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[UPDATE] From Experiential to Expository: A Roundtable (NeMLA March 17-20, 2016; Deadline September 30, 2015)

updated: 
Thursday, July 23, 2015 - 7:06am
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
contact email: 

By extending the learning environment beyond the classroom's boundaries, undergraduate programs have stimulated lively pedagogical innovation across general education disciplines. The approach encourages rigorous critical thought via assignments that require students to think critically and to reflect actively on links between course materials, historical sites, and concrete social and cultural concerns. However, the popularity for the experiential, fed by administrative and parental enthusiasm, may hinder instructors and encumber students.

Rethinking the Neuronovel: Towards a Narrative Model of Cognition

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 11:16pm
full name / name of organization: 
Hillel Broder / CUNY Graduate Center / NeMLA
contact email: 

Marco Roth has recently suggested that we are living in the age of the neuronovel—a narrative form that narrates cognition in terms of neurochemistry, diagnosis, and heredity. Though recent narratives of amnesia, schizophrenia, and autism are often quick to identify their symptoms and types, the history of neurotypical and non-neurotypical minds in fiction is a long one. Instead of reading such fictions through the lens of biology, psychology, or neuroscience, however, how might we discover models of cognition that emerge from within narrative experiment itself?

Diagnosis Literature: Medical Narratives of the Nineteenth Century--NEMLA 2016 Hartford

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 10:53pm
full name / name of organization: 
Amanda Caleb/Misericordia University
contact email: 

This panel seeks to explore how medical narrative was used in nineteenth-century fiction and medical texts as a counterargument to the medical gaze, thereby rewriting the medical history of the period from the patient's prospective. The use of medical narrative as a counter-current to the profession's paternalism indicates the subversive nature of nineteenth-century literature and reinforces the value of storytelling and narrative within the "factual" world of medicine.

Your Papers are Due at 3:00; My Panic Attack is at 4:00: Mental Illness in the Academy

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 9:45pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)
contact email: 

In Mad at School, Margaret Price claims that "Persons with mental disabilities lack rhetoricity; we are rhetorically disabled." Our experience as academics with diagnosed mental disabilities bears witness to this silencing. While we advocate for our disabled students in powerful and vocal ways, we often find ourselves without voice, without power, without the language to articulate our own experiences to our colleagues, department chairs, deans, and to our students, the very same students we encourage to be honest and open in their own writing. We respectfully listen as students share their stories about mental illnesses and addictions; we make accommodations (even without ADA requirements); we refer them to support services.

One Sentence English Competition

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 8:00pm
full name / name of organization: 
Words in Place
contact email: 

"Words in Place," from the University of Waterloo's English Department, is announcing our first ever One Sentence English Contest!
(We're calling the contest OneSEC, because that's how long it will take you to submit the shortest academic application ever.)

The OneSEC prize is for the best single sentence in an academic essay in a peer-reviewed journal in 2014 by a scholar trained or nested in English. How is "best" defined? The judges are academics, so through peer review by a disparate group of scholars with competing priorities, naturally.* No affiliation with the University of Waterloo is required.

Dialectical Thinking in the Humanities

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 7:33pm
full name / name of organization: 
ACLA
contact email: 

This seminar will explore the uses and limits of dialectical thinking as a critical tool for contemporary humanistic inquiry. Engaging with a literary and philosophical tradition that is nothing else if not comparative, we argue for the persistent value in understanding textual oppositions, contradictions, and self-negations not as conceptual limitations, but as sites of productive restlessness.

One Hundred Years of Susan Glaspell's "Trifles" - NeMLA 2016 (Deadline, Sept. 30)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 7:31pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association - Hartford, CT - March 17-20, 2015

Susan Glaspell's one-act play, "Trifles," premiered in Provincetown in 1916, during an era of historic upheaval in American gender relations. That same year, Margaret Sanger opened the first birth control center in the United States and Jeanette Rankin became the first woman elected to the US House of Representatives. The Nineteenth Amendment, of course, would be passed within three years. In the intervening century, the position of women in American society has evolved dramatically – 2016 may see the election of the first woman president – and yet the depiction of gender relations portrayed in "Trifles" remains trenchantly familiar to twenty-first-century readers.

