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Lee Child Symposium UEA (Friday 1st April 2022) *Updated Deadline*

updated: 
Friday, September 3, 2021 - 8:21am
University of East Anglia
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, October 13, 2021

The University of East Anglia, UK, is proud to announce an international symposium dedicated to the writing of Lee Child, a key figure in contemporary crime fiction, and creator of the world-renowned Jack Reacher series. Hosted by the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing and by the British Archive for Contemporary Writing (BACW), this symposium celebrates the official opening of the archive of Child’s papers held at UEA. It also marks the 25th anniversary of the publication of Killing Floor (1997), which introduced the inimitable Jack Reacher, whose fight for justice, on behalf of the vulnerable and oppressed, has become a series hallmark.

Call for chapters on Body & Embodiment: Social Scientific and Interdisciplinary Approaches

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:37pm
Jackie Hogan, Bradley University
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, September 20, 2021

Call for Chapter Proposals or Chapters:

Edited volume Consuming Bodies: Body Commodification and Embodiment in Late Capitalist Societies

 

Editors:

Jackie Hogan (Professor of Sociology and Anthropology, Bradley University)

Fae Chubin (Assistant Professor of Sociology, Bradley University)

Sarah Whetstone (Assistant Professor of Sociology, Bradley University)

 

LGBTQIA+ Fantastika Graphics: A Digital Symposium

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:36pm
Fantastika Journal
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, August 20, 2021

LGBTQIA+ Fantastika Graphics: A Digital Symposium November 20th, 2021 [Updated Dates]

“Fantastika” – a term appropriated from a range of Slavonic languages by John Clute – embraces the genres of Fantasy, Science Fiction, and Horror, but can also include Alternate History, Gothic, Steampunk, Young Adult Dystopic Fiction, or any other radically imaginative narrative space. Our goal is to bring together academics, independent researchers, creators, and audiences who share an interest in this diverse range of fields with the aim of opening up new dialogues, productive controversies, and critical collaborations.

Cambridge Companion to American Protest Literature

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:36pm
University of Central Lancashire
deadline for submissions: 
Wednesday, September 1, 2021

 

We are seeking contributors and proposals for chapters to be included in the forthcoming Cambridge Companion to American Protest Literature, newly commissioned by Cambridge University Press.

2021 Annual Thatcher Network Conference

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:36pm
The Thatcher Network
deadline for submissions: 
Monday, June 28, 2021

Supplementary Call For Papers

 

Our 2020 conference was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Most of our speakers from 2020 have agreed to present their papers this year, but unfortunately some speakers' circumstances have changed and they can no longer participate.

 

We are therefore seeking to fill some gaps in our programme. 

 

We invite submissions of 250-word abstracts (for papers lasting 15 minutes) on all aspects of Margaret Thatcher and Thatcherism. We especially welcome submissions from women.

 

Papers relating to Margaret Thatcher and the concept of citizenship or Margaret Thatcher and the constitution would be particularly pertinent to our programme.

 

Race and Identities in Latinx Representations in Literature and Film (NEMLA 2022)

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:36pm
José Lara / Bridgewater State University
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Most cultural representations of the Latinx community produced in the United States have historically reduced this population to stereotypes or caricatures. Nevertheless, there is a new wave of cultural phenomena (literature, films, tv series, etc.) that has not only challenged these exaggerated and erroneous representations but has also sought to breathe complexity into real Latinx subjectivities and experiences. This panel welcomes essays that discuss new forms and interpretations of the histories and traditions of the Latinx communities present in literature and film. We are particularly interested in works that delve into the intersections of race and identity in Latinx production and self/representation.

Un.sited: "Sites" of French Studies

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:36pm
Australian Society of French Studies
deadline for submissions: 
Friday, July 30, 2021

https://australiansocietyforfrenchstudies.com/2021/06/18/call-for-papers...

Australian Society for French Studies Conference 2021

8-10 December 2021

 

Un.sited: “Sites” in French Studies

Online conference

 

Hosted by the French Discipline, School of Language and Cultures, University of Queensland

We acknowledge the traditional owners of the lands on which the university stands.

 

Animal Heroes, Villains and Others: the Narrative Functions of Strange and Familiar Creatures in Film and Television

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:36pm
Dr. Karin Beeler and Dr. Stan Beeler
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, July 15, 2021

CALL FOR CHAPTERS /CFP for Edited Volume

 

Animal Heroes, Villains and Others: the Narrative Functions of Strange and Familiar Creatures in Film and Television

 

Deadline for Submission of Proposals: July 15, 2021

 

Name: Dr. Karin Beeler and Dr. Stan Beeler

 

Contact emails: Karin.Beeler@unbc.ca and Stan.Beeler@unbc.ca

 

LAST CALL: Dune, from Herbert to Villeneuve (PAMLA, roundtable, conducted remotely)

updated: 
Saturday, July 31, 2021 - 10:50am
Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association (Annual Convention, Las Vegas, November 12-15, 2021, https://pamla.ballastacademic.com/Home/S/18273)
deadline for submissions: 
Saturday, July 31, 2021

Frank Herbert’s Dune (1965) is as celebrated as it is because of its depth and complexity, of course. It’s also, however, presumably, because its storyline, and that of its two initial sequels, Dune Messiah (1969) and Children of Dune (1976), of a crusade led by a prophet with superhuman abilities and its legacy, resonated with readers awash in social and political turbulence. It’s not difficult to imagine, then, that adaptations have emerged at regular intervals for similar reasons, beginning with David Lynch’s Dune (1984), John Harrison’s Dune (2000) and Children of Dune (2003), and now Denis Villeneuve’s forthcoming Dune (2021).

Real and Imagined Readers, a session sponsored by the Society for Critical Exchange at NeMLA 2022

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:44pm
Scott DeShong
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

What determines the readership of a text or other medium, and how does such determination occur? Who are the imagined readers of a specific work, or a genre of literature or media, and how is this legible in textual features, modes of dissemination, implicit or explicit intentions of authors, or histories of reception? How do real readers encounter such assumptions or positionings and accept or resist them? Which works reach more homogeneous audiences, which garner multiple or intersecting ones, and how do audiences shift over time? Do readers have the power to choose their identities as readers? Abstracts for 15-20 minute papers: submit to https://www.cfplist.com/nemla/Home/login

NeMLA 2022 Panel: Ghostliness and Purgatorial Wastelands in Modernist Literature

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 4:29pm
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

53rd NeMLA Annual Convention - Baltimore, Maryland, 10-13 March, 2022

  

The theme of ghostliness is often present in modernist literature and boundaries between life and death are very often blurred. What can the recurrent invocation of spectrality say about modernism and modernists? How do modernist authors represent their characters who dwell a death in life (or a life in death)?

Rethinking the Brain Novel: Towards Experimental Representations of Fictional Consciousness (Panel)

updated: 
Monday, June 21, 2021 - 3:34pm
Mohamed Anis Ferchichi / University of Rhode Island
deadline for submissions: 
Thursday, September 30, 2021

Since the origins of the English novel, and the rise of philosophical materialism in the wake of Rene Descartes, David Hume, and John Locke, English fiction writers have been interested in capturing the neural activity of the brain through narrative style, form, and genre. In the same vain, in The Feeling of What Happens (1999), Antonio Damasio, having cited Hume and Descartes as precedents for contemporary neuroscience, contends that “consciousness may be produced within the three pounds of flesh we call brain” (28). Damasio’s comment translates a reductionism whereby the immaterial experience is reduced to the function of the neurons.

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