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Teaching American Literature: A Journal of Theory and Practice, Fall 2020

updated: 
Friday, September 4, 2020 - 1:06pm
Central Piedmont Community College
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 15, 2020

Teaching American Literature: A Journal of Theory and Practice; Central Piedmont Community College

Deadline extended: October 15, 2020

Teaching American Literature: A Journal of Theory and Practice, is currently accepting submissions for our Fall 2020 issue: Teaching Horror and the Weird in the American Literature Classroom, to be guest edited by Chris Brawley, author of Nature and the Numinous in Mythopoeic Fantasy Literature.

 

Submit articles to Patricia.Bostian@cpcc.edu.

Working-class Women Write! A One-Day Conference at the University of Northampton

updated: 
Friday, September 4, 2020 - 1:05pm
University of Northampton
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, December 30, 2020

While women have contributed a huge amount to literary history, most of those women came from the middle classes; working-class women rarely had either the leisure time or the educational opportunities to produce their own writing. While Aphra Behn and Jane Austen were writing in the late 17th and early 19th centuries respectively, the first British novel by a working-class woman, Miss Nobody by Ethel Carnie Holdsworth, was not published until 1913.

Narrating Violence and Environments in Latin America (NeMLA 2021 Panel)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 9, 2020 - 8:47pm
Kevin Ennis / Brown University
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

In After Nature: A Politics for the Anthropocene (2015), Jedediah Purdy describes what he calls the "environmental imagination," which comprises “how we see and how we learn to see, how we suppose the world works, how we suppose that it matters, and what we feel we have at stake in it. It is an implicit, everyday metaphysics, the bold speculations buried in our ordinary lives” (6-7). Amidst the gravity of the Anthropocene today, Purdy examines the linkages between environmental imagination and “ways of acting, personally, politically, and legally, that have shaped the world in concrete ways” (7).

Fluid Boundaries: Gender and the Freedom of Movement in American Literature

updated: 
Friday, September 4, 2020 - 1:12pm
GIRES-Global Institute for Research Education & Scholarship
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 8, 2020

Course Facilitator: Olga Akroyd , Ph.D 

The Idea
GIRES, the Global Institute for Research, Education & Scholarship is proud to introduce a series of short seminars dedicated to literature. We embrace Scott Fitzgerald’s opinion about the beauty of this fine craft: “You discover that your longings are universal longings, that you’re not lonely and isolated from anyone. You belong.” We do belong to this world and we hope that we will travel you through the great works that altered our mentality, matured  feelings and made us dreamers. Our very own, Dr. Olga Akroyd will be the guide in this wonderful literary journey.  

Sport: Business or Lifestyle? The Impact and Trajectory of Modern Athletics

updated: 
Friday, September 4, 2020 - 1:12pm
GIRES-Global Institute for Research Education & Scholarship
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 18, 2020

International Conference 

Thematic Approach

The international conference organized by GIRES focuses on the exploration of Sports as a global phenomenon and its impact on economy, society, culture and politics.

Sport activities have long been part of our civilization. Ancients Greeks used to say that a healthy mind resided in a healthy body, and throughout history, nations have praised athletes for their achievements because they embodied physical perfection and glory.

NCSA 2021: Rediscovering Nineteenth-Century Studies (Roundtable Session)

updated: 
Monday, August 31, 2020 - 6:37pm
Benjamin D. O'Dell / Georgia Gwinnett College
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 1, 2020

This roundtable invites abstracts for short position papers reflecting on the present state of nineteenth-century studies.  How do recent developments in and around the field change our understanding of the nineteenth-century as a site of inquiry?  Papers might include, but are not limited to, the following:       

Intersectionalities of Class in Early Modern English Literature

updated: 
Monday, September 14, 2020 - 2:43pm
Ronda Arab and Laurie Ellinghausen
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2020

CFP:  Intersectionalities of Class in Early Modern English Literature

 

Eds. Ronda Arab (Simon Fraser University) and Laurie Ellinghausen (University of Missouri – Kansas City)

 

 

The editors invite essays for an edited volume on intersectionalities of class in early modern English literature. 

 

Disinformation Cultures

updated: 
Monday, August 31, 2020 - 1:25pm
Moving Image and Media Studies Graduate Group (UMN)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, November 30, 2020

“Disinformation” emerged from the Soviet intelligence bureaucracy during the Cold War as a tactic for managing perception and consensus through the media. Rather than refuting or suppressing ideas that undermined the state agenda, false information and simulated events were disseminated to destabilize the positive character of truth itself. 

Thomas Merton and "Justice" (CEA 4/821-4/10/21)

updated: 
Monday, August 31, 2020 - 1:25pm
College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 1, 2020

International Thomas Merton Society

at the

College English Association

52stTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE

 

                                                                                      Birmingham Sheraton Hotel, Birmingham, AL

Alluvium Journal: Contemporary Representations of Homelessness (November 2020)

updated: 
Monday, August 31, 2020 - 2:16pm
Alluvium Journal
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 15, 2020

Alluvium Call for Proposals: Articles on Contemporary Representations of Homelessness

 

Alluvium is an open access journal featuring short essays of around 2000-2500 words on key issues and emerging trends in 21st century writing, culture and criticism. The journal publishes around six issues a year enabling vital current ideas to find a rapid readership.

 

We invite proposals for articles in our Autumn 2020 issue of Alluvium: Contemporary Representations of Homelessness

The deadline for abstracts is the 15th of September and we particularly welcome proposals from post-graduate researchers and early career researchers.

 

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