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Update: Literary Monsters - SAMLA - November 13-15, 2020

updated: 
Tuesday, May 5, 2020 - 12:05pm
Tracie Provost / Middle Georgia State University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 22, 2020

In today's culture, it's almost impossible to avoid "monsters."  Straight from mythology and legend, these fantastic creatures traipse across our television screens and the pages of our books.  Over centuries and across cultures, the inhuman have represented numerous cultural fears and, in more recent times, desires. They are Other. They are Us. This panel will explore the literal monsters--whether they be mythological, extraterrestrial, or man-made--that populate fiction and film, delving into the cultural, psychological and/or theoretical implications. 

 

Update: Speculative Fiction - SAMLA - November 13-15, 2020

updated: 
Tuesday, May 5, 2020 - 12:05pm
Mert Gareis / Middle Georgia State University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 22, 2020

Speculative fiction covers a broad range of narrative styles and genres.  The cohesive element that pulls works together under the category is that there is some “unrealistic” element, whether it’s magical, supernatural, or a futuristic/technological development: works that fall into the category stray from conventional realism in some way.   For this reason, speculative fiction can be quite broad, including everything from fantasy and magical realism to horror and science fiction—from China Miéville to Margaret Atwood to Philip K. Dick. This panel aims to explore those unrealistic elements and all their varied implications about society, politics, economics, and more.   

Cultures of Collectivity and Manuscript Evidence

updated: 
Wednesday, February 26, 2020 - 3:45pm
The Research Group on Manuscript Evidence at the Midwest Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, May 1, 2020

The Research Group on Manuscript Evidence, in keeping with the MMLA conference’s theme of “Cultures of Collectivity,” is sponsoring panels on collecting and manuscripts, broadly conceived. Possible foci include, strictly by way of example: specific archives, collections, or even gatherings of texts in particular manuscripts; reading communities or scribal centers; book markets; and the collections of material resources involved in manuscript production. We invite all approaches—including hermeneutical, textual, art historical, codicological, and paleographical—across all time periods.

[UPDATE] MLA 2021 CFP: State of the Body: Health and Illness in the 21st Century

updated: 
Wednesday, February 26, 2020 - 3:45pm
Tana Jean Welch / Florida State University College of Medicine
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, March 15, 2020

What methodologies and/or texts best help us make sense of our current bodily relationship to health, illness, and medicine? Papers utilizing posthumanism, new materialism, feminist science studies, or other philosophical tools are welcome. All literary genres and time periods will be considered.

This cfp is purposefully broad; the focus of the panel(s) created will be more specific.

This panel is sponsored by the medical humanities forum of the MLA.

Submit 250- to 500-word abstracts and a CV, by March 15, 2020, to Tana Jean Welch, Florida State University College of Medicine, at tana.welch@med.fsu.edu

MSA 2020 - Millay, Lowell, Teasdale, and the ‘Sentimental’ Modern Poet

updated: 
Wednesday, February 26, 2020 - 10:24am
Modernist Studies Association
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, March 13, 2020

Call for Proposals

Millay, Lowell, Teasdale, and the ‘Sentimental’ Modern Poet

 

Modernist Studies Association

Brooklyn, NY

22-25 October 2020

 

Organized by Sarah Parker (Loughborough University) and Francisco E. Robles (University of Notre Dame)

 

Technoculture Volume 10 (2020)

updated: 
Wednesday, February 26, 2020 - 10:25am
Technoculture: an online journal of technology in society
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 3, 2020

For our tenth year anniversary issue, Technoculture is seeking critical essays and creative works from a broad range of academic disciplines that focus on cultural studies of technology, and especially on the future of the study of technology and culture.

Essays and creative works we publish examine the topic technology and society, or, perhaps, technologies and societies. This call is ongoing and open topic, and we encourage a broad definition of technology. Topics could include depictions of technologies that treat a wide range of subjects related to the social sciences and humanities.

Postcolonial Optimism (MLA 2021)

updated: 
Wednesday, February 26, 2020 - 10:25am
Jeremy De Chavez and Katherine Hallemeier
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, March 15, 2020

Optimism is not readily associated with the postcolonial. Indeed, postcolonial writing has been described as melancholic and postoptimistic, a repository of the injurious legacies of empire. It is a reputation consonant with postcolonialism’s revelatory project of unmasking imperial designs in canonical texts and exposing complicity in postcolonial writing. In addition, almost by definition, the postcolonial novel expresses disillusionment with nationhood and the developmentalist logics that frame it.

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