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"Tales from the Grand Trunk Road" Panel

updated: 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 1:45pm
51st Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Convention/Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

The oldest highway in Southern Asia was named the Grand Trunk Road by the British in the 17thcentury. During the nineteenth century the route carried not just goods for trade, but also British travelers whose numbers increased on the subcontinent as the century progressed. While the Grand Trunk Road was mentioned in Rudyard Kipling’s novel, Kim, many travelers may not have specifically mentioned it in their accounts, but their journeys would have inevitably taken them through such recognizable places on the route like, Calcutta, Delhi, Lahore, and Kabul. 

Call for podcast contributors: Books Aren't Dead

updated: 
Tuesday, June 11, 2019 - 12:47pm
Books Aren't Dead Podcast
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, December 1, 2019

 

 

The co-producers of Books Aren’t Dead, a podcast with authors of books and games that deal with the intersection of feminism, new technology, new media and digital spaces, is looking for contributors/collaborators. Books Aren’t Dead is affiliated with the Fembot Collective and the peer-reviewed journal Ada.  

 

After the Welfare State: Reconceiving Mutual Aid

updated: 
Monday, June 10, 2019 - 12:14pm
The Telos-Paul Piccone Institute
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

The 2020 Annual Telos-Paul Piccone Institute Conference
February 15–16, 2020
Deutsches Haus at New York University
New York, NY

After the Welfare State: Reconceiving Mutual Aid

Keynote Speaker: Catherine Malabou, Kingston University and University of California, Irvine.

 

Conference Description

Feeling (Un)American: Race and National Belonging in the African American Literary Tradition

updated: 
Thursday, August 8, 2019 - 12:00pm
North East Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

In his 1903 The Souls of Black Folk, W.E.B. Du Bois poses a question at the heart of the African-American literary tradition: “How does it feel to be a problem?” We see the question’s precursors in Walker’s Appeal, Douglass’ address on the Fourth of July, and Harper’s anti-slavery poetry. It reverberates in Hurston’s “How It Feels To Be Colored Me,” Ellison’s “black and blue,” Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, and Rankine’s Citizen. Taking up the affective relationship between race and national belonging, these texts ask us to contend with what it feels like to be black in a nation founded on anti-blackness. Indeed, as Baldwin and Coates make clear, the problem lies ever “between the world and me.”

 

Teaching South Asia outside the English Department

updated: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 1:36pm
South Asian Literary Association (SALA) Conference, Seattle, WA 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, July 31, 2019

How does pedagogical strategizing work in teaching Global South Asian literatures in majority serving institutions located in areas where the student body is mostly white, or lacking in South Asian immigrant groups? How does South Asian literature find a place in general education core courses? What are some current practices and challenges that scholars of color specializing in and including South Asia as a text, experience in their classrooms? We are interested in sharing experiences on teaching, planning courses, writing curriculum development projects including South Asia centric courses both for the major and the general education classes that embrace the inclusion of literatures from the global South, especially from South Asia.

Rethinking Peer Review: Theory and Practice

updated: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 1:36pm
Northeastern Modern Language Association Conference, 2020
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This call is for roundtable proposals for NEMLA's 2020 conference taking place in Boston.

Thirty Years Since The Fall of Communism: Visual Narratives, Memory and Culture

updated: 
Tuesday, July 30, 2019 - 6:14am
Faculty of History, Philosophy and Theology, the Faculty of Letters, and the Cross-border Faculty of “Dunărea de Jos” University of Galati
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 25, 2019

 

http://fift.ugal.ro/30years/

A joint project of the Faculty of History, Philosophy and Theology, the Faculty of Letters, and the Cross-border Faculty of “Dunărea de Jos” University of Galati, the conference is intended as a cultural forum for imparting knowledge and research on the textuality and representation of recent, lived history, from different yet interrelated angles:

NeMLA 2020: New Materialist Readings of 19th-century Writers

updated: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 10:08am
Dewey W. Hall, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This session engages in a matter-oriented approach, raising questions about the ontological status of the autonomous writing subject by joining it to the vast network of relations to objects within an area—ecozone, bioregion, biome, or ecosystem. Though the contributions by science-based writers are important (e.g., Humphry Davy, Michael Faraday, George Perkins Marsh, John Muir, etc.) New Materialist Interpretations of 19th-century Writers focuses on a different trajectory, accentuating less detectable and unacknowledged contributions to natural history writing offered by literary writers.

EXTENDED DEADLINE UPDATED: Pedagogical Approaches to Creating Safer Spaces in the Classroom

updated: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019 - 2:38pm
Lindsay Bryde / Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, October 7, 2019

One of the biggest challenges for LGBTQiA students is the fact that there’s a constant question about regarding their need to “come out” and how to determine who is “safe” (a term with many definitions) to do that with on college campuses today. This panel will look at pedagogy approaches to fostering an inclusive environment and what to do when a student needs guidance and services due to their orientation. Participants are encouraged to present pedagogy methods for educating audiences (questioning, out, ally, and general) and fostering safer spaces. Papers can address approaches/lesson plans in the classroom, as well as resources for instructors in their service activities to the campus.  

The Marvel Cinematic Universe: Examining a Post-Endgame World

updated: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 9:46am
Lindsay Bryde / Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

This roundtable will be looking holistically at perspectives on the first 22 films in the MCU. This arc will be brought to completion with Avenger’s Endgame. Now would be a good time to look back and assess which gambles have worked and/or failed now that a narrative arc has been completed. Participants are encouraged to consider the MCU both as a whole as well as specific franchises under the overall banner.  

The conference is through the Northeast Modern Language Association and will take place March 5-8th, 2020 in Boston, MA

Submissions are due: September 30, 2019

Consumption and the Literary Cookbook

updated: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 10:20am
Roxanne Harde / University of Alberta
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 5, 2019

In the 1960s, long before there was Julie & Julia, an aspiring writer named Nora Ephron cooked her way through the holy trinity of cookbooks: Julia Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Michael Field’s Cooking School, and Craig Claiborne’s New York Times Cook Book. In a New Yorker column from 2006, titled “Serial Monogamy: My Cookbook Crushes,” Ephron describes her relationship with the authors of these books: “as I cooked, I had imaginary conversation with them both [Claiborne fell out of favor early on]. Julia was nicer and more forgiving. … Field was sterner and more meticulous; he was almost fascistic.

Special Issue of Canadian Review of American Studies on "New Television"

updated: 
Friday, June 7, 2019 - 10:20am
Canadian Review of American Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 1, 2019

There is a gathering consensus that television began to undergo a marked transformation at the end of the twentieth century. Two decades into the twenty-first century, an ever-increasing number of cable and streaming series imaginatively conjure the emergence of a world liquidated of normative authority, saturated with media-technological developments, and struggling to find its bearings in the fray. In New Television: The Aesthetics and Politics of a Genre, Martin Shuster refers to this still-unfolding genre as “new television” on account of both its relatively new narrative coordinates and its efforts to think through the bewildering contours of a rapidly changing world.

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