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Deadline Extended and First Edition Available in Beta: Call for Digital Scholarly Edition for New Publication Series

updated: 
Thursday, February 18, 2021 - 1:30pm
Illinois Open Publishing Network (IOPN)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, July 31, 2021

Deadline Extension: Due to an extension of our funding timeline, we are making a significant extension of this CFP deadline, which will now be July 31, 2021 (moving back work on the proposed edition by a semester as well). We hope this gives people more time to develop a proposal than the original tight turnaround, especially after the semester is over and people can take a step back from what is an unusually disruptive year. We are happy to talk to people about possible proposals. Updated CFP text is below.

REMINDER: book chapters for collection on Chen Qing Ling (The Untamed)

updated: 
Wednesday, December 16, 2020 - 12:54pm
Cathy Yue Wang/Shanghai Normal University and Maria Alberto/University of Utah
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, January 15, 2021

REMINDER: We are seeking book chapters for an edited scholarly collection on the Chinese web drama Chen Qing Ling (The Untamed)!

We are soliciting book chapters for an edited scholarly collection on Chen Qing Ling/The Untamed, its contexts, and its audiences. This will be a multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary collection that considers the show's popularity, influences, and effects from a variety of cultural and critical viewpoints.

Migrant and Seasonal Farmworker Education in the United States

updated: 
Wednesday, December 16, 2020 - 12:54pm
The Journal of Migrant Education
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, May 31, 2021

The Journal of Migrant Education is seeking submissions for the next publication, scheduled for 2021. We are interested in contributions that do scholarly work related to migrant education in the United States, share best practices in program such as Migrant Head Start Programs, K-12 Migrant Education, High School Equivalency Program, the College Assistance Migrant Programs, and other entities that work with seasonal farmworkers and their families, and/or creative expressions of lived experience from any member in the community.

Genres of Empire: A Special Issue of College Literature

updated: 
Wednesday, December 16, 2020 - 10:53am
Alyssa A. Hunziker and Mitch R. Murray
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, April 2, 2021

Call for Papers: Genres of Empire
A Special Issue of College Literature: A Journal of Critical Literary Studies

Guest Editors:
Alyssa A. Hunziker, Oklahoma State University
Mitch R. Murray, University of Florida

Theoretical Studies in Literature and Art

updated: 
Wednesday, December 16, 2020 - 9:53am
Theoretical Studies in Literature and Art (ISSN0257-0254)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, July 31, 2021

Theoretical Studies in Literature and Art (ISSN 0257-0254), launched in 1980 and published bimonthly, a most highly recognized peer-reviewed journal in China, publishes original papers in Chinese or English in arts and humanities, especially literary studies. We welcome MLA-style papers of 6000-12000 words in the fields of literary theory, critical theory, aesthetics, philosophy of art, cultural studies, etc.

JOYCE PAYS, JOYSPACE (OR JOYCE AND SPACE)

updated: 
Wednesday, December 16, 2020 - 9:53am
Joyce Studies in Italy
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, February 2, 2021

JOYCE PAYS, JOYSPACE (OR JOYCE AND SPACE)

Joyce studies in Italy vol. 23 (2021)

PAPER SUBMISSION DEADLINE: FEBRUARY 2, 2021

Joyce Studies in Italy, a peer-reviewed annual journal dealing with all areas of Joyce studies, invites Joycean scholars to submit papers (max 5.000 words including bibliography, no images) on the subject of Joyce and Space.

Searching for the Modern Girl: Flappers and Bright Young Things Around the World 1920s–40s

updated: 
Wednesday, December 16, 2020 - 9:52am
The Space Between Journal
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, December 30, 2021

While the Bright Young Things of England and the flappers of the America remain fixed in cultural memory, their incarnations elsewhere around the world have all but disappeared from history.  Affiliation with a feminized Anglo-European metropole may have contributed to their invisibility in the colonial peripheries, constructed around paradigms of masculine nationhood or anxious to distinguish themselves from Anglo-European mass culture. Despite her iconic status in the interwar period, the stigma associated with this notorious female figure in her own time seems to have carried over into the academy, inhibiting serious critical analysis of her role and function as an image for modernity.