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Special Issue of American Literature: How Literature Understands Poverty

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2020 - 11:41am
Clare Callahan
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 1, 2020

This special issue examines the role of literature and criticism in addressing poverty and dispossession. In a 2009 Inside Higher Ed op-ed, Keith Gandal predicted that the economic crisis would lead to literary studies finally putting “poverty near the top of the agenda and the center of the field.” Ten years later, poverty has become a focus of scholarship in the social sciences, particularly geography, anthropology, sociology, and critical legal studies. Yet the topic remains stubbornly marginal to literary studies, even though qualitative social scientific methods have been taken up in the discipline as never before.

NeMLA 2021 Session: Narratives of the Economy in the Global South

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2020 - 11:41am
Saronik Bosu
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

The global COVID-19 crisis, and its economic fallout, have re-established two facts - that the economy is a fictive category, and that its inimitable centrality derives essentially from the power of its narratives. Prior to actual policies of austerity or re-openings of the economy, there exist narratives of weathering storms as character-building or the inalienable connection between economic and individual freedom. These narratives help us imagine the economy as a system; most often it becomes palpable because we have learned to tell stories about its origins, maintenance, purity, precarity, and futures. These stories acquire unique characteristics in the global south, a geopolitical category itself that narrativizes economic agon.

Modernism and the Politics of Contradiction

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2020 - 11:41am
Matthew Mersky/ Boston College
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Political contradiction is written all over modernism. No other literary historical period seems quite as striven between the static, apolitical or even conservative outlook of its various key figures on the one hand, and the explosive and even revolutionary formal potential on the other. Woolf’s classism, for example, is met by her quasi-revolutionary declaration that “in or about December, 1910, human character changed.” No literary period so vehemently defines itself against mass culture while also expressing unbridled democratic impulses. Joyce’s defense of autonomous art is met by the opposite impulse in Ulysses to forge an aesthetic of the everyday.

Oil & Water: Petroculture & the Blue Humanities in Conversation

updated: 
Friday, June 19, 2020 - 11:30am
NEMLA 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Signs of the prominence of oil as an object of study in the Environmental Humanities abound: the increasing circulation of terms like “Petroculture” and “petrocapital,” the emergence of the Energy Humanities as a sub-field, and the nearly simultaneous publication of recent volumes such as Living Oil (2016); Petrocultures (2017); and Energy Humanities: An Anthology (2017). Scholars in a range of disciplines are working to theorize and bring into focus the myriad economic, environmental, social, and imaginative ramifications of our relationship with—and dependence on—oil.

Stoicism in literature: the power of inner transformation

updated: 
Thursday, June 4, 2020 - 11:40am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Stoicism is an ancient Greco-Roman philosophy of life based on the notion that "happiness," or eudaemonia, is internally generated, and consists in improving one's own character in the service of humanity at large. One of its major exponents was the first century Roman philosopher Epictetus, who has had a consistent influence on western philosophy, religion, and literature, though the theme of Epictetus and literature has been comparatively little explored.

Spark Volume 3 Call

updated: 
Thursday, May 28, 2020 - 2:23pm
Spark: Journal on activism in writing, rhetoric, and literacy studies
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, December 5, 2020

Spark: A 4C4Equality Journal

an open-access, online, peer-reviewed journal on activism in writing, rhetoric, and literacy studies

 

Spark 2020 Call: Volume 3, April 2021

 

Call for Submissions

The Spaces of the Renaissance Anatomy Theatre

updated: 
Thursday, May 28, 2020 - 2:53pm
Vernon Press
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, July 30, 2020

Vernon Press invites chapters for an edited volume on the spaces within Renaissance anatomy theatre.

The collection asks, how did actions and conversations taking place within a Renaissance/Early Modern anatomy theatre make their way into European society? How did public dissection and anatomical research influence the arts, government, or society? This collection examines the spaces of intersections within the anatomy theatre, the aspects of gender present in anatomical discourse and images, and a shared interest in the physical body and its parts.  

Multiple Temporalities

updated: 
Thursday, May 28, 2020 - 2:54pm
Scott DeShong
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Northeast Modern Language Association Convention in Philadelphia, 11-14 March 2021. Abstracts for 15-20 minute papers that consider multiple temporalities within or across works of literature, criticism, or other forms of media, discourse, or performance, such as temporalities that are varied, conflicting, competing, haphazard, (re)constructed, broken, or accidental. How do temporal modes or frameworks--or their enforcement, or their lack, or resistance to them--reflect differences of intention, ideology, social or natural order, technology, ontology, or ethics? In what ways are temporalities variously material, subjective, human, organic, or inhuman?

Emerging Trends in Twenty-First-Century Horror

updated: 
Thursday, May 28, 2020 - 2:54pm
LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 15, 2021

CFP: Emerging Trends in Twenty-First-Century Horror

Deadline for submissions:  January 15, 2021

full name / name of organization:  LIT: Literature Interpretation Theory

contact email:  litjourn@yahoo.com

Call for Book Chapters: Sexual Identities and Assault in Children’s and Adolescent Literature and Culture

updated: 
Thursday, May 28, 2020 - 2:53pm
Vernon Press
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 31, 2020

Vernon Press invites chapter proposals on the theme: Sexual Identities and Assault in Children’s and Adolescent Literature and Culture for an edited collection Voices From the Wreckage: YA Voices in the #MeToo Movement edited by Kimberly Greenfield Karshner (Lorain County Community College).

new volume on Approaches to Teaching the Works of Margaret Atwood

updated: 
Friday, July 24, 2020 - 11:47am
Lauren Rule Maxwell
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 31, 2020

The MLA Press published Approaches to Teaching Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale and Other Works in 1996. Now the press is seeking contributions for a new volume to explore both the teaching of Atwood’s publications since that time and 21st-century approaches to her earlier works, such as strategies for teaching The Handmaid’s Tale that draw on the Hulu TV series, the graphic novel, and/or The Testaments.

SAMLA (South Atlantic Modern Language Association) 2020, “Transgression and Adaptation in Hispanic Cultures”

updated: 
Thursday, May 28, 2020 - 2:53pm
Elena Lahr-Vivaz
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 26, 2020

This panel will explore the many forms of adaptation in Hispanic cultures, offering a comparative dialogue on the multiform products and processes of adaptation within Spain and Spanish America. We encourage contributors to employ interdisciplinary tools and theoretical perspectives that open new conversations on the porousness of cultural edges and the artifacts that sustain and deny them. We welcome paper proposals on topics including studies of texts, genres, contact zones, and analyses of adaptation itself, among others.

 

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