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Revisions and Adaptations - part of the NEASECS 2021 conference

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:31pm
Elizabeth Bolger / Fordham University
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, June 25, 2021

Revisions and adaptations of texts, histories and ideas can be seen as a kind of traffic between one form of representation and another.  This panel is open to papers that address any variation on that theme with respect to the long eighteenth century. Topics can range widely—from, for instance, a paper that considers a single eighteenth-century author’s revision or adaptation of her own work, to one that analyzes recent or current revisions and adaptations of eighteenth-century texts, history or ideas on social media. Papers on parodies, cross-cultural, cross-national and/or linguistic adaptations or appropriations, debates about how to frame the very idea of eighteenth-century history—or anything beyond or in between—will all be considered. 

Digital Arguments

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:15pm
Pacific Ancient and Modern Languages Association
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 30, 2021

This session seeks to explore scholarly work that are composed through non-traditional forms of academic writing. Everything from the video essay (including remix, digital argument, MeMorial, videographic criticism, etc.) to the digital book will be considered. Any work that explores the affordances of alternative form is welcome. Work that egages with the conference theme, "City of God, City of Destruction," is appreciated but all work will be considered. 

Please submit a description of the project you would like to present at pamla.ballastacademic.com or email mcdermor@usc.edu for assistance submitting. 

Migration, Belonging, and Afro-Europeanness: Current Articulations and Future Perspectives

updated: 
Friday, August 20, 2021 - 9:00am
Northeastern Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

This panel aims to explore how writers and filmmakers have articulated questions of Blackness and Europeanness, migration and cultural belonging, colonial histories and decolonial futures.

In recent decades, artists, scholars, and activists from all over Europe have interrogated and problematized wishful narratives about Europe as a democratic stronghold and a multicultural, borderless space. Working in different media, forms, and genres, these works address urgent questions, such as the racialization of migration, the persistent social and economic inequalities of urban spaces, and the legacies of repressed colonial histories.

Teaching the Holocaust from a Social Justice Perspective

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:15pm
Susan Jacobowitz/NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Last year marked the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. Only the very youngest survivors of the Holocaust are still with us – they survived as children but are in their nineties now, and we lose more of them every year. Soon there will be no first-person witnesses as the Holocaust recedes further into the past and becomes something less connected to memory.

Metatextuality in Contemporary French Caribbean Fiction

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:15pm
Julia Galmiche-Essue / University of Toronto
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Call for Papers - Session "Metatextuality in Contemporary French Caribbean Fiction" at the 53rd Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association (March 10-13, Baltimore, MD) 

This panel focuses on metatextual practices in contemporary French Caribbean fiction. Metatextuality here is understood as a form of intertextual discourse in which one text refers to itself or another text and critically reflects upon it. We welcome proposals that focus on the conditions of production, publication, distribution, circulation, consumption, transmission, and recognition (or lack thereof) of literary texts.

Preferred languages: French or English.

Deadline: September 30, 2021

Latin American Women Writers and Filmmakers Caring for the Environment

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:15pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Over the last twenty years there has been a significant increase in the literary production and critical analysis of environmental matters in Latin American literature. Scholars have established the relation between ecocritical and decolonial studies (French, 2005; DeLoughrey, 2005; Taylor Kane, 2010; Barbas-Rhoden; Heffes, 2013) but there is still need for further exploration of the relation between ecocriticism and gender studies in the region. This panel seeks to explore how Latin American women artists narrate the intersectional nature of environmental matters and to what extent art can effect change in attitudes and behaviours.

Solo Theater and Performance

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:15pm
Center for Performance Research and Cultural Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, June 30, 2021

 Solo Theater and Performance is visualized as an edited anthology of critical essays encompassing contemporary practices, issues and methods, prominent figures, and historical contexts in the domain of one-person theater and performance. Research scholars and academics interested in the area are welcome to contribute to the proposed volume.

