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Journal Articles for Special Issue: "Teaching Girlhood Studies"

updated: 
Wednesday, July 28, 2021 - 11:13pm
Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 15, 2021

Girlhood Studies, as an academic discipline, is still growing. Since some educational institutions do include girls’ studies as part of a special curriculum, an academic program, a certificate course, a minor, or as part of Women’s Studies or Gender Studies, Girlhood Studies does have a presence in academia although at this stage rarely in an autonomous department. This interest in the pedagogies and practices of teaching Girlhood Studies is an important aspect of its growth as a field of study at university level, at school, and outside of formal academic settings.

The Journal of American Culture -Theme Issue: Generations

updated: 
Tuesday, June 8, 2021 - 11:18am
Shay Rahm / JAC
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 1, 2021

Generational Studies is growing as an area of research as multiple generations now co-exist in the workforce. Each generational cohort brings with it diverse viewpoints and varied lived experiences—sometimes quite disparate of one another. Therefore, exploring these age cohorts potentially provides an opportunity to discuss and better understand the challenges of creating cohesiveness as well as discovering the interrelatedness of cultural experiences that have the potential to connect generations.

We welcome papers on topics related to America’s generations including: Baby Boomers, Generation Jones, Generation X, Xennials, Millennials (Gen Y), and iGen (Gen Z).

Journal of Science Fiction Special Issue on Young Adult Speculative Fiction

updated: 
Tuesday, June 8, 2021 - 11:18am
MOSF Journal of Science Fiction
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, August 1, 2021

Young adult (YA) speculative fiction routinely engages with many of life’s most important questions: love, death, relationships, the future of the planet, identity, belonging, and our very future as human beings. Whether styled after the classical bildungsroman or otherwise, coming of age narratives in the speculative genre encourage readers to challenge existing power structures and advocate self-expression and self-confidence. They also return agency to those often divested of power by the institutional and social structures that restrict freedoms based on age, and recenter the adolescent as a critical social figure.

The Idea of the Shakespearean Actor

updated: 
Friday, June 4, 2021 - 11:15am
Sally Barnden, Emer McHugh, Miranda Fay Thomas
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Call for Papers

The Idea of the Shakespearean Actor 

An edited collection

Eds. Sally Barnden, Emer McHugh, and Miranda Fay Thomas 

 

 

 

What comes to mind when we think about the Shakespearean actor, or Shakespearean acting? What do actors past, present, and future consider ‘Shakespearean acting’ to be? Is the idea of the Shakespearean actor helpful, or does it limit and restrict the notion of what Shakespearean performance can be?