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Fandom: The Next Generation (edited collection)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 30, 2019 - 4:12pm
Bridget Kies
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Fandom: The Next Generation
Transgenerational Fans and Long-Running Media Franchises

CFP for contributions to edited collection

Imagine taking your child to see The Last Jedi after your own parents took you to see Return of the Jedi when you were small. Picture a grandmother, mother, and daughter sitting down to watch reruns of The Golden Girls together. What keeps fans interested in after so many years? How do long-running franchises, revivals, and reboots appeal to new audiences? How do social and political changes affect longtime fan experiences? This book sets out to explore a relatively unstudied aspect of fan and audience studies: longtime fans and generational turnover.

MSA 2020: Southern Modernist Women Writers and the Topographies of the Street

updated: 
Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 11:43am
Carson McCullers Society
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, January 5, 2020

The Carson McCullers Society is soliciting abstracts for a two-part roundtable series on southern modernist women writers and the topographies of the street for the Modernist Studies Association (MSA) conference in Brooklyn, NY, on October 22-25, 2020. This two-part series goes with the MSA conference theme of "the street" and is intended to spark conversation and collaboration among Welty, O'Connor, McCullers, Porter, Petrie, Chopin, and Hurston scholars, among others, about the innovations and interventions of southern modernist women writers in creating street scenes, situations, and characters.

Mad Scholars Anthology

updated: 
Saturday, August 17, 2019 - 5:39pm
Mad Scholar Collective
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 30, 2019

Recently, there has been an avalanche of news articles about spikes in mental illness on campus. Seminal works like Margaret Price's Mad at School (2011) have begun to expose the ableism inherent in the university and prompted more open discussion surrounding the politics of disclosure.

As interest in this crucial topic grows, we are seeking out academics with psychiatric disorders and disabilities to contribute chapters to an essay collection on Mad Scholars, showcasing personal perspectives and professional experiences from across disciplines and career stages.

Call for Chapters - Collected Essays on Teaching African American Texts by White Faculty

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:44pm
Cheryl Boots / Boston University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 16, 2019

Following up the 2019 NeMLA Roundtable “White Allies/Co-conspirators:Teaching African American Literature,” Lexington Books has expressed interest in publishing a collection of essays about white faculty teaching texts by persons of color.

African American & Latinx Literature Case Studies; Teaching While Privileged

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:15pm
Cheryl Boots / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Privilege comes in many forms whether race, class, gender, or education. According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, 84% of full time faculty are white, 25% of those professors are women. With these overarching statistics nationally, at many institutions, classes that focus on African American or Latinx literature are taught largely, if not completely, by faculty who are not from that racial or cultural demographic. When white faculty teach these courses, they may need to confront their own privilege and cultural “blind spots.” Proposed case study presentations can address teaching either African American or Latinx texts.

Soundtracks of African American Prose

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:44pm
Cheryl Boots / NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

African American works often include references to music that may or may not be recognized by a wide reading audience. For example, the spirituals that Martin Luther King, Jr. chanted in his speeches provide added rhetorical context for his words; yet those who do not know the songs do not have a more nuanced understanding of his oratory. Langston Hughes and James Baldwin both crafted their writing with music in mind. Baldwin acknowledged in the New York Times Book Review that “I…model myself on jazz musicians and try to write the way they sound.”

Leeds IMC 2020: Lines in the Sand: Ecotones and Polity in Medieval Literature

updated: 
Tuesday, September 3, 2019 - 9:45am
Andrew M. Richmond
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 20, 2019

From kingdoms staking claims on opposing riverbanks to landowners arguing over a thorny hedge, transitional environments have long formed the foundations for political and social boundaries. Such material anchors in turn may be claimed to demonstrate the natural legitimacy of these borders and the institutions they define. Yet medieval literature, art, and popular culture overflows with depictions of such ecotones – water to land, mountain to plain, forest to field – that test both the permanence and permeability of the categories and divisions humans impose on their surroundings (and themselves).

