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Utopia on the Margins (NeMLA 3/17-3/20/16; deadline 9/30/15)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 2:32pm
Lori Harrison-Kahan, Boston College

"Utopia on the Margins"
Northeast Modern Language Association
Hartford, CT, March 17-20, 2016

Utopian discourse has been a powerful tool for disempowered groups to critique the social norms of the present and imagine future equality. Yet recent scholarship has critiqued the limits of utopia itself. This panel will examine utopian, dystopian, and anti-utopian texts by people of color, women, and members of other disempowered groups in order to consider how writers on the margins continue, reimagine, or reject utopian traditions. Papers may address recent fiction or previously overlooked texts that engage with utopian conventions.

Cities, Centers, and Limits in Post-1945 American Literature (March 17-20, NeMLA 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 2:22pm
Tim Clarke, Caroline Holland

The city is a frequent topos in the literature of modernism and post-modernism, traceable from T. S. Eliot's "Unreal City" of The Waste Land to the imagined Guadalajara of John Ashbery's "The Instruction Manual," and yet, our sense of urban space grows less certain after 1945, when both the city and its literature change rapidly in step with the new post-war world. These times of mounting anxiety over city space and its expanding limits--from suburbs and slums to the growing insularity of neighborhoods--also give rise to a problem of literary periodization: where does modernism end, and what succeeds it? Should we speak of a "long modernism" (Amy Hungerford 2008), or do the aesthetics of the period demand another name altogether?

Call for book essays, Making and Being Made: Visual Representations and/of Citizenship

updated: 
Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 1:30pm
Corey Dzenko and Theresa Avila

Call for papers for Book Essays in edited collection

Traditionally defined by an individual's membership and level of participation within a community, scholars such as Eric Hobsbawm describe how "citizenship" results in access to benefits or rights. Yet citizenship moves beyond political framings. According to Aiwha Ong, cultural citizenship is a "dual process of self-making and being-made" but done so "within webs of power linked to the nation-state and civil society." Taking citizenship as a political position, cultural process, and intertwining of both, this book seeks essays that examine the role of art and visual culture in the Modern and Contemporary eras.

Dangerous Girls or Girls in Danger? (Society of Cinema and Media Studies Conference March/April 2016)

updated: 
Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 1:02pm
Michele Meek

Dangerous Girls or Girls in Danger?: Questioning Narratives of Girls' Sexuality

Girls' sexuality has long been a site of intense parental, pedagogical and public concern. Even today, the question of how (or even if) a girl might be sexual without being passively 'sexualized' continues to resonate, as evidenced by the American Psychological Association's 2007 Report of the Task Force on The Sexualization of Girls.

This proposed panel for the Society of Cinema and Media Studies 2016 Conference in Atlanta, Georgia seeks to explore conflicting narrative representations of girls' sexual desires and behaviors, in hopes of drawing out the divergences, presumptions, and anxieties regarding the sexuality of girls.

Call for essay proposals: edited collection on Joni Mitchell

updated: 
Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 12:33pm
University of Lincoln, UK

Call for submissions: An edited collection on the work of Joni Mitchell.

Editor: Dr. Ruth Charnock [University of Lincoln, UK].

Joni Mitchell is widely recognised as an innovative, influential, much-loved and much-imitated artist. From her debut album Song to a Seagull to her most recent Shine, Mitchell's music: her tunings, her lyrics, her scope have drawn critical and popular acclaim. And yet, scholarly attention to her work has been relatively limited. This edited collection will attend to Mitchell as a figure worthy of sustained critical thought and appreciation, with a major publisher having already expressed interest.

(Re)forming the Progressive Era

updated: 
Tuesday, July 14, 2015 - 9:59am
Autumn Womack and Laura Fisher - C19: The Society for Nineteenth-Century Americanists

(Re)forming the Progressive Era

The Progressive Era (1890-1920) occupies an unsettled place in Americanist literary studies, despite the period's claims to forward-looking progress. To some extent, this uneasy relationship to the discipline-- whose professional protocols, pedagogy, and scholarship often operates by means of century-based periodization-- reflects the period's own wildly unsettled nature.

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