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CFP: Audience Reception, Diversity, & Cancel Culture on TV

updated: 
Monday, December 13, 2021 - 8:01pm
Jonina Anderson-Lopez/University of South Florida
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 10, 2022

We have been invited by McFarland to expand a recent article on diversity and cancel culture in television (Anderson-Lopez et al., 2021) for a book proposal further exploring the phenomenon of audience sway over television content. Please see the CFP below and feel free to reach out to us with questions. We hope to turn around the book proposal to McFarland in a timely manner, so please note the January 10, 2022, deadline for 300-500 word chapter proposals. We look forward to reading your submissions and collaborating on this edited collection!

Sincerely,

Infrastructure and Aesthetics in the Global South (ASLE 2022)

updated: 
Thursday, December 30, 2021 - 11:08am
Rebecca Oh / ASLE 2022 (Association for the Study of Literature and Environment)
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, February 11, 2022

This session seeks papers that attend to the affordances of infrastructure for aesthetics and of aesthetics for infrastructure in postcolonial/global South literature. We aim to explore infrastructure's own aesthetic capacities, the ways in which built forms and their materials produce specific aesthetic effects and social uses, or the ways in which infrastructure makes aesthetic perception available to social practice. In turn we are interested in the way aesthetic qualities like form, genre, reception, plot, narrative, or medium are themselves infrastructural and shape encounters with infrastructure.

How Things Will Go: Genre and Infrastructure in the Environmental Humanities (ASAP/13)

updated: 
Sunday, January 9, 2022 - 5:48pm
Rebecca Oh, ASAP/13 (Association for the Study of the Arts of the Present)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, February 5, 2022

Genre and infrastructure are both structuring forms that shape how things will go. Generic narrative worlds shape emplotment, likely or unlikely events, types of characters, in/appropriate actions, and readerly expectations; genre organizes both narrative elements and the relations between them by creating frames and edges through which to interpret the world. Likewise, infrastructures organize things and the relations between them, whether by enabling or blocking the movement of people and objects. They constrain or facilitate uses and perceptions. This seminar will consider the affordances of genre for infrastructure and of infrastructure for genre, asking how these structuring forms are being taken up in the environmental humanities.

English Literature summer program for undergraduates of diverse backgrounds

updated: 
Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 4:02pm
Rutgers English Diversity Institute (REDI)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, February 11, 2021

The Rutgers English Diversity Institute (REDI) is now approaching its fourteenth year! This program is designed to encourage students from diverse cultural, economic, and ethnic backgrounds to consider graduate study in Literatures in English.

In Search of Epistemic Justice: A Tentative Cartography

updated: 
Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 3:54pm
In Search of Epistemic Justice International Seminar
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, December 31, 2021

IN SEARCH OF EPISTEMIC JUSTICE: A TENTATIVE CARTOGRAPHY

Call for Applications

This seminar aims to explore epistemic inequality and epistemic injustice in a variety of cultural, historical and geopolitical contexts, as well as within the academy. When discussing epistemic inequality or injustice we refer to the marginalization and de-legitimation of ways of knowing and methods of knowledge production and dissemination that stem from non-dominant cultural locations, identities and positionalities.

Special Issue of The Hemingway Review on Hemingway, Blackness, and Whiteness

updated: 
Friday, May 20, 2022 - 12:33pm
The Hemingway Review
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, August 29, 2022

 

This special issue of The Hemingway Review aims to deepen the conversation about Hemingway, Blackness, and Whiteness. Recognizing Hemingway was taught and expected to perform White Supremacy and Privilege, we call on scholars to demonstrate ways to identify and make meaning of racism and anti-racism in Hemingway’s work. What can we learn from Hemingway about the performance of Whiteness and what use is that knowledge? How have Black writers engaged Hemingway, both in his lifetime and later? What questions about Blackness and Whiteness in the United States should we be asking of Hemingway’s public persona, Hemingway’s writing, and our teaching of both?

 

CfS: The Janovics Center Award for Outstanding Humanities Research in Transnational Film and Theatre Studies

updated: 
Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 11:28am
Janovics Center for Screen and Performing Arts Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, February 15, 2022

The Janovics Center for Screen and Performing Arts Studies and the Faculty of Theatre and Film at Babes-Bolyai University invite submissions for their annual award for outstanding humanities research in transnational film and theatre studies. The award will be offered to contributions in the fields of film or theatre studies. The award consists of an invitation to give a talk at the Center and an honorarium. 

