Collective Practices of Care During the Pandemic (Seminar)

deadline for submissions: 
September 30, 2021
full name / name of organization: 
Cynthia Melendez (New York University) Sandra Bonomini (Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro)
contact email: 

Si pensamos el sujeto de la política y el sujeto de la revolución como un sujeto constitutivamente vulnerable, entonces la revolución es completamente distinta. Ya no es un proyecto de poder, es un proyecto de cuidado"- Paul B. Preciado

Through the acknowledgement of collective care and vulnerability as revolutionary practices during the current COVID-19 pandemic, this session seeks to review different forms and performatic activist and feminist gestures that have occurred during the pandemic and the quarantine. As the reconfiguration of power through the arts and performance has always meant putting the body to visibilize and denounce dominant and heteropatriarcal systems that have continued operating during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this context, we are seeking to share the work of artists and activists that, through performance and gestures, have denounced violence against non-normative bodies, racism, and different types of social inequality. In here, we hope to answer; how does care translate into performatic actions in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic? How do we make space for collective mourning? In which ways marginalized and non- normative bodies have become and remained as political subjects during the sanitary crisis? What actions have surfaced from the body that have allowed us to imagine new forms of collective care?

We will accept works in Spanish, Portuguese and English as well as different forms of presentations that will not necessarily mean an academic paper.

By acknowledging collective care and vulnerability as revolutionary practices during COVID-19, this session reviews different forms and performatic activist and feminist gestures that have occurred during the pandemic and the quarantine. How does care translate into performatic actions in the context of COVID-19? How do we make space for collective mourning? In which ways have marginalized and non-normative bodies become and remained political subjects?