ICMS 2020: Medievalist as Auctor

updated: 
Monday, July 29, 2019 - 1:28pm
Erin K. Wagner
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 1, 2019

Whether we consider the high fantasy of Lewis and Tolkien or the contemporary rise in historical fiction set during the Middle Ages, it must be acknowledged that medievalists (and scholars more generally) have long been linked with creative writing. In an era of academia where the traditional university job is far from assured and where representations of the Middle Ages are co-opted by white nationalists, we must acknowledge the wider benefits and contributions of the humanities, while promoting a diverse picture of the Middle Ages. It is more important than ever that the scholastic community embrace its creative side.

Constellations: Connections, Disruptions, and Imaginations in Cinema and Beyond

updated: 
Wednesday, July 24, 2019 - 7:14am
Department of Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Southern California
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, August 1, 2019

First Forum 2019 Graduate Student Conference
Division of Cinema and Media Studies
University of Southern California 
Thursday, October 10, 2019 and Friday, October 11, 2019
 
Constellations:
Connections, Disruptions, and Imaginations in Cinema and Beyond
(A Conference in Three Clusters)

SCMS 2020 CFP — Screening Ourselves: Mediation, Exemplars of Difference, and Cultural Transformation

updated: 
Saturday, August 3, 2019 - 2:54pm
Michael Dalebout — University of California, Berkeley
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 9, 2019

CFP (SCMS 2020) Screening Ourselves: Mediation, Exemplars of Difference, and Cultural Transformation

Digital media proliferates, in part, because it allows individuals to adopt, inhabit, revise, and project their ways of being. Liking, saving, and sharing digital objects shapes our personal and social lives, and has transformed what it means to see and be seen, to garner and wield cultural influence. By self-reflexively mediating ourselves in cultural artifacts, what political claims are we adopting about how the world is, or should be? Which lives are screenable, or screened? 

Performing Medieval Drama in the 21st Century (A Panel Discussion)

updated: 
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 1:50pm
Kyle A. Thomas, Missouri State University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 6, 2019

 

Session Title: Performing Medieval Drama in the 21st Century (A Panel Discussion) at the International Congress on Medieval Studies, Western Michigan University (2020)

Organizer: Kyle A. Thomas (Missouri State University)

Sponsered by the Medieval and Renaissance Drama Society (MRDS) 

Popular Culture in a New Media Age: Trends and Transitions (EXTENDED DEADLINE)

updated: 
Friday, September 6, 2019 - 1:16pm
Hellenic Association for American Studies (HELAAS) and the Department of American Literature and Culture of the School of English of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTh), Greece
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 31, 2019

Ex-Centric Narratives:

Journal of Anglophone Literature, Culture and Media

The Hellenic Association for American Studies (HELAAS) in cooperation with the Department of American Literature and Culture of the School of English of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (AUTh), Greece, is launching the fourth issue of the electronic multi/interdisciplinary open access, refereed journal with the title Ex-centric Narratives: Journal of Anglophone 
Literature, Culture and Media (Ex-Na). The journal addresses academics, scholars and graduate students engaging in the interdisciplinary study of Anglophone literatures, cultures and media and will be published once a year.

Hip Hop Ecologies (Workshop and Special Issue)

updated: 
Friday, July 19, 2019 - 2:09pm
University of Konstanz, Germany
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 30, 2019

Hip Hop Ecologies: A Workshop at the University of Konstanz (June 26-28, 2020)

Hip hop is one of the globally most successful forms of cultural production today. Since its emergence in the African American and Latino neighborhoods of 1970s New York City, it has spread around the world and exerted a considerable impact not only on pop culture, but on societal debates around race, class, public safety, nationality, gender, and a range of other issues. The rapidly expanding field of hip hop studies has examined its artistic development and cultural significance from a variety of angles. What has remained almost entirely absent from scholarly debate is the relationship between hip hop and the environment.

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