Dickens and Empathy

updated: 
Sunday, September 5, 2021 - 10:00am
The Dickens Society
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 29, 2021

NeMLA 2022

CFP: "Dickens and Empathy"

Dates and Location: March 10-13, 2022  at the 53rd Annual NeMLA Convention in Baltimore, Maryland, hosted by Johns Hopkins University at the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront.

Decentering the White Male Gaze: Inclusivity and Diverse Voices in Beowulf Studies (NeMLA 2022)

updated: 
Sunday, June 27, 2021 - 12:40pm
Richard Fahey - NeMLA 2022
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 25, 2021

Beowulf studies has traditionally been the domain of white male scholars who have historically dominated both the scholarship and translations of the poem. This session seeks to decenter the white male gaze and invites novel perspectives from often marginalized voices in the field to contribute to the many ongoing academic conversations focused on Beowulf.

Fan Fiction and Performance in the Age of COVID

updated: 
Saturday, September 11, 2021 - 2:10pm
Kaitlin Tonti/Seton Hall University
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, September 25, 2021

While the Covid pandemic left many feeling isolated, from tragedy has emerged a new surge in modes of fan interaction and fan fiction that further challenge who, what, and how “canon” is determined in fictional worlds that have long since been closed by the authors and script writers.

Call for Papers, 53rd Annual NeMLA Convention

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 2:50pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

The 53rd Northeast Modern Language Association Convention will take place March 10 to 13, 2022, in Baltimore, MD. We are delighted to announce that Professor Judith Butler will be our 2022 keynote! And Valeria Luiselli, author of the prize-winning Lost Children Archive (the 2022 novel for “NeMLA Reads Together”), will give our opening address. Please submit abstracts at https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/CFP by September 30, 2021. The conference will be sponsored and hosted by Johns Hopkins University in collaboration with NeMLA’s administrative host institution, the University at Buffalo. For more information, please visit buffalo.edu/nemla/convention.html.

53rd Annual Convention of NeMLA: Other Times in Neo-slave Novels Panel

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 2:50pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

This panel , presenting at the 53rd Annual Convention of the Northeast Modern Language Association (March 10-13, Baltimore, MD), is entitled "Other Times in Neo-slave Novels: Anachronisms, Alternate Timelines, Parallel Universes, and More." Read below for the panel abstract.

Monstrous Machines, Queer Bodies & Haunted Technocultures in the American South

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:12pm
Elizabeth Finnegan, NeMLA 2022 Panel
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Despite persistent conceptions of the American South as pastoral, Modern and Postmodern Southern literatures have just as persistently grappled with the significance of modernity, consumerism, and technology. David A. Davis demonstrates how Southern modernism emerged from the disruptions that modernity introduced into the region by World War I. Rapid technological change can transform our connections to our own bodies and to others; and these transformations have profoundly animated Southern literatures.

NeMLA Roundtable: Genre of the Sketch in Long 19-century American Literature

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:12pm
Northeast Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

As one of the most versatile genres in long 19th Century American literature, the sketch appears in a variety of forms, including short stories, parts of longer novels, essays, biographies, brief plays, poetry, and more. What characteristics, if any, unite this breathtakingly diverse genre? Without a common theme or style, sketches change radically over time and between authors. Some sketch writers endeavor to render characters, scenes, or events from real life, like Louisa May Alcott when she recounts her experiences as a Civil War nurse in Hospital Sketches. Similarly, regionalist writers such as Francis Parkman, George Washington Cable, or Bret Harte present impressions of people and places.

Seeking chapters on Music & Deviance

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 2:59pm
Sylvia M DeSantis/Cambridge Scholars Publishing
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 31, 2021

Fumbling Towards Ecstasy: The Intersectionality of Music and Deviance Collection
Editor:Sylvia M DeSantis

This volume will explore the avenues through which 20th century musicians, and their enthused audiences, created necessarily deviant cultural movements. From the optimism engendered by the Big BandEra to socially justice-mindedGrunge in the ‘90s, musicians have used their stage power to resist, reward, and recreate long-standing cultural codes.

https://www.cambridgescholars.com/uploads/Fumbling%20Towards%20Ecstasy.pdf

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