"Now the arts connect": Tom Phillips’ Constellations

deadline for submissions: 
January 31, 2022
full name / name of organization: 
University of Liège
contact email: 

 

"Now the arts connect":

Tom Phillips’ Constellations

 

The year 2016 was a very special one for English artist Tom Phillips. It was in October of that year that the final version of A Humument was published, a work unlike any other which occupied fifty years of the life of its author since its inception in 1966.

A found text artist’s book, A Humument consists in a methodical rewriting of a little-known Victorian novel, A Human Document (1892), written by a certain William H. Mallock. Page after page, Phillips obliterates the source material using various iconic elements (pencil drawings, paintings, photographic collages, etc.) and leaves only a few words floating around which he links together by means of “rivulets”. According to Phillips himself, these few words left uncovered are intended to lay the foundations for a “sister story” (p. 7) through which the artist seeks to make his own voice heard.

A Humument undoubtedly stands out as a cardinal achievement in the field of contemporary art. Because of its extreme complexity and singularity, it has proved challenging, if not daunting to most critics, which is arguably why it has so far elicited a rather modest number of readings and analyses.

The aim of this conference is to fill this relative void and study Tom Phillips’ singular poetic art as it unfolds not only within the framework of A Humument, but also in other related and too often neglected works (e.g., Dante's Inferno [1983] and Irma. An Opera [2014]).

 

Our reflections will develop along several directions.

 

"now the arts connect"

Highlighted on the cover of the final version of A Humument, this apparently simple statement exemplifies Tom Phillips’ ars poetica. The author goes as far as considering that this junction between the arts constitutes his Muse by excellence (p. 128: “My little muse was connect connect”). It is true that Phillips’ work is orchestrated through and through from an interartistic perspective, both on a verbal and an iconic level. This conference thus seeks to address its complex relationships not only with poetry, painting, sculpture, cinema, photography, and music, but also with more « minor » modes of representations such as the mosaic, graffiti, postcards, illuminations, etc. Specific case studies will be more specifically geared towards an understanding of how A Humument contributes to reactivating, in the field of contemporary art, the idea of a ​​Gesamtkunstwerk (a term that Phillips himself has used to characterize his work). Proposals relating to other works by Phillips displaying a similar modus operandi (notably his artist’s books [Tom Phillips - Artist's books] and his musical works [Six of Hearts: Songs for Mary Wiegold (1991) http://www.tomphillips.co.uk/works/music-scores/item/89-six-of-hearts]) are also strongly welcome. We start from the principle that A Humument and the author’s more peripheral works form a vast constellation and that they can only shed light on each other within a general scheme which is also based on interconnection.

 

Words and Pictures

Each page of A Humument, but also of Dante's Inferno (1983) and Irma (2014) offers itself both as a poem and as a small painting. In constantly changing forms, it thus poses the thorny question of the relationships woven between the verbal and the iconic. How can we describe these interactions? Do they rely on congruence or, conversely, do they operate in the mode of tension, or even denial or conflict? Do we start by looking at or by reading a given page? In other words, how does the author program our reading strategies in the twists and turns of the page?

 

Thematic approaches

Taken as a whole, Phillips’s work cultivates a whole series of recursive, even obsessive themes, sometimes in explicit, sometimes in more hidden fashions. It would be particularly interesting to approach this oeuvre according to well-defined thematic or isotopic markers. The following themes, among others, could be the subject of in-depth analyses: medicine, sexuality, memory, confinement, the art world and its vicissitudes, self-reflection, etc.

 

A Multifaceted Oeuvre

A more circumscribed issue could be integrated into our work: as we know, unlike Dante's Inferno and Irma, A Humument has known six successive editions, respectively in 1980, 1987, 1997, 2005, 2012 and 2016. Each of them offers variations affecting around 15% of the book. In keeping with Phillips’ rule of thumb, each page of the original novel has been “treated” twice in this way, which begs for a comparative reading of the two versions. How does the final version differ from the original version? What is the nature and orientation of the modifications made to the pages concerned (exacerbation, repentance, deepening, antagonism, etc.)? On a methodological level, how can a genetic approach to the work be useful and enlightening?

 

Off the Book

As an artist's book, A Humument has also been exhibited on several occasions, as was the case in Boston and New York in the course of 2015. By entering art galleries and museums, the book breaks with its own physical limits and displays itself under the eyes of visitors, its various pages framed and more often than not juxtaposed to each other. How does this mode of exhibition affect our understanding of the work? What about the actual status of the exhibited page? From a more general perspective, how can we approach A Humument when it is exposed off the book? Similar questions also arise regarding the digital versions of A Humument (iPad and iPhone applications saw the light in the early 2010s, a USB key in 2013).

