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2020 Siegel McDaniel Award for Graduate Work on Philip Roth

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 12:00pm
Philip Roth Society
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, November 30, 2020

2020 Siegel McDaniel Award for Graduate Research on Philip Roth

 

The annual Siegel/McDaniel Award, sponsored by the Philip Roth Society, recognizes high-quality graduate student papers written within the past year on any aspect of Philip Roth’s work.

 

To be considered for the award, eligible graduate students have two options:

 

1. They can submit a clean copy of their 10-15 page essay, double-spaced, in 12 point Times New Roman font to Maggie McKinley, the Philip Roth Society Program Director, at mmckinle@harpercollege.edu.

Medieval and Early Modern Literature at CEA (April 8-10, 2021)

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 11:59am
Lynne Simpson / College English Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 1, 2020

The College English Association’s 52st national conference, from April 8-10, 2021, will focus on the theme of justice, and will be held in Birmingham, Alabama, where the freedom ensured by civil rights has been contested by the government in both the past and present. Birmingham’s notoriety as a focal point of the Civil Rights Movement, including the Birmingham Campaign, the imprisonment of Martin Luther King, Jr., and the writing of his “Letter from Birmingham Jail” is matched by the city’s renown for forging steel, founding Veteran’s Day, and hosting the USA’s second-oldest drag queen pageant.

Multimodal Comics: The Evolution of Comics Studies

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 1:38pm
Studies in Comics
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 1, 2020

Multimodal Comics: The Evolution of Comics Studies

Edited Essay Collection

(Madeline B. Gangnes, Chris Murray, and Julia Round, eds. Intellect Books, 2021)

 

Multimodality is of increasing relevance to human daily life. Comics are a unique and informative site in which to study this concept, as they rely on complex interactions between word and image (Cohn et al, 2017). This collection will bring together leading international research on this theme, developing comics theory and speaking to additional media and disciplines.

NeMLA 2021: British Literature and Film: Finding 'Englishness' [hybrid/virtual platform]

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 11:59am
NeMLA 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

In this session, we will especially focus on how the British classic literature of the 19th and early 20th centuries have been adapted concerning Thatcherism, the heritage industry, colonialism, Britishness (Englishness). The so-called "Heritage Fever," which hit British society in the 1980s, was largely supported by national-led policy. In the 1980s, for example, cultural heritage preservation movements spread nationwide; museums and heritage centers around the country were created. A great deal of British interest in the so-called “Old England,” such as visiting historic sites, became an honor factor.

Proposed MLA 2021 Just-In-Time Roundtable Session: The Limits of Academic Freedom at Religious Colleges and Universities

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 1:38pm
Jack Dudley and Dave Wehner, Mount St. Mary's University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, September 18, 2020

This roundtable invites short reflections on the tensions and limits of teaching and studying literature at religious colleges and universities. Do institutional commitments, positions, and documents (conduct oaths, pledges, church constitutions, and doctrinal statements) as well as campus cultures, constituencies, and attitudes implicitly and explicitly limit what can be taught and published? How have you navigated, resisted, and/or adapted to these limits?

Per Just-In-Time Session guidelines, accepted panelists must be MLA members by Sept. 22.

Re-thinking the Postcolonial: Texts and Contexts

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 1:01pm
NEW LITERARIA JOURNAL IN COLLABORATION WITH ASSAM UNIVERSITY(A CENTRAL UNIVERSITY), INDIA
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, September 15, 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS

New Literaria Journal, in collaboration with the Department of English, Assam University(A Central University), India invites papers for its International e-Conference on ‘Re-thinking the Postcolonial: Texts and Contexts’ to be held on 25th, 26th and 27th September, 2020.

