

Roundtable: GOTHIC TELEVISION (Session 17503, Aoise Stratford, Cornell University)

 

Moral Grammar in Nietzsche

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:14pm
Anthony Kosar / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

In On the Genealogy of Morals Friedrich Nietzsche writes critically of just how bound his own native German was to more widespread religious-moral beliefs, such as those which take a fixed moral subject as the beginning and end of all we can know, thereby leaving out one’s own doing as secondary to who one is. Nietzsche writes: “But there is no ‘being’ behind doing[…] – doing is everything” (GM I, 13) and thus suggests that the underlying grammar of the languages he himself knew well – all of which acknowledge if only implicitly an objective difference between subject and verb, doer and deed – were in fact wrong and had to be thought through from the ground up. One might yet take Nietzsche to task on this provocation.

CFP for NeMLA 2019: Viscerality in the 20th Century

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:04pm
NeMLA March 21-24th, 2019 Washington, D.C
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

We are seeking submissions for our accepted panel, entitled "Viscerality in the 20th Century," at the Notheastern Modern Language Association (NeMLA) Conference to be held on March 21-24th, 2019 in Washington D.C.

Call for Special Issue Proposals (Open Topic)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 3, 2019 - 3:06pm
English Language Notes
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 15, 2018

Call for Special Issue Proposals (Open Topic)

English Language Notes

Urban Space and Cityscapes: Italian perspectives in fiction, photography, and film.

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 2:56pm
Letizia Modena, Vanderbilt University
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

Dear Colleagues,

Please consider submitting a proposal to the following session for the NeMLA 2019 Convention in Washington, DC (March 21-24).

 Urban Space and Cityscapes: Italian perspectives in fiction, photography, and film.

NeMLA 2019 Panel: How Can Adjuncts, Graduate Students, and Tenured Professors Better Fight for the University We Want?

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:00pm
Michael Druffel / CUNY Graduate Center
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

This panel, part of the NeMLA 2019 conference in Washington, DC from March 21-24, 2019, aims to bring together adjuncts, graduate students, and tenured professors to discuss how we can all work together to fight for a more democratic and just work environment. Topics might include ways to build solidarity to improve working conditions, more democratic ways to share power and responsibility between adjuncts, graduate students, and tenured professors, and ways to increase diversity in the university. Other topics that address solidarity between all workers in the university are welcome.

NeMLA 2019 panel: The Use of Audacity and Candor in Women's Literature (Panel)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 1:01pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

“Audacity” is having a moment in the women’s movement. Festivals, conferences and training sessions have used the term as shorthand for women speaking their truth and owning the power to direct the outcomes of their lives. (The Audacious Women Festival in Scotland and the Audacious Women’s Network in South Africa are two examples.)

Yet audacity is not new. Throughout history, outspoken women writers of fiction, poetry, and plays have positioned themselves in the vanguard of audacity, defying public censure and personal isolation to write candidly about their world. Transgression is a disruptor of patriarchal norms. Candor is transformational when it is deployed to pose questions, shatter stereotypes, and incite change.

Langland's Library (IPPS 2019)

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 3:06pm
Ann E. Killian, Yale University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 7, 2018

Paper Panel: “Langland’s Library”

NEMLA 2019: Decolonial Approaches to Literature, Film and Visual Arts

updated: 
Monday, August 13, 2018 - 12:39pm
Badreddine Ben Othman and Danielle Schwartz (Binghamton University SUNY)
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 30, 2018

According to Walter Mignolo (2013, 2007), the triumphal narrative of modernity is inseparable from coloniality, or the logic of domination, exploitation, and oppression. While modernity builds itself on a triumphal narrative of civilization, progress, and development, modernity hides its darker side, “coloniality.” “Modernity/coloniality” shows that while modernity materializes in the rhetoric of salvation, modernity, capitalism, and coloniality are inseparable aspects yoked to authority and the control of economy. The first conceptualizations of modernity/coloniality/decoloniality, launched by Quijano (2007), focus on economic-political dimensions and the question of knowledge and racism.

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