 

Openings

Beyond internal analyses, it would also seem opportune to open up the game and question the status occupied by Phillips’s work in the field of contemporary art, which would amount to considering it in connection with the projects of other « foundist » artists working with already existing works (e.g., found text but also, in the audiovisual field, the cinema of found footage, to cite just two examples among others).

 

Please send your proposals in English or French (300 words max.) along with a short bio-bibliographical note (75 words max.) to:

jbawin@uliege.be

Livio.Belloi@uliege.be

mdelville@uliege.be

 

Deadline: January 31, 2022

 

Organizing Team

 

Julie Bawin (Université de Liège, UR Art, Archéologie et Patrimoine)

Livio Belloï (Université de Liège, UR Traverses)

Michel Delville (Université de Liège, UR Traverses)

 

Scientific Committee

Jan Baetens (KU Leuven)

Julie Bawin (Université de Liège)

Livio Belloï (Université de Liège)

Jean-Pierre Bertrand (Université de Liège)

David Caplan (Ohio Wesleyan University)

Mary Ann Caws (City University of New York)

Michel Delville (Université de Liège)

Pascal Durand (Université de Liège)

Fabrice Leroy (University of Louisiana at Lafayette)

Enrico Lunghi (Université de Luxembourg)

Alexander Streitberger (Université Catholique de Louvain)

 

Université de Liège

Colloque international

27-29 avril 2022

 

« now the arts connect » :

les constellations de Tom Phillips

 

Pour l’artiste anglais Tom Phillips, l’année 2016 devait sans conteste s’imprégner d’une saveur toute particulière. C’est au mois d’octobre de cette année-là, en effet, que fut publiée la version finale de A Humument, une œuvre à nulle autre pareille qui aura accaparé cinquante années de la vie de son auteur (à partir de 1966).

Livre d’artiste relevant du found text, A Humument consiste en la réécriture méthodique d’un roman victorien très méconnu, à savoir A Human Document (1892), ouvrage dû à la plume d’un certain William H. Mallock. Page après page, Phillips oblitère le matériau-source à l’aide de divers éléments iconiques (crayonnages, dessins, peinture, collages photographiques, etc.) et n’y laisse surnager que quelques mots qu’il relie entre eux à l’aide de « ruisselets » (« rivulets »). De l’aveu même de Phillips, ces quelques mots laissés à découvert se destinent à jeter les fondements d’une « histoire sœur » (p. 7) au travers de laquelle l’artiste cherche à faire entendre sa propre voix.

A Humument constitue à n’en pas douter une œuvre cardinale et hautement révélatrice dans le champ de l’art contemporain. Par l’extrême complexité dont elle se fait le lieu, une telle œuvre a cependant de quoi rebuter et peut-être même effaroucher. C’est sans doute la raison pour laquelle A Humument n’a encore suscité qu’un nombre assez restreint de commentaires et d’analyses.

Le présent colloque se donne pour ambition de combler ce vide relatif. Il s’agira donc d’étudier l’art poétique si singulier de Tom Phillips tel qu’il se déploie, non seulement dans le cadre de A Humument, mais aussi dans les œuvres connexes et trop souvent négligées du même auteur (comme Dante’s Inferno [1983] et Irma. An Opera [2014]).  

 

Nos réflexions se développeront selon plusieurs axes.

 

« now the arts connect »

Mis en exergue sur la couverture de la version finale de A Humument, cet énoncé, tout simple en apparence, synthétise exemplairement l’art poétique de Tom Phillips. L’auteur considère même que cette jonction entre les arts constitue, par excellence, sa Muse (p. 128 : « My little muse was connect connect »). Il est vrai que l’œuvre de Phillips s’orchestre de part en part sur le mode du brassage des arts, tant au registre verbal qu’au registre iconique. Aussi souhaiterions-nous, dans le cadre du colloque, que soient abordée la question des rapports complexes que les travaux de Phillips entretiennent avec la poésie, la peinture, la sculpture, le cinéma, la photographie, la musique, mais aussi avec des modes de représentation tenus pour mineurs comme la mosaïque, le graffiti, la carte postale, l’enluminure, etc. Des études de cas précises viseront notamment à déterminer en quoi A Humument contribue à réactiver, dans le champ de l’art contemporain, l’idée de Gesamtkunstwerk (terme que Phillips lui-même emploie d’ailleurs volontiers pour caractériser son travail). Les propositions de communication portant sur d’autres œuvres de Phillips qui sollicitent un modus operandi analogue (notamment ses artists’ books [Tom Phillips - Artist's books] et ses œuvres musicales [Six of Hearts: Songs for Mary Wiegold (1991) http://www.tomphillips.co.uk/works/music-scores/item/89-six-of-hearts]) sont de même vivement encouragées. Nous partons en effet du principe que A Humument et les œuvres plus périphériques de l’auteur forment une ample constellation et qu’elles ne peuvent que s’éclairer les unes les autres dans un schéma général lui aussi fondé sur l’interconnexion.