 

CONCEPT NOTE

The Latinx Side of Western America

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 12:58pm
Laboratorio per lo Studio Letterario del Fumetto, ICLA Research Committee on Comics Studies and Graphic Narrative
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 2, 2020

Conference: Visual Depictions of the American West. How the West Was Drawn and What It Showed Us. Venice, 13-16 September 2021.

https://www.venicewestconference.com/

 

Panel: The Latinx Side of Western America.

Chair: Dr. Fernanda Díaz-Basteris, Cornell College.

mdiazbasteris@cornellcollege.edu

 

Unraveling the Anthropocene: Race, Environment, and Pandemic

updated: 
Friday, September 11, 2020 - 12:58pm
Liberal Arts Collective at The Pennsylvania State University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, October 15, 2020

This year, the Liberal Arts Collective at Penn State is launching a conference-style podcast, "Unraveling the Anthropocene: Race, Environment, and Pandemic,” which will run during Fall 2020 to early Spring 2021. This podcast seeks to interview a variety of academics, artists, activists, or community members to feature their work and experiences as they try to understand, explain, alleviate, or simply capture the contemporary phenomena that fall under these themes.  Speakers will be volunteering to remotely record a 15-minute long informal conversation about their work or experience. Parallel events include a reading group and a closing roundtable.

Special Issue, Mississippi Quarterly: Mass Incarceration in the U.S. South

updated: 
Friday, September 4, 2020 - 1:34pm
Mississippi Quarterly
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, December 1, 2020

Call for Papers

 

Special Issue, Mississippi Quarterly: Mass Incarceration in the U.S. South

Guest editors, Katie Owens-Murphy and Jeanine Weekes-Schroer

 

 

If you are Black, you were born in jail, in the North as well as the South. Stop talking about the South. As long as you are south of the Canadian border, you’re South.

 ~Malcolm X

 

UNLOCKING POTENTIAL: Adapting Prison Pedagogies for University Classes

updated: 
Friday, September 4, 2020 - 1:33pm
Audrey Gradzewicz/NEMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

Because in the United States access to a quality education
is raced and classed, educational opportunities--or rather,
the dearth of them--are linked to imprisonment. Kathryn
Hanson and Deborah Stipek write, “Dropouts are 3.5
times more likely to be arrested than high school
graduates. Nationally, 68 percent of all males in prison do
not have a high school diploma.” Even more strikingly,
Begin to Read reports that 85% of juveniles tried in
juvenile court and over 60% of incarcerated adults are
functionally illiterate.

Philomela and Her Descendents: Re-membering Traumatized Women in Literature

updated: 
Friday, September 4, 2020 - 1:33pm
Audrey Gradzewcz/NEMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

In Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Philomela is devoted sister, is victim of a brutal rape and mutilation, is weaver, is revenger, is nightingale. The specter of Philomela haunts the western canon, where she is a shorthand for rape, where the song of the nightingale is shorthand for suffering. Where Philomela is invoked, the ingenious weaver of the Metamorphoses is newly silenced by threadbare retellings. In Chaucer’s Legend of Good Women, Philomela is severed from both revenge and transformation; as Lavinia in Shakespeare’s Titus Andronicus, she is severed from the consolation and commiseration of other women; and in Eliot’s The Wasteland, her “inviolable voice” is severed from her violated body, laments to the crude unhearing.

Responses to Psychotherapeutic Discourses of Depression in 21st-century Literature

updated: 
Friday, September 4, 2020 - 1:33pm
Northeast MLA 2021
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 30, 2020

How does contemporary literature respond to and reimagine psychotherapeutic narratives of depression? What insight into the experience of depression and the depressed self do literary texts offer that may be lost in psychotherapeutic accounts and vice versa? How do literary and psychotherapeutic discourses of depression, particularly with respect to etiologies and target psychological and affective states, complement each other? How do they resist each other? Does literature endow psychotherapy with existential significance and epistemological legitimacy and/or dismiss it with irritation as in Elif Batuman’s The Idiot? What narrative possibilities and problems do literary texts discover in the modes of psychotherapy prevalent today?

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