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Suicide and Popular Culture

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:55pm
Dr. Mike Alvarez/University of New Hampshire
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 15, 2021

According to the World Health Organization, more than 700,000 people die by suicide every year; one in 100 global deaths is by suicide. In the U.S., the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported 45,000 deaths by suicide (14.2 per 100,000) for the year 2020, representing a 30 percent increase over a 20-year period. Suicide is the eleventh leading cause of death in the U.S., and among persons between the ages of 10 to 34, it is the second leading cause. Women are more likely than men to attempt suicide, but men are three to four times more likely than women to die by suicide. In short, suicide is an intractable public and global health issue that has shown few signs of abating.

Locations and Landscapes in Weird and Horror Fiction

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:54pm
Northeastern Modern Language Association (nemla)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Landscapes, scenery, architecture, and locations are integral to the study of horror in fiction-- and yet, one might point out that they rarely recieve as much emphasis or attention as monsters that live within them. This panel is for these forgotten landscapes of horror and "weird" fiction--a place to observe and recognize the importance or triteness of the haunted house trope, the mysterious ineffability of Lovecraftian underwater temples, or the aged spirituality of Dracula's castle. This panel seeks to turn the paradigm of antagonist-focused readings of texts on its head, and start understanding place and location itself as a tangible and critical piece in the inculcation of horror.

INCS 2022: Print-Manuscript Layers in the Nineteenth-Century Archive

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:54pm
Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, October 1, 2021

Archival studies and print histories reveal surprising and complex interactions between manuscript and print in the nineteenth century, and justify continued attention to the manuscript sources that lay beneath the surface of some print, or to the annotations and revisions layered on top of others. The rich discourse surrounding these two mediums can help us scrutinize the competing terms that oftentimes frame them (that is, that print signifies professional, public, and masculine writing while manuscript signifies amateur, private, and feminine writing).

Germany and the African Diaspora

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:54pm
Northeast Modern Languages Association annual convention
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Why Germany? What relation does Germany, a country, have with the African continent? The relationship between African countries and Germany dates back to the seventeenth century, long before the Berlin conference of 1884 under Otto von Bismarck—itself a historical turning-point in German colonial politics. The meeting resulted in the scramble for and partition of Africa by European nations like France, Germany, Spain, Portugal, and Great Britain. The nineteenth-century saw an explosion of adventurous trading enterprises that pushed Bismarck to start a more official, state-supported form of colonialism and ultimately to the Berlin Conference.

NeMLA 2022 - Living Urban Ruins in Contemporary Latin American Literature, Film, and Media

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:54pm
Alexander Tough / University of Pittsburgh
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

The climate crisis, the economic crisis, the refugee crisis, and the COVID-19 pandemic has called to the forefront the experience of contemporary beings which forces us to re-evaluate the place of the human in the current world, calling into question the crisis of the universal mode of man and human exceptionalism. Such a displacement in how we think about the human experience also forces us to re-think the city as a whole and what it wants to forget, in particular urban ruins. Is it still beneficial to think of urban ruins as dead, as just relics of a bygone age of national development, or just as modern flops that merge with the surrounding urban fabric? Or are they alive?

NeMLA 2022- Forgotten Genocides

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:54pm
NeMLA
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

The tern Genocide was coined by Raphael Lemkin in 1944, in a context heavily influenced by the events of the Jewish Holocaust. The parameters of Genocide, and its legal consequences were gathered in the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide that recognizes that the following are factors that take place in a genocide:

-Killing members of the group

-Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group

-Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring physical destruction in whole or in part

-Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group

-Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group

The New Ray Bradbury Review first online issue

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:54pm
Dr Phil Nichols/Center for Ray Bradbury Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

The long-established New Ray Bradbury Review is seeking papers for its first online issue. As well as continuing to encourage new scholarship on any aspect of the works and life of American author Ray Bradbury (1920-2012), for this issue we also specifically invite articles on the topic of “the importance of literacy”. Submissions may connect Bradbury to this topic, or discuss the topic independently of Bradbury.

We welcome submissions from researchers, educators and creative practitioners in any relevant discipline. Here is a non-exhaustive list of possible subjects for articles, but we would welcome alternative approaches and suggestions:

International Bilingual Webinar on Tribal Lifestyle: Literature-Culture-Anthropology-Linguistics (IBWTL-2)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:54pm
International Bilingual Journal of Culture, Anthropology and Linguistics (IBJCAL), eISSN: 2582-4716
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 30, 2021

Call for Papers (CfP) to the আন্তর্জাতিক দ্বিভাষিক ওয়েবিনার আদিবাসী জীবনযাত্রা : সাহিত্য-সংস্কৃতি-নৃবিজ্ঞান-ভাষাবিজ্ঞান/ International Bilingual Webinar on Tribal Lifestyle: Literature-Culture-Anthropology-Linguistics (IBWTL-2)

Scholarly Paper Presentation Registration link:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSe9-ZmECYPxIsO067_v89hMUyoCYRvY...

Senses in the City (Panel)

updated: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021 - 2:54pm
Arianna Fognani
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Dear Colleagues,

please consider submitting an abstract to the following roundtable at the NeMLA's 53rd annual convention in Baltimore, MD (U.S.) from March 10 to 13, 2022.

FORMAT: Panel. 3-4 participants, reading a formal paper of 15-20 minutes (2500-3000 words) as set by the chair, followed by Q&A.