Sacred Troubling Topics in the Tanakh, New Testament, and Qur'an

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 6:47pm
full name / name of organization: 
American Comparative Literature Association
contact email: 

ORGANIZATION: American Comparative Literature Association

CONTACT: Roberta Sabbath at Sabbath@unlv.nevada.edu

CALL FOR PAPERS OPEN/CLOSE DATE ON ACLA WEBSITE--ACLA.ORG: September 1-23, 2015

ANNUAL CONFERENCE LOCATION, DATE: Harvard University, March 17-20, 2016

PAPER SELECTION FOR SEMINAR PROPOSAL: End of September

SEMINAR ACCEPTANCE NOTIFICATION: October 2015

De Candy Candy a Ergo Proxy y más allá: El anime en Latinoamérica (Panel)

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 4:20pm
full name / name of organization: 
Aidali Aponte-Aviles

NEMLA
47th Annual Conference
March 17 - 20, 2016
Hartford, Connecticut

Japanese animation has had an important place in Latin American TV for decades. This panel will explore the reception of anime and its impact on Latin American anime fan communities. These groups have created networks of science-fiction fans that actively participate in the construction of a transnational cultural identity. Latin American anime fans create literature and art that illustrate how they envision their national, and transnational communities expanding the canon to include the Latin American context through fan fiction and original work.

The deadline for abstracts for most sessions will be Sept. 30, 2015.

Legacies and Lifespans: Contemporary Women's Writing in the 21st Century

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 3:38pm
full name / name of organization: 
Contemporary Women's Writing Association
contact email: 

The 10th Anniversary Conference of the Contemporary Women's Writing Association in association with C21 the centre for contemporary writing at the University of Brighton.
University of Brighton Grand Parade site
Saturday 9-5, 17 October 2015

Keynote Speakers
Professor Lucie Armitt (University of Lincoln)
Professor Patricia Duncker (University of Manchester)

Queer Intimacies, Queer Spaces, & Scales of Desire

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 3:08pm
full name / name of organization: 
NEMLA 2016

Queer Intimacies, Queer Spaces, & Scales of Desire

This panel is searching for papers that address how LGBTQ* texts of the Twentieth and Twenty-first Centuries construct varieties of queer intimacy and attempt to anatomize the epistemological, formal, and affective structures that make such intimacies possible—whether in public or private. We are looking for papers that discuss the ways queerness operates in a variety of spaces: city streets, forest clearings, parks, gardens, restrooms, bedrooms, manor homes, and apartment buildings.

Publicly Private: Cities, Literature, and the Social Contract

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 3:04pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association (NeMLA)

This panel is part of the NeMLA 2016 Annual Convention, to be held in Hartford, Connecticut, from March 17 to March 20, 2016. The focus is the ways eighteenth- and nineteenth-century urban development altered previous modes of socialization and led to a pervasive undercurrent of urban-based anxieties within literature of the period. Panelists will examine literature that engages with the ways cities and life in cities reduce private space and force people together into public spaces, requiring some level of engagement with the social contract as they interact with their fellow urbanites. Such interactions involve questions of identity and dis/honesty, and a character's ability to read his/her fellow citizens successfully.

Showrunners in the Classroom: Teaching Strategies for Composition & Literature Courses

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 1:49pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association
contact email: 

Showrunners in the Classroom: Teaching Strategies for Composition & Literature Courses

In the last two decades, there has been a steady rise in our pop culture's awareness of the role writers, producers, and directors play in developing television series both from a commercial and critical context. With the advent of social media, fans are able to hear directly from the source on the fandoms that they hold so dear. This panel looks to investigate lesson plans and courses that are based on using the work of television auteurs in composition and literature classrooms. How are instructors using television episodes to construct critical thinking and writing skills?

The Rise and Development of Dystopia in YA Literature

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 1:48pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association
contact email: 

The Rise and Development of Dystopia in YA Literature

Young Adult (YA) Literature has always featured a variety of sub-genres working in conjunction with familiar tropes (beauty, sexuality, identity, etc.). In the last decade, there has been a steady rise in popularity of the dystopia sub-genre (e.g., Divergent, The Hunger Games, The Selection, Uglies), particularly in the emergence of strong female heroines. While each series has its own distinctive features and developments, a question remains when we look closely at the genre: is there any originality left when we know the pattern of events and characters? This roundtable looks to examine the rise and development of the dystopia sub-genre from its origins to the current climate.

Neo-Victorian? Pop Culture, Lowbrow, and Genre Victoriana | NeMLA 2015 | Submit by 9-30-15

updated: 
Wednesday, July 22, 2015 - 1:38pm
full name / name of organization: 
Northeast Modern Language Association

In the rapidly expanding field of neo-Victorian studies, the million-dollar question remains: what qualifies as neo-Victorian? For guidance, many scholars have relied on Ann Heilmann and Mark Llewellyn's definition, which specifies that to be called neo-Victorian, a text "must in some respect be self-consciously engaged with the act of (re)interpretation, (re)discovery and revision concerning Victorians." The implication is that this is a subgenre for respectable texts, of clear intellectual pedigree.

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