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Essays on Police and Policing in 21st Century Film and Television

updated: 
Wednesday, August 18, 2021 - 10:41am
University of Southern Queensland
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 15, 2021

CALL FOR PAPERS: Essays on Police and Policing in 21st Century Film and Television

The Black Lives Matter movement, the trial and conviction of Derek Chauvin,  calls to defund the police, the prominence in the media of killer police such as Joseph James DeAngelo are recent manifestations of intense and even unprecedented levels of media attention on policing at interlocking points of race, inequality, social justice and political agendas.  Equally, exciting cross-disciplinary engagement between fields of justice studies, criminology, cultural studies and popular culture are increasingly opening up.

NeMLA 2022 panel: Dance as Site-ation: Adapting Literature, Film, Media, Place, and Performance (NeMLA 2022)

updated: 
Wednesday, August 18, 2021 - 10:41am
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Dancing, perhaps most famously of the Tik Tok variety, has helped many cope and adapt to the past year’s pandemic, making people feel connected in an almost choreographed way. Not only infiltrating certain web sites, site-specific dance—choreographed work inspired by a specific space or place—is becoming increasingly relevant, especially in environmental terms. Recent projects such as Karole Armitage’s “On the Nature of Things” or Jody Sperling’s “Polar Rhythms” have taken nature, and more specifically climate change and other environmental issues, as their source of inspiration. A transformative art, dance offers the possibility of intimate connection and even continuous metamorphosis.

NeMLA 2022 Panel -- Care, Knowledge, and Subjectivity: Foucault’s Epimeleia

updated: 
Tuesday, October 5, 2021 - 2:28pm
Marina Malli / SUNY Binghamton
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 15, 2021

**Deadline extended**

This panel seeks to explore the contemporary uses of the Greek “care” or epimeleia particularly in ways enabled by Michel Foucault’s analysis of the notion connecting to (self)knowledge, subjectivity, and mode of life.