/06
/27

displaying 1 - 6 of 6

Medieval in Popular Culture Sponsored Sessions for MAPACA 2021 (7/15/21; virtual 11/10-13/21)

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 2:04pm
Michael A Torregrossa / Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, July 15, 2021

Medieval in Popular Culture Sponsored Sessions for MAPACA 2021

Panels to run under the Medieval & Renaissance Area

2021 Annual Meeting of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association

Virtual Event, 10-13 November 2021

 

The Association for the Advancement of Scholarship and Teaching of the Medieval in Popular Culture seeks paper proposals related to the following three topics for inclusion in the Medieval & Renaissance Area sessions at the 2021 Annual Meeting of the Mid-Atlantic Popular & American Culture Association.

Julien Gracq: un écrivain géographe

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 2:03pm
NEMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Julien Gracq : un écrivain géographe/ Julien Gracq : un écrivain géographe (NEMLA MARS 2022, Baltimore, USA)

JOSEPH CONRAD NETWORKED WITHIN THE CLASSROOM AND WITHOUT

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 2:03pm
South Atlantic Modern Language Association
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, July 15, 2021

JOSEPH CONRAD NETWORKED WITHIN THE CLASSROOM AND WITHOUT

JOSEPH CONRAD SOCIETY OF AMERICA

 

Imaging Peace: Care-full Non-violence in Contemporary Sci-fi Narratives (Panel)

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 2:03pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

In literature and popular culture, the non-violent approach is vastly underrepresented as a viable philosophy. This is problematic because the stories we tell shape the imaginary we live out of. Part of the reason the pacifist position seems so untenable is precisely because it remains so unimagined. One thinks of the so-called canon with its repertoire of violent heroes: Homer, Shakespeare, Milton, Arthurian legend. Even today’s popular “canon” features heroes who consistently solve problems through violence: the Marvel Cinematic Universe, DC Comics’ films, the John Wick series, and the classic, decade-spanning Alien franchise. The myth of redemptive violence continues unabated.

Representations of Mental Health and Trauma Care in the Marvel Cinematic Universe

updated: 
Monday, June 28, 2021 - 2:03pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

With a growing social consciousness in the contemporary milieu, even large corporations such as Disney have begun to take an activist turn. Of late, Marvel has been especially sensitive to ongoing issues regarding race and gender. This is particularly evident in its latest incarnations available through Disney +: Wandavision and Falcon and the Winter Solider. Accompanying this messaging has also been a positive representation of mental health care and the effects of individual and collective trauma. These are not superheroes who take a beating and walk away unscathed; these are highly developed and nuanced characters whose arcs take shape over several different films and multiple episodes.