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displaying 46 - 60 of 202

Mis-/Well-behaved Women: Setting and Subverting Social Standards (NeMLA 2020)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 11:53am
Laura Biesiadecki / Temple University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Setting social guidelines for women in various circles and economic classes has been common practice for centuries: as early as the 13th century and most popular in the 18th, conduct books established standards for righteous noble/rich women of marrying age, and gave their readers guides by which to weed out the spiritually and socially (and financially) destitute. Written by both men and women, these texts encouraged readers to practice a demure nature and tasteful displays of wealth in the interest of attracting potential suitors and keeping themselves in the circles of “important” friends, but these standards were frequently subverted in...rather creative ways.

Minima Moralia Today: A Symposium

updated: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 11:57am
Mandel Center for the Humanities Brandeis University Waltham, MA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 20, 2019

Call for Papers:Minima Moralia Today:  A Symposium

 

September 20, 2019

 

Mandel Center for the Humanities

Brandeis University

Waltham, MA

 

Invited speakers:  S.D. Chrostowska (York University), Andrea Dara Cooper (University of North Carolina), Jakob Norberg (Duke University)

 

International Journal of James Bond Studies 3(1)

updated: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 9:19am
International Journal of James Bond Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 1, 2019

The International Journal of James Bond Studies is now accepting submissions for Volume 3.

Modernist Short Stories Writers

updated: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 10:12am
Kay Boyle Society
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, June 13, 2019

Modernist Short Stories Writers

Sponsored by the Kay Boyle Society

The American Short Story: New Considerations

New Orleans, Sep. 5-7, 2019

 

Many modernist writers experimented with the short story genre early in their careers, while reading, publishing and critiquing each other’s work in small magazines.

The objective of this panel is to engage in comparative, reflective conversation, bringing out as yet unnoticed similarities and convergence in themes, writing practices, and subjectivities among these writers.

This panel invites papers on the work of one writer or in the context of other writers, on one or more of the following themes:

More than Meets the Ear - Sound & Short Fiction

updated: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 11:58am
University of Vienna (Austria)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, June 15, 2019

Sound is being celebrated as a source of insight in the humanities. Foregrounding the sense condemned to play second fiddle by Plato, scholars are tapping into sonic, auditive and aural phenomena and their technological reproduction, mapping practices of sound production, exploring soundscapes of different periods, compiling cultures and histories of hearing and listening. Some publications in this vibrant field focus on voice/s, others explore the theorisation, representation and political (re-) evaluation of noise/s or investigate how hearing may interact with vision, touch, taste and smell.

NeMLA 2020 CFP: Creating Humanity through Prison Education Programs

updated: 
Monday, September 16, 2019 - 9:55pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Colleges and universities have witnessed great shifts in student populations over the last few decades, including new populations of veteran  and adult students. Now, as the traditional aged student continues to decline in numbers, one additional population of potential students appears to continue to grow: prison inmate students. College prison programs include both credit programs and enrichment programs. Through programs such as Shakespeare Behind Bars, the recidivism rates have declined as the men and women in these programs discover empathy, a love of language, and the value of community. This panel will explore college prison programs.

Lady Problems: 21st Century Women and Comedy

updated: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 12:01pm
Sara Hosey/Northeastern Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In 2011, responding to a few famous men’s remarks that “women aren’t funny,” Tina Fey wrote, “It is an impressively arrogant move to conclude that just because you don't like something, it is empirically not good. I don't like Chinese food, but I don't write articles trying to prove it doesn't exist.”

In recent years, it has only become more difficult to argue the nonexistence, irrelevance, or inferiority of women’s comedy. This panel will explore the explosion in women’s comedy, including in novels, memoirs, stand-up, television series, and political commentary.

Ecosomatics Symposium

updated: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 1:52pm
Catherine Fairfield & Petra Kuppers
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 1, 2019

Call for Symposium Proposals: Ecosomatics

 

We are inviting contributions to a three-day residential symposium at the Pierce Cedar Creek Institute in Michigan (April 23rd to 25th2020), funded and supported by the University of Michigan (Departments of English, Dance, Theatre, National Center for Institutional Diversity, Initiative on Disability Studies, Graham Sustainability Institute and the Program in the Environment) in collaboration with the Black Earth Institute.

 

NeMLA 2020 - Call for papers: Trans Identities in the French media

updated: 
Saturday, September 7, 2019 - 3:51pm
NeMLA 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

“Transsexualité, transidentité: un tabou français?” (“Transsexuality, transidentity: a French taboo?[1]). Such was the title chosen by the online French news magazine France Infoto illustrate an article published in 2015[2]that discussed the lack of visibility transsexuals and transgender people still suffer from in French society.

*DEADLINE EXTENDED* NeMLA 2020: Suspicion Today

updated: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019 - 1:26pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 7, 2019

In the wake of the recent Postcritical Turn in literary studies, a pall has been cast over suspicious modes of analysis. Eve Sedgwick famously sought to move away from the paranoid imperative towards a more reparative relation; Sharon Best and Stephen Marcus have proposed surface reading as an antidote to symptomatic methodology; and, more recent still, Rita Felski has underscored the banality of suspicious hermeneutics as a central premise in her circumscription of the limits of critique.

Puppet Theatre: In the Beginning were Puppets An Interdisciplinary Conference held at Salzburg University in Collaboration with the Salzburg Marionette Theatre 30-31 January 2020

updated: 
Wednesday, May 29, 2019 - 1:54pm
Salzburg University in Collaboration with the Salzburg Marionette Theatre
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 15, 2019

Puppets are a universal phenomenon that appears in all cultures. Varying in size from the miniscule to the
colossal, puppetry is of an enormous diversity: from rounded (the string puppet or the marionette, the
rod-puppet, the hand- or glove-puppet, the finger-puppet) to flat (the shadow-show, the toy or paper
theatre); from 'living' marionettes and bodies fastened to performers, to 'held' puppets (Japanese Bunraku
theatre), puppets come in all shapes and sizes. Performances involving puppets are no less variegated:
spanning art forms as diverse as folk theatre and élite entertainment, one only needs to recall eighteenthcentury
operas penned for puppets; Gordon Craig's non-naturalistic refashioning of the actor as a

Futures for English

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:17am
English in Australia
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, July 15, 2019

English has always been subject to a number of competing agendas, with the result that its purpose within the school curriculum has often been open to contention. From its inception, English has been seen by governments and employers as the subject that teaches literacy and prepares students for the work force. By contrast, other advocates of English have argued its importance in cultivating character and citizenship in students. Yet others have argued the importance of the role that English plays in stimulating the growth of the imagination and enabling students to appreciate the value of literary language.

Comparative Women

updated: 
Wednesday, June 5, 2019 - 10:16am
Louisiana State University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, June 15, 2019

Comparative Woman: Kin

Comparative Woman’s 2019 issue is looking for academic essays, poetry, art, interviews, and book reviews on our theme of “Kin.”

 

Theme: What is “kinship”? Is it merely biological or is it something that we choose? What are the bonds that we form? How do we form them? Why do we need these bonds? Why do these bonds matter? From Moms to Drag Mothers, covens to close-knit communities and cults, and siblings to fraternities: how do we recognize and establish “kin”?

 

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