 

Mots et images

Chaque page de A Humument, mais aussi de Dante’s Inferno (1983) et d’Irma (2014)s’offre à la fois comme un poème et comme un tableautin. Chacune d’entre elles pose dès lors, sous des espèces constamment renouvelées, l’épineuse question des rapports tissés entre le verbal et l’iconique. Comment déterminer ces interactions ? Misent-elles sur la congruence ou, à l’inverse, s’opèrent-elles sur le mode de la tension, voire de la dénégation ou du conflit ? Devant telle page élaborée par Phillips, s’agit-il d’abord de regarder ou de lire ? En d’autres termes, comment l’auteur programme-t-il l’activité et les trajets de son lecteur/contemplateur dans les méandres de la page ?

 

Approches thématiques

Envisagée dans son ensemble, l’œuvre de Phillips cultive toute une série de thèmes récursifs, voire obsessionnels, tantôt affichés comme tels, tantôt plus secrets. Il serait particulièrement intéressant de traverser cette œuvre en fonction de balises thématiques ou isotopiques bien définies. Les thèmes suivants pourraient, parmi d’autres, faire l’objet d’analyses approfondies : la médecine, la sexualité, la mémoire, la claustration, le monde de l’art et ses vicissitudes, le retour sur soi, etc.  

 

Une œuvre à plusieurs visages

Une question plus circonscrite pourrait s’intégrer à nos travaux : contrairement à Dante’s Inferno et à Irma, A Humument a connu, on le sait, six éditions successives, respectivement en 1980, 1987, 1997, 2005, 2012 et 2016. Chacune d’elles propose des variations affectant environ 15% des planches qui composent l’ouvrage. Conformément à la règle que Phillips s’est donné, chaque page du roman originel a de la sorte été « traitée » à deux reprises, tant et si bien que s’affirme, entre les deux versions, la nécessité d’une lecture comparée. En quoi la version définitive se démarque-t-elle de la version originelle ? Dans quels sens vont les modifications apportées aux pages concernées (exacerbation, repentir, approfondissement, antagonisme, etc.) ? Sur un plan méthodologique, en quoi une approche génétique de l’œuvre peut-elle s’avérer utile et éclairante ?

 

Hors-livre

Livre d’artiste, A Humument a également en propre de s’exposer occasionnellement, comme ce fut notamment le cas à Boston et à New York dans le courant de l’année 2015. Investissant les galeries d’art et les musées, le livre rompt par là même avec ses limites physiques et en vient à étaler ses différentes planches, encadrées et le plus souvent juxtaposées les unes aux autres, sous les yeux des visiteurs. En quoi ce mode d’exposition affecte-t-il notre appréhension de l’œuvre ? Qu’en est-il du statut même de la page ainsi exposée ? Dans une perspective plus générale, comment approcher ce livre dès lors qu’il est précisément exposé hors-livre ? Des questions du même ordre se posent évidemment quant aux versions numériques de A Humument (application pour IPad et IPhone au début des années 2010, clé USB en 2013).

 

Ouvertures

Au-delà des analyses internes, il nous semblerait également opportun d’ouvrir le jeu et d’interroger le statut que l’œuvre de Phillips occupe dans le champ de l’art contemporain. Il s’agirait ainsi de penser le travail de l’artiste anglais avec les projets esthétiques d’autres artistes qui procèdent eux aussi par reprise et détournement d’œuvres préexistantes (found text mais aussi, dans le domaine audiovisuel, cinéma de found footage, pour ne prendre que deux exemples parmi d’autres).

 

Accompagnées d’une brève notice biobibliographique (75 mots maximum), les propositions de communication, rédigées en français ou en anglais, ne devront pas dépasser les 300 mots. Elles seront envoyées aux trois adresses électroniques suivantes :

 

jbawin@uliege.be

Livio.Belloi@uliege.be

mdelville@uliege.be

 

Date-limite de soumission : le 31 janvier 2022.

 

Comité organisateur

 

Julie Bawin (Université de Liège, UR Art, Archéologie et Patrimoine)

Livio Belloï (Université de Liège, UR Traverses)

Michel Delville (Université de Liège, UR Traverses)

 

Comité scientifique

 

Jan Baetens (KU Leuven)

Julie Bawin (Université de Liège)

Livio Belloï (Université de Liège)

Jean-Pierre Bertrand (Université de Liège)

David Caplan (Ohio Wesleyan University)

Mary Ann Caws (City University of New York)

Michel Delville (Université de Liège)

Pascal Durand (Université de Liège)

Fabrice Leroy (University of Louisiana at Lafayette)

Enrico Lunghi (Université de Luxembourg)

Alexander Streitberger (Université Catholique de Louvain)