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Contemporary Dystopian Fiction (abstracts due Dec 1, 2015; collection of essays)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 10:45am
John J. Han, C. Clark Triplett & Ashley G. Anthony

Previously unpublished critical essays are being sought for a new volume tentatively entitled Illusory Visions: Dystopian Themes in Contemporary Fiction. Since the turn of the twenty-first century, new dystopian fiction has gripped the attention of the reading public, including young adults. Authors such as Cormac McCarthy (The Road), Suzanne Collins (the Hunger Games series), and Veronica Roth (the Divergent trilogy) have garnered acclaim from both critics and lay readers. In addition, as dystopian fiction finds its way into the English curriculum at various academic levels, literary scholars dedicate their time to the study of this increasingly popular genre. Dystopian fiction has a long history.

[UPDATE] Fictional Economies: Inequality and Novel, Essay collection with forward by Rami Shamir, author of TRAIN TO POKIPSE

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 10:44am
Joseph Donica/Bronx Community College, CUNY

Fictional Economies: Inequality and the Novel

Joseph Donica is an Assistant Professor of English at Bronx Community College.

Rami Shamir is the author of TRAIN TO POKIPSE (Grove Press 2011, http://traintopokipse.com/)

Abstracts of 300 words and full CVs due November 1, 2015 to
fictionaleconomies@gmail.com
Full articles due March 1, 2015
Projected publication fall 2016

Beats, Counterculture, & Hipsters area, SWPACA (11/1/2015; 2/10-2/13/2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 8:47am
Southwest Popular/American Culture Association Conference

CFP: Beats, Counterculture, & Hipsters area, SWPACA (11/1/2015; 2/10-2/13/2016)

Organizers of the 37th annual Southwest Popular/American Culture Association Conference seek paper and panel submissions to its "The Beats, Counterculture, & Hipsters" area.

ACLA 2016: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Death Representations in Literature: Epistemological, Social, Anthropological and A

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 6:55am
American Comparative Literature Association

This is a call for presentations for a seminar to be held as part of the American Comparative Literature Association's Annual Meeting, that will take place at Harvard University between 17th-20th March, 2016, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Scholars from various fields are invited to submit an abstract (maximum 250 words), by uploading it to the ACLA website (http://www.acla.org/annual-meeting) between 1st- 23rd September 2015 for the proposed seminar, "Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Death Representations in Literature: Epistemological, Social, Anthropological and Aesthetic Aspects".

JOSAAC: AN ANNUAL RESEARCH JOURNAL OF SCIENCE,ARTS AND COMMERCE, PUBLICATION CELL, DKD COLLEGE, DERGAON

updated: 
Tuesday, September 8, 2015 - 5:21am
JOSAAC: AN ANNUAL RESEARCH JOURNAL OF SCIENCE,ARTS AND COMMERCE, PUBLICATION CELL, DKD COLLEGE, DERGAON

JOSAAC AN ANNUAL RESEARCH JOURNAL OF SCIENCE, ARTS AND COMMERCE, PUBLICATION CELL, DKD COLLEGE, DERGAON, ASSAM (ISSN 2348-0602) invites article submissions by for its January' 2016 Issue. The journal is a peer-reviewed and published annually and publishes research base articles on various subjects of Arts, Science and Commerce.
1. The contributions should be original and not published earlier or submitted elsewhere for publication simultaneously.
2. The paper should be typed in MS Word in A4 size paper, times new roman font, 12 point font size in the text and all heading should be 14 font size bold with 1.5 line spacing.

Between Vulnerability and Resilience: Representations of the Veil in Literature, Film, and Fine Arts

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 11:32pm
Umme Al-wazedi and Afrin Zeenat

The veil's ancient and modern history and its resurgence in our time is an important subject for discussion for those of us posing new questions about women and Islam in literature, film, and fine arts. In Europe and the U.S., the veil is often presented through errors of conceptualizations. The frequent and numerous discussions on the veil's role and function prove that the media, in particular, seems to be obsessed with it. Recurrently, these discussions run along essentialist and ahistorical lines associating Islam with the ideology of shame and honor. Moreover, the Muslim immigrant "problem" in Europe and the U.S. and the fear of Islam and Muslims in connection with terrorism has heightened the controversy on the issue of the veil.

Craft Critique Culture: Bridging Divides (April 8-9, 2016: Iowa City, Iowa)

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 7:47pm
Kate Nesbit / Lydia Maunz-Breese / Heidi Renée Aijala (University of Iowa)

16th Annual Craft Critique Culture Graduate Conference
April 8-9, 2016
Bridging Divides
University of Iowa

CRAFT CRITIQUE CULTURE is an interdisciplinary conference focusing on the intersections of critical and creative approaches to writing both within and beyond the academy. This year's conference will encourage an examination of the "inter" of interdisciplinary—as well as the construction and deconstruction of boundaries between and within academic, public, private, personal, critical, and creative discourses—through an inquiry into bridging divides.

Dollars and Desire: Capitalism, Oppression, and the Racial Other

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 6:23pm
Northeast MLA (NeMLA)

The history of the commodification of Black bodies within a global context has been central to the Afro-diasporic experience. While in conversation with the Transatlantic Slave Trade and colonization; contemporary scholarship grapples with what it is to interrogate the consumption of Black bodies. Working from the perspective of Blackness and commodification in Black Looks: Race and Representation, bell hooks argues that the "contemporary commodification of Black culture by whites in no way challenges white supremacy when it takes the form of making Blackness the 'spice' that can liven up the dull dish that is mainstream white culture" (14).

Dollars and Desire: Capitalism, Oppression, and the Racial Other

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 6:21pm
Northeast MLA (NeMLA)

The history of the commodification of Black bodies within a global context has been central to the Afro-diasporic experience. While in conversation with the Transatlantic Slave Trade and colonization; contemporary scholarship grapples with what it is to interrogate the consumption of Black bodies. Working from the perspective of Blackness and commodification in Black Looks: Race and Representation, bell hooks argues that the "contemporary commodification of Black culture by whites in no way challenges white supremacy when it takes the form of making Blackness the 'spice' that can liven up the dull dish that is mainstream white culture" (14).

Literature and Human Rights (ACLA 2016 CFP)

updated: 
Monday, September 7, 2015 - 5:22pm
Sonali Perera (Hunter College, CUNY) and Janice Ho (University of Colorado at Boulder)

This seminar will explore the historical and ideological conjunctions between literary forms and discourses of human rights. On the one hand, human rights have been celebrated for representing a shared vision for social justice and international law in a cultural relativist world of shifting norms and disconnected struggles. On the other hand, human rights have been criticized for charting a path towards "imperial internationalism" wherein the rhetoric of the civilizing mission of colonialism is sometimes reproduced in an age of military humanism and "just wars."

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