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Special Issue on "Modern and Contemporary Irish Writing"

updated: 
Monday, August 31, 2020 - 1:25pm
Humanities
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, February 28, 2021

Dear Colleagues,

We seek original, previously unpublished essays for a Special Issue of Humanities on the topic modern and contemporary Irish writing.

Irish writing has emerged, especially since the turn of the last century, as a space of compelling and varied production. While we remain mindful of Emer Nolan’s important proviso that the Republic of Ireland “now appropriates all ‘success’ (including literary ‘success’) as evidence of its own dynamism, tolerance, and inclusiveness,” we are nevertheless interested in examining the ways in which historical and emergent forms of expression have combined in contemporary Ireland to produce this present moment of innovation and compelling creativity.

Red Ink: Critical Essays on Horror Comic Books

updated: 
Monday, August 31, 2020 - 1:23pm
Fernando Gabriel Pagnoni Berns
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, November 15, 2020

Red Ink: Critical Essays on Horror Comic Books

 

Deadline for ProposalsNov. 15, 2020

 

Full name/name of organization:

Fernando Gabriel Pagnoni Berns (Universidad de Buenos Aires) and John Darowski (University of Louisville)

 

Contact email: redinkproject@yahoo.com

 

Book of Essays on Claire Messud's Novels

updated: 
Monday, August 31, 2020 - 1:23pm
Sandra Singer / University of Guelph
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, April 30, 2021

Entanglement and Entropy: The Weave of Claire Messud’s Novels

This is a call for chapters for an edited collection of essays on Claire Messud’s novels. Since this would be the first book-length study of her work, chapters on all of her six novels are sought (When the World Was Steady, The Last Life: A Novel, The Hunters, The Emperor's Children, The Woman Upstairs and The Burning Girl). Papers that foreground narratological, historical, cultural and ideological features are most welcome.

Fictions of Distance in Recent American Literature

updated: 
Monday, August 31, 2020 - 1:23pm
AmLit – American Literatures
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, January 31, 2021

Call for Papers

Fictions of Distance in Recent American Literature

AmLit – American Literatures  – Themed Volume

Guest Editors:

Fabian Eggers and Sonja Pyykkö, PhD candidates at the Graduate School of North American Studies, John F. Kennedy Institute, Freie Universität Berlin

Kalamazoo ICMS 2021 - Whatever Happened to Baby Cain? Ambiguous Childhood in Medieval Literature

updated: 
Wednesday, August 26, 2020 - 11:46am
Alexandra Claridge
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 15, 2020

 

Growing up is a perennial feature of human societies. While anxieties surrounding childhood are universal, the manifestations of these concerns vary between cultures. This series of sessions proposes to shed light upon the nexus of ambiguity surrounding the medieval child, as depicted in contemporaneous literature. We invite abstracts for papers that will explore the representation of childhood in texts of any language, genre, and period within the Middle Ages. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

 

 

 

• Historical notions of education, child-rearing, and ʻgood

 

behaviourʼ.

 

• Non-human and/or monstrous children.

 

• Infantilised adults and inescapable childhood.

Aging and Ageism in the Covid-19 Pandemic A Digital Symposium by the North American Network of Aging Studies

updated: 
Wednesday, August 26, 2020 - 11:45am
North American Network of Aging Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, September 20, 2020

The 2020 COVID-19 pandemic impacts the lives of societies, communities, and individuals deeply. Since the beginning of the pandemic, experts, scholars, journalists, and individuals have testified time and again to the fact that the virus does not impact everyone in the same ways. Identifying factors that heighten vulnerability is an important part of protecting those at risk. However, just as it is vital to recognize that racism and not race translates to higher exposure to and less protection from the virus for people of colour, it is crucial to recognize that ageism and not age is the greatest factor that puts older people at risk.