What is awarded?

“Beating My Head Against the Wall “: Legitimacy, Authority, and the Canon in American Music and Dance (19th-21st Centuries)

updated: 
Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 11:28am
AFEA
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, February 7, 2022

At first, America was convinced of its utter illegitimacy as a purveyor of “art” music. In the 19th century, as musical life developed in the United States, and while large American cities built concert halls to house their newly-formed symphony orchestras, the repertoire and the most popular artists remained overwhelmingly European: thus, the Swedish soprano Jenny Lind (1820-1887) – a friend of Felix Mendelssohn, a collaborator of Giuseppe Verdi, and a key figure of the Bach Renaissance – made a deep impression when she toured the country in 1852-2.

Update_TACMRS 2022 Call for Papers

updated: 
Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 11:27am
Taiwan Association of Classical, Medieval, and Renaissance Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, January 10, 2022

The Sixteenth International Conference of the Taiwan Association of Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Studies (TACMRS)

 

21–22 October 2022 Tamkang University New Taipei City, Taiwan

 

UPDATE: This conference will be a hybrid conference, with both in-person and virtual presentations.

 

Call for Papers

 

Engaging the Audience: From Antiquity to the Renaissance

 

 

The Shapes of Adaptation

updated: 
Wednesday, December 8, 2021 - 4:28pm
International Doctoral Conference in Linguistic, Philological, and Literary Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Tuesday, February 15, 2022
  • Venue: Padua (Italy);
  • 5-6 May, 2022 (dual mode - in presence and online)

The International Doctoral Conference in Linguistic, Philological and Literary Studies of the University of Padua (Italy), now in its fourth edition, joins this year the rich range of different initiatives and projects aimed at celebrating the 800th anniversary of the foundation of the University of Padua. The aim of the Conference is to provide a fruitful opportunity for interdisciplinary exchange and discussion among young scholars on the themes of adaptation and non-adaptation.

Poetry and/as Criticism

updated: 
Wednesday, December 8, 2021 - 4:28pm
Maynooth University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, March 21, 2022

 

   

 

 

 

                AS

POETRY         CRITICISM

              AND

 

 

One day symposium, Maynooth University, 21st March 2022.

Call for papers

 

How might we understand the at times fraught, at times generative relationship between poetry and criticism? 

 

Women in World(-)Literature

updated: 
Thursday, January 6, 2022 - 8:57am
English and Comparative Literary Studies, The University of Warwick
deadline for submissions: 
Sunday, January 30, 2022

Abstract deadline:

30th January 2022

Email to:

 womeninworldlitconference@gmail.com

Conference date: 

Wednesday 22nd June 2022.

Please note that this is a trans-inclusive event.

 

 

“A single but radically uneven world-system; a singular modernity, combined and uneven; and a literature that variously registers this combined unevenness in both its form and its content to reveal itself as, properly speaking, world-literature…”

Seminar at the ESSE 2022 Conference, Mainz, Germany

updated: 
Saturday, February 5, 2022 - 6:18am
European Society for the Study of English (ESSE)
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, February 28, 2022

Women’s Writing and their Writings on Writing

The area of research delineated under the seminar Women Writers and their Writings on Writing is that of women novelists having inscribed their fictional and non-fictional contributions in English within the frame of postmodernism. Simultaneously using and abusing the canon, writers like Margaret Atwood, Antonia Susan Byatt, Ursula Le Guin, Doris Lessing, or Angela Carter, to name but a few, make their voices heard via metafiction, literary theory and criticism, newspaper articles, reviews, lectures and recorded/televised interviews – demarches which are quintessentially technical, therefore automatically/stereotypically associated with men.

Bridges and Borders: Crossings in Language and Culture

updated: 
Thursday, December 9, 2021 - 12:32am
Carnegie Mellon University English Graduate Student Colloquia
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, February 11, 2022

Bridges and Borders: Crossings in Language and Culture

A Graduate Student Virtual Conference presented by the Carnegie Mellon University Department of English Colloquia with Keynote Speaker Lisa Lowe

April 15th and 16th

 

“Caminante, no hay puentes, se hace puentes al andar.” 

“Voyager, there are no bridges, one builds them as one walks.”

Gloria Anzaldúa - This Bridge Called My Back

 

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