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The Ancient and Modern Traditions of Introspective Analysis

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 9:50am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

In a letter to Lucilius, Seneca distinguishes between a person's being and "the trappings in which he is clothed," urging his interlocutor to "consider [the] soul" in order to distinguish true being from false appearance. In addition to the distinction he makes between being and appearance, Seneca indicates here an analytical tool by which Lucilius can learn to see beyond illusory appearances in order to comprehend the true nature of things (animum intuere). Seneca's instrumental approach to this analysis constitutes a major component of the Ancient tradition of introspective analysis: across genres ancient authors such as Virgil, Propertius, Martial, Horace, Tacitus, Plato, and Aristotle performed similar analyses.

Established and Contemporary Caribbean Voices (Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Convention)

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 9:50am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Caribbean novelists, poets, and playwrights have contributed inestimable riches to the world of literature. How have the themes and styles of established Caribbean voices, including Brathwaite, Walcott, Cliff, and Naipaul, been adapted or diverged from by younger Caribbean voices? Abstracts should be a maximum of 300 words and be submitted via the Northeast Modern Language Association website. Go to http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention/callforpapers/submit.html

Distinctions between Rabindranath Tagore's Shorter and Longer Fiction (Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Convention)

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 9:50am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Bengali author Rabindranath Tagore, the first non-Westerner to be awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, was a prolific writer in diverse literary genres, including both long and short-form fiction. This panel explores similarities and differences between Tagore’s short stories on the one hand, and his novellas and novels, on the other. Did the Bengali author tend to treat specific themes at length while reserving other motifs for his shorter fiction? Concerning setting, characterization, and plot trajectory, what are similarities and differences between Tagore’s shorter tales and his novels? Are there differences between Tagore’s stories and his novels regarding their accessibility and currency in the present day and for transnational audiences?

19th-century British Novels and the Shape of British Writing Today (Northeast Modern Language Association Annual Convention)

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 9:50am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

To what extent have 19th-century British novelists, such as Austen, Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy, influenced the works of contemporary British writers? Is there a continuity of themes and styles, or have 21st-century British authors fundamentally broken away from examples of the past? Abstracts should be a maximum of 300 words and be submitted via the Northeast Modern Language Association website. Go to http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention/callforpapers/submit.html

Strengthening Connections: Teaching and Writing in Secondary and Post-Secondary Classrooms

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 9:50am
The Wisconsin English Journal
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, October 31, 2020

In a time of unrest and division, the WEJ is interested in strengthening connections. While the WEJ remains focused on student writing in high school, community college, and university environments, it is also crucial for scholars to consider the transition from secondary to post-secondary education and how instructors at each level can work with students who are developing writing expertise. To that end, the WEJ would like to welcome submissions on a variety of related topics:

Assessment and/or Learning Outcomes (CEA 4/8/21–4/10/21)

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 9:49am
College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 1, 2020

Subject: Call for Papers: Assessment and/or Learning Outcomes at CEA 2021

 

Call for Papers, Assessment and/or Learning Outcomes at CEA 2021

April 8-10, 2021 | Birmingham, Alabama

Sheraton Hotel, Birmingham | 2101 Richard Arrington Jr Blvd N, Birmingham, AL 35203

The College English Association, a gathering of scholar-teachers in English studies, welcomes proposals for presentations on Assessment and/or Learning Outcomes for our 52nd annual conference. Submit your proposal at www.cea-web.org

Endless Beginner: Adrienne Rich in the Twenty-First Century

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 9:49am
Cynthia R. Wallace / Arizona Quarterly
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2020

Re-reading Adrienne Rich in the quickly shifting crises of the year 2020, one senses the renewed urgency of her ethico-political project as a citizen poet seeking to “believe the fever can break, the sick body politic come back to life” (A Human Eye 98). Throughout her poetic career Rich challenged the perceived disconnect between poetry and material social good, and while her early and mid-career poems may be the most frequently anthologized, the poetry and prose she published in the second half of her six-decade project continues an extraordinary trajectory of expanding solidarities and poetic technique.

NeMLA 2021 CFP What Goes Up Must Come Down: High and Low Theories of the Victorian Novel

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 9:49am
Anick Rolland
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

CFP / / What Goes Up Must Come Down: High and Low Theories of the Victorian Novel

This panel examines high and low theories of the Victorian novel. Value of the 19th-century novel has fluctuated over time and under the influence of critics. Taking core theories into renewed consideration, this panel aims to gain perspective over high and low culture in its relation to the novel.

Call for Abstracts: NeMLA 2021 Panel (Virtual/Hybrid Platform) on Newspapers, Modernism, and Transnational Print Networks

updated: 
Friday, September 18, 2020 - 9:48am
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

The 52nd NeMLA (Northeast Modern Language Association) Convention (Philadelphia, PA) is now going to be held on a hybrid/virtual platform between March 11 and 14, 2021. This means you can present your papers virtually from anywhere in the world without having to travel to Philadelphia, PA. We now hope to hear more from scholars and students living outside of the US. Please consider sending your abstracts to our panels by September 30! See this link for more instructions: http://www.buffalo.edu/nemla/convention/callforpapers/submit.html

 Reposting my own panel description here for anyone interested in global modernism and print networks:

Call for Book Chapters- Paris in the Americas: Yesterday and Today- OCT 1st DEADLINE

updated: 
Wednesday, September 16, 2020 - 11:46am
Carole Salmon
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 1, 2020

Call for Book Chapters- Paris in the Americas: Yesterday and Today

Vernon Press invites book chapter proposals for the forthcoming scholarly volume Paris in the Americas: Yesterday and Today, an interdisciplinary edited collection of essays that will examine the long-established relationship between Paris and North, Central, and South America from the 15th century until today.

NeMLA 2021: Fairy Tales and Adaptation

updated: 
Wednesday, September 16, 2020 - 11:45am
Ana Oancea, University of Delaware
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Fairy Tales and Adaptation

 

This panel is part of the 52nd annual convention of the NeMLA, held March 11-14, 2021. Presenters will be able to give their papers either virtually, or in person in Philadelphia.

The panel proposes a discussion of the transformations fairy tales undergo when being adapted into new media (for example, Hansel and Gretel as an opera), new cultures (Hans Christian Andersen’s Little Mermaid as Hayao Miyazaki’s Ponyo) and new historical or theoretical contexts (Catherine Breillat’s Sleeping Beauty).

ECR/Grad Students: call for book reviews, popular culture/cultural studies

updated: 
Wednesday, September 16, 2020 - 11:41am
PopMeC research blog
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, January 31, 2021

This call is for our book recommendation section. We aim at recommending books that we find relevant in the realm of the representation of the US, as well as in the related cultural studies. We’d like to share books that we found inspiring, useful, and engaging, delving into culturally relevant topics, popular culture products, public reception, cultural politics, minority/discriminated groups’ representation, collective imaginaries fueled by cinema, music, comics, TV series, public performances, and whatnot. 

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